Tag Archives: Hurricane Sandy

Testimony: Worker saw rot during Bounty’s repair

This is terrible.

This Captain made horrible horrible decisions.

By Aaron Applegate
The Virginian-Pilot
© February 13, 2013

The wooden tall ship Bounty set sail toward Hurricane Sandy with an unknown amount of rot in its frame despite warnings from a shipwright that had recently worked on the boat, according to testimony heard Wednesday.

Todd Kosakowski, a project manager at Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Maine, said the rot was found when replacing two interior planks the Bounty crew targeted for repair.

He testified on the second day of a Coast Guard hearing in Portsmouth into the Oct. 29 sinking of the Bounty during the hurricane, about 90 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras. The Bounty’s captain, Robin Walbridge, was never found. Another crew member died.

Kosakowski said that while the ship was in the yard in September and October, he informed Walbridge about the framing damage. Walbridge, he said, decided he would have it fixed the next time the Bounty was hauled out.

"I told him I was more than worried about what we found and voiced my concerns a couple of different times," he said.

For the entire article click here

You may remember we followed this story as it unfolded last October-

17 Abandon HMS Bounty off N.C. coast

Posted on October 29, 2012 by Joey C

The HMS Bounty which was the feature ship in Gloucester’s Schooner Festival Last Summer was taking on water out at sea and it’s 17 person crew just abandoned ship.

Uhmmm does this not beg the question-

“WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING OUT TO SEA ON THIS BOAT WHEN THEY’VE BEEN FORCASTING THIS STORM FOR OVER A WEEK?”

Somebody’s got some splainin’ to do!

17 abandon stricken ship off N.C. coast

Chickity Check It Video- Hurricane Sandy Rescue: HMS Bounty Survivors Interview

Bounty Captain and Crew Remembered

HMS Bounty Sinking Timeline

You Gotta Read This From A Former Crewmember Of The Bounty Written Just Days After The HMS Bounty Went Down

Video- HMS Bounty Final Voyage From Gloucester MA

HMS Bounty

HMS Bounty Photo In Gloucester For 2012 Schooner Festival From Tucker Destino

Video – Coast Guard Rescues 14, Searches for 2 from HMS Bounty

Say a Prayer for the Crew of the Bounty

Painting the Bounty

Posted on September 6, 2012 by Manuel Simoes

The 2012 HMS Bounty Docks in Gloucester, Massachusetts

Posted on September 1, 2012 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

The Schooner Thomas Lannon Salutes The Bounty 8/31/2012 Gloucester, Ma

Posted on September 1, 2012 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

The Bounty Arrives in Gloucester Harbor

Posted on August 31, 2012 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

Gloucester Welcomes HMS BOUNTY

Posted on August 31, 2012 by Marty Luster

Tall Ship Bounty Needs Crew For Trip From Boothbay To Puerto Rico

Posted on November 26, 2010 by Joey C

My Incredible Adventure- The Bounty

Posted on July 12, 2009 by Sharon

Guest Writer: Author JoeAnn Hart

What is the liquid equivalent of unearthed? Not unwatered. Dewatered? No. How about dredged? That’s more about muck than water, but for my purposes, it will work on a metaphorical level, as in, to dredge up the past. Gloucester did not feel the full force of Hurricane Sandy this fall, which gouged out New York and New Jersey, remapping their shoreline and reminding us that water may be unpredictable, but so, it seems, is land. Still, we got bruised just being on the sidelines, as massive swells spewed up heaps of seaweed along with the usual flotsam, our floating history. On Raymond’s Beach along the outer harbor, big ticket items included fish bins, net balls, blue tarps, and a beige rug.

 As Daisy ran up and down the beach sniffing out seagull wings, I gathered loose debris and moved it beyond the wrack line so it could be collected at a later date. Empty motor oil containers, rubber gloves, water bottles full of brown water, it seemed all I saw was trash. My friend, Jackie, who makes seaglass jewelry, once told me that you can look for seaglass or you can look for sea pottery shards, but you can’t do both at the same time. I was so focused on plastic I couldn’t see anything else, and nearly walked past a pale bisque figure the size of my middle toe.

Smooth as a pebble and blotchy with seaweed stains, this small seafarer had spent a lifetime under the concealing sea, maybe as long as a century, back when bisque dolls were commonplace. She is no longer that staid Victorian, but has undergone a sea-change. Naked, limbless, and marked with great age, she should be in a museum labeled “Salacia, Roman goddess of the sea.” Like other relics from an ancient world, the doll survived because she knew the great trick was to flow with the tide.

What of her past? She may have been left at the beach by a child, or fallen off a boat. Who says it was an accident? She could have been thrown out to sea by some snitty Edwardian toddler, or dumped as municipal garbage into the deep, as was our coastal custom not so long ago. She has holes at her shoulders where wire once allowed for movable arms, but salt ate the copper tendons, releasing first one arm from her body, then the other. The seas rolled her along the ocean floor, until one day she lost her head. Eventually she found peace wedged among the rocks, hidden by swaying underwater plants, with only a dull sheen of sunlight above. In time, her legs disappeared below her knees. No need for them in the place where legless creatures dominate. All the while, tidal sands brushed against her body, healing over the wounds and reducing her to a bare human essence.

Then a storm like Sandy comes along and changes the depth and nature of her sanctuary, shooting her back into the tides. How she materialized on Raymond’s Beach is a mystery. How I saw her is a miracle. Perhaps our eyes are programmed to spot a human form above all else. At any rate, she changed my focus. Seeing her nestled there in the sluice, the beach was no longer just a stretch of land where garbage comes to rest. Freshly washed by the outgoing sea, the wet sand glowed in the autumn light as gulls scoured the blinding waterline for morsels. Suddenly, instead of seeing nothing but garbage, all I saw was loveliness. I named the doll Sandy and took her home. She sits on the high ground of my desk, a lesson from Salacia’s realm: Do not just focus on trash, real or metaphorical, but keep your eyes and heart open for when random beauty comes washing up at your feet.

*

I hope you enjoyed JoeAnn’s beautiful writing. She is the author of the novels Addled and the forthcoming Float (Ashland Creek Press, February 2013). Float, set in coastal New England, involves the fishing industry, conceptual art, jellyfish, marital woes, and plastics in the ocean.

Ron Beckley of Gloucester, who specializes in disaster services technology, has been deployed to New Jersey To Aid In disaster relief after Hurricane Sandy

Red Cross volunteers deployed after Hurricane Sandy

Ron Beckley

From the American Red Cross-

American Red Cross volunteers from Eastern Massachusetts, after working in our communities during Hurricane Sandy, are accepting deployments to states devastated by the superstorm.
Ron Beckley of Gloucester, who specializes in disaster services technology, has been deployed to New Jersey.
Disaster Services Technology specialists are responsible for all the technology that is deployed on disaster relief operations. DST volunteers set up satellites where all phone and internet services have been disrupted, they set up computer services in remote locations for Red Cross caseworkers and often have to repair equipment in crisis situations.
The American Red Cross has mobilized more than 14,900 disaster workers from all over the country who have supported relief efforts. Volunteers have served more than 7.6 million meals and snacks so far, and have handed out more than 5.5 million relief items.
Ron Beckley, in accepting this deployment, is gaining more experience working with Red Cross experts throughout the U.S. When he returns to Massachusetts, his knowledge will help better inform our efforts, and help make our local region stronger.

Many in your community want to know how to help. They could train to become disaster volunteers, or fund this long-term relief effort by calling 1-800-REDCROSS or visiting RedCross.Org.

Part III Superstorm Sandy Trilogy

Superstorm Sandy Gloucester ~ The Morning After

Filmed on October 30, 2012, the morning after Superstorm Sandy, at Brace Cove, Gloucester. We were very fortunate to miss the brunt of the storm; Gloucester survived with relatively minimal damage. A heavy, thick steely-gray bank of clouds dominated the sky and the sun broke through for only a brief period. The streaming shafts of sunlight created a beautiful ethereal glow filtering through the atmosphere. The wind was very strong and caused a good deal of camera shake.

Music composed by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg and performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Peer Gynt Suite No. 1, Opus 46: Morning Mood.

Part I Superstorm Sandy Gloucester

Part II Seagrass Fantasy

Part III Superstorm Sandy Gloucester ~ The Morning After

Superstorm Sandy Gloucester

Filmed around Gloucester’s eastern most shores at noon during high tide on October 29, 2012 during Superstorm Sandy. Mother Ann Cottage fared well (the house next to Eastern Point Lighthouse), the swans were tucked in near the dock at Niles Pond, seagulls found shelter against a seawall, and the backshore road was still open (although jammed with sightseers) at the time of filming. Created for Good Morning Gloucester.

Music composed by Antonio Vivaldi ~ Le Quattro Stagioni, Opus 8, Concerto 2 in G Minor.

The morning after Sandy

This morning taking a walk saw wires down, Comcast, National Grid Trucks and lots of people walking around.

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The Rockport Finback Whale is Gone!

The Finback whale, formely known as the Rockport Whale, aka Finny, aka Stinky, is no more. Or at least he isn’t the Rockport Whale anymore. As of 11:35 PM last night Finny started heading out and was well clear of his rocky beach resting spot by midnight. He was last seen floating high in the water (well, high for a large rolling bag of whale innards), heading WNW at about 1.5 knots pushed by the prevailing winds of Hurricane Sandy from the ESE . The current will also head west for almost two hours after high tide (midnight), so there is nothing stopping Finny from becoming the Gloucester Whale.

The  waves are pretty decent size scouring the back side of Cape Ann so depending how Finny surfs he could be on Good Harbor Beach by morning. But I doubt it. He either gets hung up on the beach in front of the Cape Ann Motor Inn or he heads out to sea to be seen no more because the waves busted him apart.

So Sandy did a good deed during her lively visit to Cape Ann. She didn’t clear away too many leaves but she did remove twelve tons of stinky whale.

Hurricane Sandy three hours after High Tide

What an adrenaline rush.

Surfers on Magnolia Beach with walls of water.  Love the way the surfers get into the water, jumping off the pier.

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Backshore Roads Now Closed

At high tide I took a little tour around East Gloucester. Parts of Atlantic Road were still accessible however,  as I was leaving, the officers were installing road barriers from both directions. The waves were much higher at the Lighthouse side than at Good Harbor Beach and Atlantic Road. Video footage to follow.

Eastern Point Lighthouse and Dog Bar Breakwater ~ Hurricane Sandy

Sherman’s Point ~ Hurricane Sandy

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