Tag Archives: Greg Bover

Sister Mary Corita Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

August 21, 2014

To be disciplined is to follow in a good way
To be self-disciplined is to follow in a better way

Consider everything as an experiment

Nothing is a mistake

There is no win

There is no fail

There is only MAKE

Don’t try to analyze and create at the same time

They are different processes

Be happy when you can manage it

Enjoy yourself

It is lighter than you think

There will be new rules next week.

Excerpted from the Immaculate Heart College Art Department rules

Sister Mary Corita (1918-1986)

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Born Frances Elizabeth Kent, the Iowa native joined the Roman Catholic Sisters of the Immaculate Heart in 1936. She studied art at Otis College of Art and Design and the Chouinard Institute and received her BA from Immaculate Heart College where she laterbecame the Chair of the Art Department. She said her work was influenced by Buckminster Fuller and Charles and Ray Eames, with whom she enjoyed close relationships as she developed her signature style of painting and serigraphy, said by many to have changed the course of modern art. Corita Kent left the sisterhood in 1968, moved to Boston, and devoted herself to a highly successful life as a studio artist. Among her best known works are the “Love” postage stamp from 1985 and the controversial gas storage tanks on the Southeast Expressway in Dorchester which are said to contain the profile of Ho Chi Minh.

Greg Bover

With thanks to Christina Sun, in whose excellent Bowsprite: A New York Harbor Sketchbook I found this excerpt.

Gregory R Bover

Robin Williams Quote of the Week From Greg Bover

A reprise from March 2012

“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but only enough blood to run one at a time.”

Robin Williams (1952-2014) R.I.P.

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A Chicago native, Williams attended Claremont McKenna College and the Juilliard School, breaking into television as the alien Mork on “Happy Days”. Mork was such a popular character that the spin-off “Mork and Mindy” ran four years providing Williams with the perfect vehicle for his unparalleled mimicry and improvisational impersonations.

A veteran of dozens of film roles from Peter Pan to the deranged killer in Insomnia, Williams received an Academy award for his portrayal of a Harvard professor in Good Will Hunting, as well as several Emmys, Golden Globes and other awards.

Williams continued to perform stand-up comedy and was active in support of myriads of charities, several connected to his battles with substance abuse and depression. Thrice married, the quote may reflect self-awareness.

Greg Bover

Gautama Buddha Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

August 1, 2014

“The trouble is, you think you have time.”

Gautama Buddha (circa 563-483 BCE)

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Although the exact historicity of his life is lost in time it is generally accepted that Siddhartha Gautama, born a prince in what is now Nepal, was a member of the warrior/ruler class who, as a mature and married man, renounced his noble life and began many years of wandering and study, ultimately rejecting the extremes of asceticism and hedonism to establish a middle way to spiritual awakening. He spent the rest of his life teaching the Dharma, or the nature of things, and expounding the Eightfold Path and the Four Noble Truths, the acceptance of which is said to be the route to Nirvana, the perfect peace of a mind free from ignorance, greed and hatred. He is also reputed to have said  ”No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.”

Greg Bover

With thanks to Shelley Vincent

Tina Fey Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

July 24, 2014

Confidence is 10% hard work and 90% delusion.

Elizabeth Stamatina “Tina” Fey, (1970-    )

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A Pennsylvania native, Tina Fey was interested in comedy from an early age and got her foot in the door with The Second City improv group, moving to Saturday Night Live as a writer in 1992. She later became an on-screen performer and ultimately head writer for the series. She is probably best known for her spot-on impersonation of vice presidential hopeful Sarah Palin, and her long tenure as co-anchor of the Weekend Update segment, first with Jimmy Fallon and later with Amy Poehler. She left SNL in 2006 to develop the sitcom 30 Rock and has appeared in more than a dozen movies. She is one of the most highly paid actresses working today and is often listed as one of the most influential women in show business. Fey is a multiple winner of the Emmy, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards. In 2010 she was honored with the prestigious Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, the youngest recipient to date.

Greg Bover

Banksy quote of the week from Greg Bover

“A lot of parents will do anything for their kids, except let them be themselves.”

Banksy (1974?-    )

An English graffiti artist, film maker and painter, Banksy’s birth name has never been revealed, although he is said by some to have been from a middle-class background in Bristol. He first gained public notice in the early nineties for his ironic, existentialist, and darkly humorous street art that has a liberal and anti-capitalist viewpoint. Much of his wall art is stencil based and shows a strong influence from the earlier work of French artist Blek le Rat. Often labeled vandalism by the powers that be, his preserved work, sometimes an entire wall, can sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars. His first film, Exit Through the Gift Shop, won documentary awards at several festivals and was nominated for an Academy Award.

Greg Bover

Gregory R Bover

Jane Austen Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“Silly things cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.”

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

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Austen lived and wrote extensively about the life of the minor English gentry of the 18th and early 19th centuries. Her first successful novel, Sense and Sensibility, was published anonymously, and although she enjoyed some fame later in life it was not until the 1940’s that she gained the dedicated following her work garners today. Her other best known books, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, and Emma, set the tone for highly detailed seriocomic romantic fiction describing the dependency of the women of that time on the correct marriage to assure their standing and security. Few details of her quiet domestic life are known, including the cause of her relatively early death.

Delmore Schwartz Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“Existentialism means that no one else can take a bath for you.”

Delmore Schwartz 1913-1966

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Born to Jewish parents in Brooklyn, NY, Schwartz attended Columbia and the University of Wisconsin before receiving a degree from New York University. He studied philosophy as a graduate student under the great Alfred North Whitehead at Harvard while he roomed with the poet Robert Lowell. His first book, In Dreams Responsibilities Begin, based on his parents failed marriage, gained him widespread notice. He went on to teach writing at a number of schools including Syracuse and Kenyon. Among his many students and protégés was Saul Bellow, whose Humboldt’s Gift is based on their relationship. Lou Reed of the Velvet Underground also studied with Schwartz, wrote at least two songs in his memory and named him the “first great man I ever met.” Schwartz died at 52, alone and isolated from the world, from complications of alcoholism and mental illness.

Greg Bover

Henry Ford Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“If you think you can do a thing, or think you can’t do a thing, you are right.”

Henry Ford (1863-1947)

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The quintessential American industrialist, Ford got his start as an engineer with the Edison Illumination Company, eventually rising to Chief Engineer and beginning to experiment with vehicles powered by internal combustion engines. Ford is credited with the development of assembly line manufacturing and the franchise system which allowed him to produce and sell a car that the middle class could afford. He also believed in paying his employees much higher wages than average so that they could help fuel an upward capitalist spiral. He thought increased international commerce would lead to peace and was only a reluctant supporter of the US war effort, although at its peak his Willow Run plant was building one B-24 bomber every hour. Ford’s reputation as a philanthropist was enhanced by the vast wealth he left to the Ford Foundation, but sullied by his life-long anti-Semitism.

Greg Bover

Friedrich Nietzsche Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.”

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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Born in the Prussian province of Saxony, Nietzsche showed a particular aptitude for music and language as a young man. His extensive knowledge of Roman and Greek culture led to his appointment as Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel at the age of 24. His later study of the works of Schopenhauer and Ritschl ignited his interest in philosophy and helped him promulgate his own ideas on relativistic truth, the origins of morality, and the failings of Christianity. He had a close relationship with Richard and Cosima Wagner, and with Lou Andreas Salomé, who would later mentor Rilke. Nietzsche’s philosophy included what he called the “death of God” and the individual’s “will to power” which many viewed as dangerously egocentric. His failing health and ultimate early death left his papers in the hands of his younger sister, whose husband was a prominent German Nationalist and anti-Semite. Their reworking of posthumous editions of his philosophy gave them an ugly twist the Nazis later used to justify their amorality.  A master of aphorism, it was Nietzsche who coined the phrase “That which does not kill us makes us stronger,” but also “Within every real man is hidden a child who wants to play.”

Greg Bover

Red Shed Film Festival Highlights

Red Shed Film Festival ©Kim Smith 2014Red Shed Film Festival Organizers Michael Kelly, Henry Cooper, and Sarah Kelly

The Red Shed Film Festival had a tremendous turnout Saturday night. Festival organizers Henry Cooper, Michael Kelly, and Phil Hopkins were there hosting the screenings, and did a fabulous job running the event. I had a wonderful time and plan to participate again next year. Dining al fresco under the cherry trees on Wally’s Bistrot’s super delicious barbeque and Twin Lights soda just added to the fun.

RedShed Film Festival ©Kim Smith 2014 -1Collecting Cherry Blossom “Snow”

For the next few nights, I’ll post several of my favorite films screened at the festival. Some may have played previously on Good Morning Gloucester, but would be worth seeing again. I hope you enjoy them as much as did I!

The first film, To Hear the Music: The Opus 139 Project by Dennis Larson, is a nine-minute trailer to the larger project of the same name, and features our own Greg Bover!

The Opus 139 Project is an independent documentary film that tracks the progress of design and construction of a new pipe organ for Harvard University’s Memorial Church, built by the C.B. Fisk Pipe Organ Company of Gloucester, Massachusetts. For more information, please contact producer@tohearthemusic.com. Also, find The Opus 139 Project on Facebook and become a fan!

Rockport Festivals produced The Red Shed Film Festival as part of Motif No.1 Day in association with Granite Vision Video Production.

The Red Shed Film Festival Team:
Production: Henry Cooper, Michael Kelly, Sarah Kelly, and  Phil Hopkins,
Graphics: Darren Mason and Kylie Alexander

Cherry Tree ©Kim Smith 2014

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Christopher Morley Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“High heels were invented by a woman who had been kissed on the forehead.”

Christopher Morley (1890-1957)

Born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, Morley was the valedictorian of his class at Haverford College and spent three years in Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. Although sometimes unacknowledged today, he had an enormous effect on American journalism and literature in the first half of the twentieth century, writing over 100 novels, plays, and collections of essays. A great fan of Arthur Conan Doyle; he was a founder of the Baker Street Irregulars and annotated an edition of Doyle’s complete works, while also compiling a similar edition of Shakespeare. He was the editor of the 11th and 12th editions of Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, (a book which launched my interest in quotes long before the Internet made them ubiquitous,) and a judge for The Book of the Month Club, which regularly exposed the mass market to works with high aspirations. His last quote, published after his death, reads: “Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity.”

Greg Bover

Luis Barragan Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“A garden must combine the mysterious and the poetic with a sense of joy and serenity”

Luis Barragan (1902-1988)

A native of Guadalajara, Mexico, Barragan first studied engineering but moved toward architecture after coming under the influence of the French-German writer Ferdinand Bac and Le Corbusier. Best known for his modernist work of simple shapes expressed in bright colors, Barragan rejected functionalism for what he called “emotional architecture.” He was the second person to be awarded the Pritzker Prize (1980). His house and studio in Mexico City are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Greg Bover

Gregory R Bover

V.P. Operations, Project Manager

C. B. Fisk, Inc.

www.cbfisk.com

978 283 1909

Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“It’s not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.”

Gabriel Garcia Márquez (1927-2014)

Columbian by birth, Márquez left the study of the law at the National University to take up a career as a journalist, ultimately working for newspapers in both Columbia and Venezuela before beginning to write novels and short stories in mid-life. His 1967 book One Hundred Years of Solitude was an almost immediate success, selling 30 million copies and garnering the 1972 Nobel Prize for Literature. Márquez is credited with launching the Magic Realism genre in which miraculous things happen to ordinary people in ordinary settings. A superstar in Latin American art circles, his leftist politics have often put him at odds with various regimes at the peril of his freedom. Although his fame allowed him to facilitate talks between the Columbian government and M-19 guerillas, his friendship with Fidel Castro and his criticism of US interventionist policies made him persona non grata in the States.

Greg Bover (with thanks to Shelley Vincent for the suggestion)

Gregory R Bover

V.P. Operations, Project Manager

C. B. Fisk, Inc.

www.cbfisk.com

978 283 1909

Mel Rosen Quote of the Week From Greg Bover

April 25, 2014

“I wanted to be a mime but I talked myself out of it.”

Mel Rosen (born circa 1945)

A former IBM programmer, Rosen is one of today’s elite cruciverbalists and has constructed crossword puzzles for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and many other newspapers. His puzzles have appeared in many anthologies and are famous for their understated wit. He is now freelance and much in demand. He wrote The Random House Puzzle Maker’s Handbook, helping to raise public awareness of his arcane profession. An amateur jazz keyboardist, he plays weekly at a restaurant near his Naples, Florida home.

Greg Bover

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe quote of the week From Greg Bover

April 18, 2014

I have come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element.

It is my personal approach that creates the climate.

It is my daily mood that makes the weather.

I possess tremendous power to make life miserable or joyous.

I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal.

In all situations, it my response that decides whether a crisis is escalated or de-escalated and a person is humanized or de-humanized.

If we treat people as they are, we make them worse.

If we treat people as they ought to be,

We help them become what they are capable of becoming.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe  (1749-1832)

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Often cited as the one of the most brilliant men of his time and the best writer in the German language, Goethe excelled in literature, philosophy and science. Although best known for his seminal poem “Faust,” which tells the story of a man who sells his soul to the devil, Goethe also made significant contributions to the theories of both evolution and the perception of color. He did important work in botany and meteorology while simultaneously heading the Weimar Theatre.  Politically conservative in an age of revolution, he was a principal advisor to the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar.  Goethe’s effect on early Romanticism and Humanism is hard to overstate.   Hesse, Nietzsche, Freud and Jung all cite his influence. His poetry was set to music by Mozart, Beethoven, Mahler, Schumann, Wagner, and Brahms. The botanical park and the Ducal Palace that Goethe helped to design are today a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Greg Bover

Khalil Gibran Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

Khalil Gibran Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

April 11, 2014

“Sadness is but a wall between two gardens.”

Khalil Gibran (1883-1931)

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Born in Lebanon when it was still a part of the Ottoman Empire, Gibran moved to Boston’s South End as a child, but returned to his native country for later education. He lost his mother, a sister, and a brother in the space of a year when he was still a teenager, and was supported by an older sister. His drawing and painting drew the notice of Fred Holland Day, an avant-garde Boston artist and publisher who introduced him to the staid New England art community, but it was his 1923 collection of inspirational poetic prose, The Prophet, which gained him widespread notoriety.  Never out of print, and rediscovered by the counterculture generation of the 1960’s, he is one of the best-selling poets of all time. Among the many memorials to Gibran around the world one resides in Copley Square.

Greg Bover

A Beautiful and Moving Tribute to Carol Gray, Retiring Sawyer Free Library Director

Carol Gray  Bruce Tarr Mary Weissblum John Ronan©Kim Smith 2014John Ronan and Company (Senator Bruce Tarr, Paul McGeary, Mary Weissblum, and Scott Memhard) Reading John’s Very Humorous Poem About Carol

Carol Gray husband ©Kim Smith 2014.

The library was packed with Carol’s colleagues, friends, and well-wishers, all with hearts full of thanks and gratitude for her guiding hand throughout the library’s recent years of growth and development. Everyone spoke of Carol’s extraordinary dedication, tireless work ethic, and positive spirit during this period of great change and challenges.

Sawyer free Library ©Kim Smith 2014

Bruce Tarr Scott Memhard ©Kim Smith 2014

Carol Gray Bruce tarr ©Kim Smith 2014.JPGSenator Bruce Tarr Gave a Beautiful Heartfelt Speech

Thank you Carol ~ we are all going to miss you in your role as the Sawyer Free Library Director, but are so happy for you that you will be able to spend more time with your  growing family!Carol Gray ©Kim Smith 2014

mary weissblum catherine ryan ©Kim Smith 2014JPGMary Weissblum and Catherine Ryan

John and Sandy Ronan ©Kim Smith 2014Sandy and John Ronan

Linda Bossleman Shelia  ©Kim Smith 2014

Mary Weissblum © Kim Smith 2014Shelia and Floria ©Kim Smith 2014Shelia Blake and Floria Crowell

I’ve shared this story with friends, but thought our GMG community would like to know how Carol’s positive can-do spirit has touched a life. My Carol Gray story is just one example of thousands!

Read more

Andre Gide Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“Art is the collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better.”

André Gide (1869-1951)

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A native of Normandy, Gide published his first novel at 22 and went on to write dozens more, as well as plays, essays and autobiographical works, receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1947. Much of his writing centers on the search for intellectual honesty in a world constrained by false moralism. Controversy swirled around him almost his entire life, principally for his open attraction to men much younger than himself, and for his marriage to his cousin, never consummated, while siring a daughter with another woman. In his politics Gide seemed to worship Soviet Communism from afar, until he visited Russia in the 1930’s, after which he became its vocal critic. He spent a significant portion of his life in the then French colonies of North and Central Africa and passed the bulk of the Second World War in Tunisia, but ultimately returned to Paris before his death.

Greg Bover

Noel Gallagher Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“And all the roads we have to walk are winding.”

Noel Gallagher (1967-    ) “Wonderwall” (1995)

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A Manchester native, Gallagher started in rock as a roadie and technician for the band

Inspiral Carpets, but quickly joined Oasis, originally formed by his brother Liam, as guitarist and songwriter. Leaders of the Britpop movement, which was a less dour alternative to the grunge and metal also popular at the time, the career of the band was marked by the battle between the brothers, and their extreme lifestyle. They enjoyed a marked degree of commercial and artistic success with several top selling records, but the turbulence, and a public fight, led to Noel Gallagher leaving the band in 2009.

Gregory R Bover

Carl Sandburg Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance.”

Carl Sandburg (1878-1967)

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An Illinois native, Sandburg left school at thirteen. He worked as a porter, bricklayer, coal heaver, and a farm laborer before briefly entering, but never finishing, college. He began his writing career at the Chicago Daily News and ultimately won three Pulitzer Prizes, two for his poetry in 1919 and 1951 and one for his widely read multi-volume biography of Lincoln, in 1940. Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, for children, and his accessible poetry made him a popular figure in mid-20th century America. It was Sandburg who characterized Chicago as “Hog Butcher for the World …City of Big Shoulders.” His American Songbag, a collection of folksongs, and his Grammy- winning recordings of these songs accompanying himself on solo guitar, did much to advance the folk revival of the 1960’s.

Although often attributed to others, it was Sandburg who said, “Sometime they’ll give a war and no one will come.”

We are still waiting.

Greg Bover

Gregory R Bover

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