Tag Archives: Gloucester Ma

Captain Joe and Grandma Felicia’s Wedding June 11, 1938

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Thank you to the person who brought this down the dock for me.  Sorry I didn’t get your name.

Ron Gilson writes in-

Good morning Joey:

Over the years I have refrained from commenting on various interesting community posts on your blog.  Who’s interested in an old man’s perspective?

However, today’s wedding story on your blog represents not only a detailed account of a  prominent Italian commuity wedding, but more importantly, to me, it is a detailed slice of our all important fishing community history.

In 1938, all the up and coming leaders of the Italian community fishing fleet were listed as principals in this wedding.  They were the future players about to write Gloucester fishing history.  The Curcuru’s, Ciaramitaro’s, Branceleone’s, Strescino’s, D’Amico’s, Calamo’s, Novello’s, Orlando’s, to name a few, were all in attendance.  It was a wedding spectacular!  

Ten years later, Capt. Joe Ciaramitaro, in his highligher Benjamin C., would lead the fleet in the redfishing game, along with Capt. Sam Nicastro in his F/V Felicia; Capt. Chris Cecilio in his F/V Mary and Josephine; Capt. Rico Strescino in his family owned F/V Balilla and later in the  Boston vessel Agatha and Patricia; the Brancaleone brothers in their family vessels Joseph & Lucia and St. Victoria; the Novello’s in their new Bonaventure and the Calomo and D’Amico families in their highline seiner, Ida & Joseph.

These Italian vessels and their crews and many others played a major role in the prominence of Gloucester’s fishing production in that era.  It will never happen again, and this wave of Italian-American immigrants should never be forgotten.  It was an unforgettable time in our city’s history!

Ron Gilson

The Tuna Were Biting On Tuesday – Photos from Anthony Marks

First at the dock after 4:00 pm was the Allyson from Kennebunkport
Maine with a 387 lb tuna. Next up at the dock was the Amanda & Andy II,
Capt Jim Santapaola and crew landed a 777 lb whopper of a tuna. Last
but not least was the Gannet with Capt Andy Santapaola, Jim’s son at
the helm with a 585 lb tuna. They were all beautiful fish!

GMG Update for Marine Mammal Response From Mendy Garron

Dear Good Morning Gloucester Community:

We know people were concerned and had questions about the harbor seal that was at Good Harbor Beach over the weekend.  I wanted to take this opportunity to remind people of what they should do if they see an animal that may need assistance.

October 4, 2014 injured seal

Donna Ardizzoni Injured Seal photo Oct 4, 2014 Good Harbor Beach Taken With Telephoto Lens

Up until this year, the protocol was to call the New England Aquarium.  The Aquarium served as the NOAA authorized responder for the Northshore area for many years.  On January 1st, the Aquarium refocused their response effort to sea turtle rehabilitation and the study of infectious disease in marine mammals. As a result they had to scale back their response area for stranded marine mammals and now are focusing their efforts on the area from Salem to Plymouth.  

Over the last year, NOAA Fisheries has been seeking an alternate organization to help us fill this void on the Northshore, which includes Cape Ann. Until an alternate organization is identified and authorized to help us, we ask that all stranding calls be reported to our offices.

Our program oversees the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program from Maine to Virginia.  Unfortunately, we do not have the capacity to respond to every animal in the field and do not have the legal ability to authorize individual volunteers to respond to these cases.  As a result, marine mammal stranding cases in Gloucester will be handled on a case-by-case basis.  When needed, we will seek help from other authorized stranding response agencies, but their ability to help will be limited and based on their available resources. 

I would like to ask the Gloucester community to spread the word about the current status of response to stranded marine mammals and remind one another to be responsible viewers of wildlife by:

- Staying a safe distance of at least 150 feet from animals on the beach or hauled out;

- Do not let dogs approach seals or other marine wildlife.  Marine mammals do carry diseases that can be transmitted to your pets, and vise versa;

- Do not touch or feed the animal.

Remember, seals are wild animals.  Medical treatment of these animals is significantly different from domestic and terrestrial animals.  We have to consider a variety of factors when making a decision about how best to respond to an animal on the beach including individual animal health and potential risks to humans and pets, the overall health of the species’ population , and how intervening may affect the natural ecosystem. Seals and other marine mammal species are federally protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

I would like to thank the Gloucester Police Department and the Massachusetts Environmental Police for their assistance in maintaining a safe viewing distance for this animal while it was resting on the beach.  The seal did go back into the water on its own Saturday evening and no further reports have been received.

More information about the National Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program can be found at the following website:

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/health/stranding.htm–

Mendy Garron, CVT
Marine Mammal Response Coordinator
Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office

NOAA Fisheries

MARINE ANIMAL HOTLINE: 866-755-NOAA (6622)

Gloucester In The Newly Released Olive Kitteridge Trailer- Including Passports, Lanes Cove and More…

Passports doubling as “Village Pharmacy” at 28 seconds into the first Olive Kitteridge Trailer-

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For Other Olive Kitteridge Cape Ann Good Morning Gloucester Coverage Click Here

Also the Olive Kitteridge Internet Movie Database website (Thanks Bex for the heads up) Here

New Pharmacy In Town??

Posted on October 28, 2013

Marty Luster photo, prepping for production-

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David Cox- Captures one of the days of shooting-

Getting ready for another day of movie magic on Main Street.

 

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So the Gauntlet Of Gross Has Been Thrown Down–Eating A Beating Striper Heart

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So this youngster aboard the Connemara Bay thinks he can out gross the master- Toby Burnham?

How will Toby respond to such disrespect for the gross out game that this youngster has shown?  Has the elder statesman of gross not earned a little more respect than to be called out in a 11 second YouTube video? Stay tuned for Toby’s response.

From the website of Connemara Bay Fishing Charters-

How to: Eat a beating striper heart

It is not the first time and probably will not be the last time we see an angler kick back a striper heart like a shot of whiskey.

Dana Wensberg was sure to get all the taste from this one as he chewed before swallowing. He also called out a local lobsterman, Toby Burnham, who frequently entertains tourists by biting the heads off of rotten herring

This back from 2009 when the youngster was probably still wearing diapers.

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