Tag Archives: Fredrik D. Bodin

In the Pit ~ Lanesville

Quarrymen, Lanesville, circa 1890 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
I have fifteen quarry photographs in my collection, yet only this one shows quarry workers. The negative is from a house in Lanesville, and came to me four years ago. These men stopped in the midst of their labor for a picture. Three granite cutters on top are double jacking vertical drill holes into the granite with heavy sledge hammers, which means they are alternately pounding on a narrow star bit, held by the brave cutter sitting down. As you can imagine, his was a dangerous job. Below, two quarrymen score a horizontal seam with hand hammers into the granite bed, where it will (hopefully) break cleanly. I haven’t been able to identify this quarry. If you recognize it, please let me know. Thanks.
Printed archivally from the original 5×7 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Image #A9957-007
Fred


Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Motif No. 1 and the Fish Boat, 1934

Motif No. 1, Rockport, 1934 Alice M. Curtis/©/Fredrik D. Bodin
Motif No. 1 is the most famous fish shack in the world, constructed around the time of the American Civil War (exact year uncertain). Initially used for storing fishing gear, it is located on Bradley Wharf, in the middle of Rockport Harbor (MA). The building soon became a popular subject for painters, including students of renowned artist Lester Horby (1882–1956), who coined the term “Motif No. 1.” Motif became an art studio in the 1930’s and was sold to the Town of Rockport in 1945, dedicated to the Rockport men and women who served in the armed forces. In this photograph, a 17′ Montgomery Fish Boat glides by. The Fish Boat class was designed in 1921 by Nick Montgomery. Six to eight hundred were made at the Montgomery Boatyard in Gloucester, and still are at the historic yard on the Annisquam River. This one probably sailed from the Sandy Bay Yacht Club. They were also raced at the Annisquam and Eastern Point Yacht Clubs. You can read more about the boatyard and fish boats in a GMG post by E.J. Lefavour here. Coincidentally, when I was traveling through the southwestern U.S., I visited Rockport, Texas – a small fishing town (mainly shrimp). In the restaurant where I stopped for lunch, there was a laminated placemat on my table with a photo of … guess what?
Printed archivally from the original 4×5 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #A8345-196
Fred


Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Saint Anthony’s-by-the-Sea

Saint Anthony’s Chapel, 1930 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Saint Anthony’s Chapel was consecrated in 1925 and designed by renowned architect Edward T. P. Graham (1872–1964). Graham was considered the “dean of Boston architects,” and recognized for his mediaeval style Roman Catholic churches. This church, constructed of fieldstone in the English parish gothic style, sits at the foot of Eastern Point at Farrington and Saint Louis Avenues. Mrs. Margaret Brady Farrell had Saint Anthony’s built and donated to the Archdiocese of Boston in memory of her father, Anthony Nicholas Brady (1841-1913). Notice the Saint Anthony statue in the niche below the cross, the observation tower on the right, and vintage autos in front. The interior is equally beautiful. I’ve been in there to photograph a few weddings, notably that of George and Ellen Sibley. Because so many local couples have married in the chapel, and continue to do so, this photo is a popular present for weddings and anniversaries. I always try to have it available in the gallery, especially in the spring. Saint Anthony’s Chapel is now part of Gloucester’s Holy Family Parish, and open in the summer.
Printed archivally from the original 5×7 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #A8557-011
Fred


Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Heyday of East Gloucester Square, 1930

East Gloucester Square, 1930 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin

I’ve been saving this photograph for a blizzard. Nary a snow storm’s come along, so I’m posting it now as a reminder of what winter could have been. The camera lens is pointing down East Main Street, with Highland Street in the center left, and the curve on the right at the telephone pole leads to the current laundromat and Duckworth’s Bistro on East Main. The store on the extreme left is J.C. Dade’s Hardware. The view is remarkably similar today. At one time the Square had three markets (Dutch’s, Powler’s, and First National); Wishnick’s barroom, Kirby’s pharmacy, Mrs. Fine’s seamstress shop with pants pressing, Jensen’s Shoe Repair, and two physicians (Doc Quimby, with Doctor Torrey next door). I’d like to thank Paula Parsons and Deb Callahan for this negative, and the East Gloucester fisherman who shared his childhood memories of East Gloucester Square. Please comment with your own remembrances.
Printed archivally from the original 6×7 centimeter film negative in my darkroom. Image # A9267-056.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Stone Sloop Albert Baldwin

Stone Sloop Albert Baldwin, 1934 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
I’ve been waiting fruitlessly for a Nor’easter snowstorm to post a winter photograph. It looks like tomorrow’s little storm could be my last opportunity, so I’m taking it. This is the Sloop Albert Baldwin, iced in off Rocky Neck. The 90 foot long Baldwin was built in 1890 at the James and Tarr shipyard in Essex. She was designed with extra reinforcement for transporting granite along the New England coast. The pilings in the photo are remnants of the Rocky Neck ferry pier, which was at the present public parking lot. Abandoned and derelict, the sloop was still rotting away when I came to Gloucester in 1980. About ten years later, the Sloop Albert Baldwin was cut up and hauled away.
Printed from the original 5×7 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #A8857-149
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Hotel on Pavilion Beach from Fred Bodin

The Pavilion Hotel, Gloucester, circa 1880 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The Pavilion Hotel, built in 1849, was Gloucester’s first true resort hotel. It was located between Stacy Boulevard and Fort Square, on the edge of downtown. The Gloucester Telegraph called it “the first specimen of architectural good taste ever seen here.” The Pavilion featured a two level veranda with dramatic harbor views, fine dining, a saltwater pool, bowling, and accommodated 150 guests. The beachfront of the hotel, called Crescent Beach at the time, is now called Pavilion Beach. On a foggy night in October of 1914, the 65 year old Pavilion Hotel, then named the Surfside Hotel, was consumed by fire. The building which we call the Tavern now sits where the Pavillion once was.
Printed archivally from the original 8×10 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Image #A88810-003.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Cape Hedge Inn, circa 1950

The Cape Hedge Inn, Land’s End, Rockport, circa 1950 Don Felt/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The Cape Hedge Inn was located at the end of South Street in Rockport, between Cape Hedge and Pebble Beaches. Across the street was the over flow guest house, and the little shack to the right of it was a hot dog stand. In the later 1950s and 1960s, the inn was called the Sandpiper by its new owners. Sadly, the Sandpiper burned in 1978. All that remains is a crumbled foundation.
The Cape Hedge Inn, Land’s End, Rockport, 1954 Anonymous/Fredrik D. Bodin
Aerial printed archivally from the original 4×5 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #a9245-578
Sandpiper Inn printed digitally from a post card.
Fred

Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Last Schooner

Schooner Andrew & Rosalie, Gloucester, circa 1935 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The last Gloucester-built fishing schooner was the Andrew & Rosalie, which was constructed and launched in 1930 at Burnham’s Railways (in the area now called Harbor Loop). With a 20 foot beam, her deck was 92 feet long and she carried 4,600 square feet of sail. The schooner was renamed American Eagle in 1941 by new owner Captain Ben Pine. In 1984, after 53 years of hard fishing with the Gloucester fleet, she was purchased and rebuilt by Captain John Foss for the passenger trade. Berthed in Rockland, Maine, Schooner American Eagle can be seen in Gloucester every September for the Mayor’s Cup Race, which she’s won eight times. http://www.schooneramericaneagle.com/
Schooner American Eagle, Gloucester ©Fredrik D. Bodin
Images printed archivally in my darkroom from the original 6×7 centimeter negatives.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Mount Washington Hotel

Joey edit-
Here it is back in 2002 from almost the same exact perspective.  Man I miss that car.-
DSC00365The Mount Washington Hotel, 1903 N.L. Stebbins/©Fredrik D. Bodin
In 1900, wealthy Pennsylvania industrialist Joseph Stickney began construction of the Mount Washington Hotel, located in Bretton Woods, NH. Two hundred and fifty Italian artisans were hired to build the steel-framed Spanish Renaissance structure. When finished in 1902, the hotel accommodated 600 guests, with a staff of 350. It had its own railroad station, post office, electric power plant, telephone system, and 6,400 acres for golf and recreation. Look closely between the two flagged towers, and you’ll see the electrified banner: MOUNT WASHINGTON. The photograph also shows the 1903 Glidden Automobile Tour, organized by the fledgling American Automobile Association. The purpose of the tour was to foster public acceptance of the automobile and draw attention to the primitive road system, which was unpaved, unmapped, and suitable only for horse travel. This was one of the first motorized endurance races.
Early Glidden Tour
Today the grand hotel thrives as the year-round Omni Mount Washington Resort. It’s a National Historic Landmark featuring a 25,000 square foot spa, two four-diamond dining rooms, and a renovated speakeasy: the Cave. In 1902, hotelier Joseph Stickney successfully charged $10 per night "in season" – twice the going rate at the time. You can book a room at the Mount Washington tonight for $199.
Fred

Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Old Freeman House

Old Freeman House, Gloucester, 1928 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The Davis-Freeman house, built in 1709 on 17 acres, is a first period colonial house located at 302 Essex Avenue (Route 133). It’s named after owner Charles Freeman, a descendant of eighteenth century Gloucester slaves. For many years the house served as a tavern on one of the two roads into Gloucester before 1950. From the late 1930’s to the early 1950’s, the Freeman house was the Stage Coach Inn, a restaurant serving lunch, tea, and dinner: “In this old tavern – one of the earliest – you’ll enjoy our hospitality and delicious food in an atmosphere of the old stage coach days.” The photograph below shows owner Harriet Johnson in the doorway of the house. Now on the National Register of Historic Places, the Freeman house is owned by Wellspring House, a Cape Ann organization assisting families and individuals to become financially self-sufficient.
Harriet Johnson, 1928 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin

Printed from the original 5×7 inch film negatives in my darkroom. Image #A8557-063 (house), and A8557-061 (Harriet)
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Dog Bar Breakwater

Dog Bar Breakwater, circa 1906 (note lack of rip rap on the ocean side on right) Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Dog Bar Breakwater extends nearly half a mile from the tip of Eastern Point across the entrance to Gloucester Harbor. It not only shelters the harbor, but also covers the treacherous Dog Bar Reef, for which it is named. Construction by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began in 1894 and continued until December 1905. The foundation of the structure is granite rubble taken from Cape Ann quarries, and is capped by 12 ton granite blocks supplied by the Cheves Granite Company of Rockport. A total of 231,760 tons of granite were used to build the breakwater. A small tower lighthouse marks it’s outermost extremity.
Ledge Hill Trail, Ravenswood, 1919 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Eastern Point Light and Dog Bar Breakwater are located at the end of Eastern Point Boulevard, The adjoining  parking lot and breakwater are part of Massachusetts Audubon’s 51 acre Eastern Point Wildlife Sanctuary -http://www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Eastern_Point/index.php
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Pier at West Beach

West Beach, circa 1920 V. Blanden/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The West Beach photograph evokes fond childhood memories from local visitors to the gallery. The beach, on Route 127 in Beverly Farms, is privately owned, although open to the public for nine months during the off-season. It runs about a mile from Prides Crossing through Beverly Farms to Beverly proper. It has been administered by the West Beach Corporation since 1852, after being bequeathed to the residents of Beverly Farms and Prides Crossing by John West, who acquired it in 1666. The pier was originally built for docking boats, later evolving into a popular place for jumping into the water and swimming. The sign at the pier’s entrance reads: “This Pier for the Sole use of the Members of the West Beach Corporation and Subscribers.” Great Misery Island, pictured in the distance, and now owned by the Trustees of Reservations , had structures such as the Governor’s Cottage, the Casino hotel, and Bleak House, complete with sea plane hanger. The pier at West Beach was destroyed in the blizzard of 1978, and now has only a few pilings remaining. This beautiful beach was painted by Gloucester’s Fitz Henry Lane 1855.
Printed from the original 5×7 inch negative in my darkroom. Image # FS-001
Fred

Fredrik D. Bodin

Bodin Historic Photo

82 Main Street

The Historic American Sneakboat

Sneakboat and Decoys, Plum Island, circa 1885 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
 
Basic Sneak Boat
The sneakboat is a type of duck hunting boat, dating from the early 1800’s, that was, and still is used throughout the United States in one form or another (sneak, sneak box, sculling boat, float boat, and coffin boat). This low-profile camouflaged boat allowed the hunter to lie down at water level amoung his decoys, maneuver quietly by wiggling a paddle out the stern transom, and lure flying ducks to seemingly safe waters. When the birds descend, he hunter sits up and fires away with a shotgun. Sneakboats proved to be deadly for ducks in the days of “market hunting,” when one could make a decent living killing waterfowl. The Rodigrass clan migrated to Plum Island from Nova Scotia in the late 1800’s to commercially harvest ducks, clams, and fish. They were notable both as hunters and as guides.
Nathan Rodigrass, Plum Island, circa 1885 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
The Rodigrass Camp, circa 1900 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Built in 1882, the Rodigrass Camp stood on Plum Island until 1989, when it was torn down. The Rodigrass clan later became stewards of the National Wildlife Refuge on Plum Island, protecting the animals they once hunted. I’ve met people in Gloucester who are familiar with or hunt with sneak boats. However, not many of us have seen a sneak boat, and neither have the ducks.
Fred

Howard Blackburn’s Bartender

Howard Blackburn’s Bartender, circa 1910 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Swedish immigrant Nils Lund settled in Gloucester to work as a fisherman. About 1910, he took time off from fishing to tend bar for the legendary Howard Blackburn. The Blackburn Tavern was located at 289 Main Street, where Halibut Point Restaurant is now. Chiseled into the front of the building in large letters: Blackburn 1900.

Albin and Nils Lund, Schooner Natalie Hammond, circa 1920 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
In the days of sail, fishermen would sign on to schooners headed for destinations they wanted to travel to. Nils and his brother Albin fished their way to Sweden and back several times. The photo above shows the mustachioed Lund fishermen, Albin on the left and Nils on the rightThe two brothers found brides in Gloucester, with Albin’s wife Josephine owning a boarding house on Main Street, next door to today’s Crow’s Nest tavern.
Printed archivally in the darkroom from 6×7 cm copy negatives. Original prints supplied by Lillian Lund Files. Image #  AC960901-03#05 (bartender Nils) and # AC010129-01#07 (brothers at sea)
Fred

Fredrik D. Bodin

Bodin Historic Photo

82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Marooned on – Eastern Point Island

Eastern Point Light, Perfect Storm, 1991 ©George B. Lenart
On October 31st, 1991, diesel mechanic and photo enthusiast George B. Lenart was caught in a historic storm on Cape Ann’s granite coast. He drove his big Mogul Motors truck out to the end of Eastern Point for a job with the Eastern Point Yacht Club. What George walked into was a hurricane strength tempest with sustained winds of 75 miles per hour and gusts up to 98 miles per hour (hurricane devastation occurs at 73+ mph). Unexpectedly, George Lenart was marooned by rising water and monstrous waves. He grabbed his camera  and captured this incredible scene from the 3rd floor of the Eastern Point Yacht Club. It shows Eastern Point Light and Dog Bar Breakwater, which guard the entrance to Gloucester Harbor. Waves built to 70 feet, one of which swept right through Mother Ann Cottage, seen on the left, and completely destroyed a house high atop Sherman Point by Good Harbor Beach. George’s only option was to camp out overnight at the yacht club.
I didn’t photograph the Halloween Storm. I was busy helping a Bearskin Neck artist move his paintings to safety, aided a neighbor on Rocky Neck save what she could after storm surge took most of her personal belongings out to sea, and salvaged the 150 framed photos that were damaged in my gallery on Tuna Wharf. The phrase perfect storm has become part of the English language, being synonymous with “worst-case scenario.”
Photographed on 35mm color negative film by George B. Lenart. Scanned and printed digitally. Image #GBL-001c
And yes, we do sell this photograph in the gallery. Thank you George.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

 

Cape Ann – a Farming Town

Goose Cove, circa 1890 Charle E. Dennison/ ©Fredrik D. Bodin
Gloucester and Rockport have historically produced nearly everything they needed: Ships, anchors, tools, rope, lumber, granite, fish, produce, and milk. Our first farm was established in 1658 by James Babson, and was located at the Babson Cooperage property in Rockport. Gallery visitor Laura Kerr told me that she and her husband counted eighteen working dairies on Cape Ann. In my shop, I display bottles from Bass Rocks Farm (George C. Nugent),  D.J. Spittle Dairy, Doctor Babson Farm (Washington Street in Riverdale), Kerr Farm (Riverdale), Lanes Dairy (The Best Milk – From Our Dairy to You), Lanes Farms, and O’Neil & Newman (West Gloucester). I wish I had more information and bottles.
 F. Maynard Tucker’s Vegetable Truck, 1930 Alice M. Curtis/ ©Fredrik D. Bodin
Photographs printed from the original 5×7 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Images # JW-001 (Cow) and A8457-037 (Vegetable Truck)
Dr. Babson’s milk bottle, from Fred’s collection.
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Gray’s Hardware, the Talking Machine, and Four Generations

   Talking Machine Sign for Gray’s Hardware, Gloucester, circa 1900 Anonymous/ ©Fredrik D. Bodin
My research for Gray’s Hardware began a week ago when I got an email from Lynn Gray. She’s the great granddaughter of Charles A. Gray, who founded the store more than a century ago, and wanted to know if I had any photos of it. As you can see, I have a picture of Gray’s Talking Machine sign (or is it a horse-drawn billboard?). Lynn loved it, but what she really wanted was the front of the building, which was located at 129 Main Street (where Growing Pains is now). I was on a mission.
I called up an old friend and retired lobsterman, who grew up going to Gray’s for onion and potato sets (bulbs), nails, screws, and hardware.  He said it was the first shop on Cape Ann to sell Kodak photo supplies. I think they were also the first “phonograph parlor” here, which were springing up nationwide since the Talking Machine’s invention in 1877 by Thomas Edison. My friend’s circa 1900 post card appears below, showing they named the intersection “Gray’s Corner.”
From Lynn Gray: “Gray’s Hardware was built in the early 1870’s. It was started by my great grandfather, Charles A. Gray, and was later run by my grandfather Charles J. Gray. My dad, James Gray, used to ride an old fashioned bicycle with the large front wheel around Gloucester as advertising for the store. He lives and works at Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, NH. If anyone has a picture of my dad on that bicycle, now THAT’s something I’d like to see :)”
If you can help Lynn find her father on that bicycle – please let me know!
Talking Machine photograph printed from the original 5×7 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Image # A9357-002
Post card from a private collection.
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Essex Dragger Newton

Dragger Newton, Essex, 1930 Anonymous/ © Fredrik D. Bodin
In view of the arrival of our newest Essex-built Schooner Ardelle, I thought it appropriate to show you another arrival in her time. The 116 feet long by 23 feet wide Newton. The Dragger Newton was built in the A. D. Story Shipyard for the Boston Trawling Company. Decorative flags and lines on the bow tell us she’s ready for the September 10th, 1930 launch. The Newton’s sister ship, the Brookline, was launched on December 18th of the same year.
Printed from the original 4×5 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Image # A9145-373

Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

The Homecoming

 The Homecoming, circa 1950 Anonymous/©Fredrik D. Bodin
It’s rare that a photograph can make me well up a bit every time I look at it. This one does. Although we can’t see see the soldier’s face, we know where he’s been: to war. Now he’s returned after a long hot trip, being welcomed by his family in an airport or train station. The three women, probably his wife, mother, and daughter, are all crying with happiness to have him home. It’s hard to not do the same.
About two years ago a woman came into my gallery with a few photographs she wanted to sell. I was struck when I saw this one, and bought it. It’s an 8×10 black and white glossy, with no information on the front or back. An unknown press photographer probably took the picture, and I don’t know if it was ever published. I wonder if he or she realized the emotional weight of this image. An unexpected gift for us on Memorial Day.

Scanned from the original 8×10 inch print. Negative #AD110530-001
Fred Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Memorial Day, Gloucester, 1904

This flag raising ceremony was held at 6:30AM near Addison Gilbert Hospital. In attendance were Gloucester’s Civil War veterans of Company G, Eighth Infantry. Company G, of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, was organized in 1788, and was called the “Gloucester Artillery.” After being reorganized in 1852, it was named the “American Guard.” They fought in President Lincoln’s Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) from 1861 to 1865.
Photographer Alice Curtis mentions “Uncle John” was the guest of honor at the Memorial Day flag raisings she photographed in 1904, 1913, and 1915. He is the bearded gentleman on the left. I believe Uncle John was Captain John Lowe.
Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Thank you to all of our veterans for your service.
Printed from the original 5×7 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Negative # A8357-058
Fred Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930