Tag Archives: Fredrik Bodin

Three Seasons of Illness, and Now Recovery

I  thank Addison  Gilbert Hospital, Beverly Hospital, Den-Mar Nursing and Rehab in Rockport, and Seacoast Nursing and Rehab in Gloucester.

I thank Addison
Gilbert Hospital, Beverly Hospital, Den-Mar Nursing and Rehab in Rockport, and Seacoast Nursing and Rehab in Gloucester.

I look forward to posts than other than those about my health. However, I think I’ve opened up an area that many folks are have interest in. I’ll always cherish the hospital and nursing home/rehab/VNA friends who saved my life.

Fred’s Takeaway from Saturday’s Block Party

Shelley4390wmYes, there were massive crowds on the street, but the the 150+ people I appreciated most were the folks who came in to encourage me with my battle with cancer and the attack by a gangrenous appendix. Tugboat Captain Doug walked right up to me behind the desk to give me a big bear hug. I thought I was going to get mugged, as he was clean shaven and unrecognized at first. City Councilor Sepatia thrust my rollator/walker aside to give another hug and kind words. Reiki Master Karen Pischke made a promise to bring the resources of her Dreamtime Wellness treatment to me at home. Shelley (with PT/OT calzones) from Den-Mar Rehab, one of my prime physical therapists, came by with half a dozen of her best friends,. Then three nurses from Mass General charged in and offered their support too.

I’d like to thank Valerie Marcley, long time organizer in charge of the Block Parties, for her hard work on the event, her sensitivity, and for being a good friend. She was there cleaning up long after I had gone home. Lastly, I want to mention my “Gyotaku” fish print artist Patrick Horgan, who just happened in from Seabrook, N.H. I convinced him to set up his display outside the gallery. It’s always a pleasure to work with Pat, and he escorted and drove me safely thru the darkness to the refuge of my home in Rockport. Cape Ann is a very special community that cares. They’ll always have your back.

Gloucester Sidewalk Bazaar No. 56!

The 56th annual Gloucester Sidewalk Bazaar begins at 9 am and is open until 5 pm Thursday, August 7th. It continues again on Friday the 8th and Saturday the 9th. Main Street in Downtown Gloucester is closed to all vehicles, and vendors of all types line the street from Prospect Street to Washington Street. Dance and musical performances take place all day. This is a great event for children and for grown up-bargain hunters. Enjoy! Painting by "Painter Barb," my sister.

The 56th annual Gloucester Sidewalk Bazaar begins at 9 am and is open until 5 pm Thursday, August 7th. It continues again on Friday the 8th and Saturday the 9th. Main Street in Downtown Gloucester is closed to all vehicles, and vendors of all types line the street from Prospect Street to Washington Street. Dance and musical performances take place all day. This is a great event for children and for grown up-bargain hunters. Enjoy! Painting by “Painter Barb,” my sister.

Swabbing the Deck, Rockport Harbor, circa 1950

US Coast Guard sailors swab the decks on their launch Straightsmouth. The launch was most likely the transport to Straightsmouth Island Light. The 37 foot lighthouse marks the course to Rockport Harbor with its green flashing light. The island is now owned by the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

US Coast Guard sailors swab the decks on their launch Straightsmouth. The launch was most likely the transport to Straightsmouth Island Light. The 37 foot lighthouse marks the course to Rockport Harbor with its green flashing light. The island is now owned by the Massachusetts Audubon Society.

No Fishing from Bridge, circa 1940

The Railroad Bridge, which crosses the Annisquam River in Gloucester, was a crucial link to the mainland, carrying visitors, goods. The Eastern Railroad built the Gloucester line in 1847, and it was extended to Rockport in 1861. These fishermen seem to be onto the fish, but even today, it's not a safe place to fish from.

The Railroad Bridge, which crosses the Annisquam River in Gloucester, was a crucial link to the mainland, carrying visitors and goods. The Eastern Railroad built the Gloucester line in 1847, and it was extended to Rockport in 1861. These fishermen seem to be onto the fish, but even today, it’s not a safe place to fish from.

A Birthday Gift of Cheer

I received this beautiful gift at the rehab today from my Friends at Good Morning Gloucester. Thank you so much, and I extend this thanks to all the kind folks who have wished me well and offered their prayers. I'm working hard to regain the strength I had before my appendix went south, and I estimate I'll return home in the next couple of weeks. The Edible Arrangement is called the "Cheer Me Up" bouquet.

I received this beautiful gift at the rehab today from my Friends at Good Morning Gloucester. Thank you so much, and I extend this thanks to all the kind folks who have wished me well and offered their prayers. I’m working hard to regain the strength I had before my appendix went south, and I estimate I’ll return home in the next couple of weeks. The Edible Arrangement is called the “Cheer Me Up” bouquet.

Lunch at the Emerson Inn

A few weeks ago my sister (Painter Barb) and her husband Robert visited us in Rockport. We discovered that our neighbor, the Emerson Inn by the Sea, was open for lunch in the summer. The convenience was only equalled by the tasty food. We marked the occasion by eating a platter of Darmariscotta oysters, seafood luncheon entries, and a good sit on the open porch. http://www.emersoninnbythesea.com/amenities.htm

A few weeks ago my sister (Painter Barb) and her husband Robert visited us in Rockport. We discovered that our neighbor, the Emerson Inn by the Sea, was open for lunch in the summer. The convenience was only equalled by the tasty food. We marked the occasion by eating a platter of Darmariscotta oysters, seafood luncheon entries, and a good sit on the open porch. http://www.emersoninnbythesea.com/amenities.htm

Part of the restaurant at the Emerson Inn is called the Veranda, a screened in dining area with adjoining open porch with rocking chairs. It all overlooks the Atlantic Ocean.

Part of the restaurant at the Emerson Inn is called the Veranda, a screened in dining area with adjoining open porch with rocking chairs. It all overlooks the Atlantic Ocean.

The grounds of the Emerson have beautiful plantings, benches, and a pool.

The grounds of the Emerson have beautiful plantings, benches, and a pool.

Cancer: Check. Appendix? Bye Bye!

I haven't posted lately because I wasn't feeling well, and my cancer treatment changed from hormone therapy to chemotherapy. I was progressively weakening, losing much of the strength I had recovered in physical therapy. I visited the ER at Addison Gilbert Hospital, was tested, and informed by Dr. Berger that it wasn't only the cancer – it was my diseased appendix, that was affecting me. Three hours later, Dr. Kacoyanis of Beverly Hospital surgically removed the offending organ. I'm regaining strength quickly here in Beverly, and feel much better. Although I won't be able to open my gallery for the wonderful Block Party July 19th, I hope you'll celebrate on our Main Street for me, and I'll see you there soon! Fred

I haven’t posted lately because I wasn’t feeling well, and my cancer treatment changed from hormone therapy to chemotherapy. I was progressively weakening, losing much of the strength I had recovered in physical therapy. I visited the ER at Addison Gilbert Hospital, was tested, and informed by Dr. Berger that it wasn’t only the cancer – it was my diseased appendix, that was affecting me. Three hours later, Dr. Kacoyanis of Beverly Hospital surgically removed the offending organ. I’m regaining strength quickly here in Beverly, and feel much better.
Although I won’t be able to open my gallery for the wonderful Block Party July 19th, I hope you’ll celebrate on our Main Street for me, and I’ll see you there soon! Fred

Three Sisters, Three Boards, and Fred

I know it's summer when I see interesting people all day song in the gallery. Today I met (L-R) Susan Olson, Kathryn Bracken (both from Salem), Jade Olson of NYC, and retired pharmaceutical test dog Fred. The ladies and Fred paddled the waters off Good Harbor Beach. They described the surf as exhausting and causing rip currents. Although no police were spotted, the US Coast Guard was present on the water.

I know it’s summer when I see interesting people all day song in the gallery. Today I met sistersb(L-R) Susan Olson, Kathryn Bracken (both from Salem), Jade Olson of NYC, and retired pharmaceutical test dog Fred.
The ladies and Fred paddled the waters off Good Harbor Beach. They described the surf as exhausting and causing rip currents. Although no police were spotted, the US Coast Guard was present on the water.

“Don’t Put Your Stupid Hat On”

While getting ready for a medical appointment yesterday morning, I watched the weather forecast. North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory said "Don't put your stupid hat on," warning the public about the shoreline hazards coming up the coast with Tropical Storm Arthur. In the waiting room at Addison Gilbert Hospital in Gloucester, the TV was tuned in to The Steve Harvey Show, and entertainment and talk show I wouldn't ordinarily watch. Steve's special guest was a woman from Michigan named Vicki, whose son was drowned in a a rip current on Lake Michigan. Ever since that day, she’s made it her mission to educate other kids about water safety. I've made a point of warning my Facebook and Good Morning Gloucester friends to beware of waves on our rocky shores and breakwaters. Two friends were washed into the harbor, and two acquaintances drowned off the rocks. Rip currents can be just as dangerous. Even on warm sunny days, with the storm hundreds of miles away, these currents put beach goers at risk when they enter the water. My best advice: "Don't go in the water."

While getting ready for a medical appointment yesterday morning, I watched the weather forecast. North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory said “Don’t put your stupid hat on,” warning the public about the shoreline hazards coming up the coast with Tropical Storm Arthur. In the waiting room at Addison Gilbert Hospital in Gloucester, the TV was tuned in to The Steve Harvey Show, and entertainment and talk show I wouldn’t ordinarily watch. Steve’s special guest was a woman from Michigan named Vicki, whose son was drowned in a a rip current on Lake Michigan. Ever since that day, she’s made it her mission to educate other kids about water safety.
I’ve made a point of warning my Facebook and Good Morning Gloucester friends to beware of waves on our rocky shores and breakwaters. Two friends were washed into the harbor, and two acquaintances drowned off the rocks. Rip currents can be just as dangerous. Even on warm sunny days, with the storm hundreds of miles away, these currents put beach goers at risk when they enter the water. My best advice: “Don’t go in the water.”

W. G. Brown and Company, circa 1920

W. G. Brown department store was located at 186 and 188 Main Street in downtown Gloucester. It was touted as the largest dry goods store this side of Lynn. The W. G. Brown building today is called Brown's Mall and stands across the street from the Gloucester District Court and Police Station. Dry goods stores carry textiles and household items other that those in hardware and grocery stores.

W. G. Brown department store was located at 186 and 188 Main Street in downtown Gloucester. It was touted as the largest dry goods store this side of Lynn. The W. G. Brown building today is called Brown’s Mall and stands across the street from the Gloucester District Court and Police Station. Dry goods stores carry textiles and household items other that those in hardware and grocery stores.

Gull Cove, Rockport, circa 1930

From the top of Granite Pier, we see a lot of going on at Gull Cove. Granite cobblestones, probably from nearby Flat Ledge Quarry, are ready to be loaded onto barges or schooners. Small gauge railroad cars sit on the other side of the cove, ready to haul granite from the quarry on the other side of the Keystone Bridge. Granite Street passes over the bridge, and past the Rockport Granite Company building, which is built with granite, of course!

From the top of Granite Pier, we see a lot of going on at Gull Cove. Granite cobblestones, probably from nearby Flat Ledge Quarry, are ready to be loaded onto barges or schooners. Small gauge railroad cars sit on the other side of the cove, ready to haul granite from the quarry on the other side of the Keystone Bridge. Granite Street passes over the bridge, and past the Rockport Granite Company building, which is built with granite, of course!

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