Tag Archives: Fishermen

So the Gauntlet Of Gross Has Been Thrown Down–Eating A Beating Striper Heart

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So this youngster aboard the Connemara Bay thinks he can out gross the master- Toby Burnham?

How will Toby respond to such disrespect for the gross out game that this youngster has shown?  Has the elder statesman of gross not earned a little more respect than to be called out in a 11 second YouTube video? Stay tuned for Toby’s response.

From the website of Connemara Bay Fishing Charters-

How to: Eat a beating striper heart

It is not the first time and probably will not be the last time we see an angler kick back a striper heart like a shot of whiskey.

Dana Wensberg was sure to get all the taste from this one as he chewed before swallowing. He also called out a local lobsterman, Toby Burnham, who frequently entertains tourists by biting the heads off of rotten herring

This back from 2009 when the youngster was probably still wearing diapers.

German fisherman catches world-record 515-pound Atlantic halibut

German fisherman catches world-record 515-pound Atlantic halibut

Marco Liebenow thought he hooked a submarine while fishing Norwegian waters; fish was so big it wouldn’t fit into the 19-foot boat

August 16, 2013 by David Strege

For the entire story and more pictures click here

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This story was forwarded to me by no less than 4 people and while by today’s standards it sure is a huge Halibut I remember my dad telling me stories about our Grandfather routinely landing Halibut aboard the Benjamin C that were as big as the forktuck.

So I don’t know if the world record is for something like a rod and reel record but from what my dad used to say those fish “back in the day” were caught all the time.

Maybe some of the old timers like Ron Gilson or our regular fishermen readers like Joe Testaverde can chime in on this.

When did fishermen switch from baited lines to trawling nets?

When did fishermen switch from baited lines to trawling nets?

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John McElhenny writes-

Joey,
Good reminder today about what a great source of information we have in the Sawyer Free Library. The History Channel had a question for a fishing-related TV show they’re working on so they contacted Gloucester. They wanted to know, When did fishermen switch from baited lines to trawling nets?
So we turned to the Sawyer Free Library and their excellent staff came through as usual. Reference Librarian Judith Oski put on her detective hat and here’s what she found:
According to the "Fishermen’s Own Book" by the Procter Brothers (1882), "The first trawl [in Gloucester] was made and set across Brace’s Cove in 1820, by Mr. John Rowe, still living at East Gloucester at the age of 75 years."
According to "The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States," by G. Brown Goode (1884-87), "About 1851 or 1852 an old Irishman down at Swampscott bought an old dory and went to work rigging a trawl as he had been accustomed to do in the old country."
According to "The Port of Gloucester" by James B. Connolly (1940), "For more than two centuries Gloucestermen did all their fishing from the deck of the vessel and by means of single lines.  It wasn’t until the third quarter of the last century [i.e. between 1875 and 1899] that Gloucestermen began to take notice of the trawling methods of the Frenchmen on the Grand Banks."
GMG readers can follow the Sawyer Free Library on Twitter at @SawyerLibrary or find the library on Facebook<https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sawyer-Free-Library/202051117106>.
If readers have other thoughts on when the adoption of trawling nets took place, love to hear ‘em!
John McElhenny

Bait and Tackle Open Casting In Gloucester Tuesday

Joey,

Bait & Tackle is holding an open casting call for extras on Tuesday, March 20 at 11 am at our offices in the Beacon Marine at 211 E. Main St., Gloucester. We are looking for a variety of roles including Fishermen, Dock Workers, Girlfriends, and Fish Plant Workers. In order to choose approx.15 extras, we will be taking a photo and gathering contact information.

This is a non-broadcast film project. Extras will be paid $50/day and must be available at least 2 full days (TBD) during the week of 3/26-3/30

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