Tag Archives: Eastern Point

A Magnificent Fog Bow

magic morning with fog bow

This morning’s fog was incredibly beautiful, but the most magical scene was a complete fog bow I encountered walking over to Eastern Point.  I have seen hints of them before – the start or end of one, but never a complete and clearly visible one.  It is one of the most amazing things I have ever seen.  If there is a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow – I wonder what awaits one at the end of a fog bow.  Fog bows are also called white rainbows and sometimes are called sea dogs by mariners.

E.J. Lefavour

"Red Roof" and "Red Roof Redux"

Christopher Lewis submits-

JOEY:

Two photos attached. The first is "Red Roof" on Eastern Point taken from the "Ardelle in 2012." This was the home of A. Piatt Andrew – for whom the Route 128 bridge is named. He was an under secretary of the Treasury. Red Roof  was demolished on December 14, 2012. The second photo is of "Red Roof Redux,"  the new house, taken from the "Thomas Lannon" on Sunday. The wing to the left and the stone work in front of the house were retained.

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This Jacket and Jim McCoy Saved My Life

Fred Bodin post for Marsha (last name withheld)

This Jacket and Jim McCoy Saved My Life

On December 19th, 2012, Gloucester resident Marsha (last name withheld) walked out to the end of Dog Bar Breakwater on Eastern Point on a fairly calm day at low tide. On the return trip, a wave soaked her ankles, the next one her calfs, and the third wave was a wall of water which tossed her 30 feet into Gloucester Harbor. Marsha went under, but was buoyed to the surface by her goose-down waterproof parka (not a USCG certified PFD). She swam back to the breakwater, and used her rock climbing skills to get up onto the first ledge. That was about all she could do. Hypothermia was setting in. Miraculously, birder Jim McCoy spotted her, maneuvered her to the top of the Dog Bar, and into his car. He immediately drove her to Addison Gilbert Hospital for treatment. Marsha told me this incredible story, while wearing the jacket that saved her life.

The Jacket: This helped save Marsha’s life two months ago. No, I won’t tell you who made it, because it’s not a float coat USCG approved flotation device.

The Breakwater: This is what almost took Marsha’s life. A lobsterman told her that that a storm from 3 or 4 days ago can deliver big waves, sometimes arriving underwater, until reaching shore. EJ’s photo wasn’t taken on a crazy stormy day. Watch yourself.

Fred

Bodin Historic Photo 82 Main Street Gloucester, MA 01930

info@BodinHistoricPhoto.com

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Eastern Point, 1884 From Fred Bodin

Fred Bodin writes-

I’m very familiar with Niles Pond, having spent five wonderful winters on Eastern Point. I hope the ocean’s onslaught can be stopped. It might be helpful for GMG readers to see how thin the barrier to the ocean is, how the pond abuts a road and homes with no protection from waves, should they come charging in, and how little real estate is between Niles Pond and Gloucester Harbor. Can you imagine the tip of Eastern Point becoming an island?

Fred

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Did You Know? (Eastern Point)

eastern point montage copy

Eastern Point is the southern half of the peninsula between the Atlantic Ocean and the eastern side of Gloucester Harbor. Without the peninsula, there would be no harbor. Eastern Point is about a mile and a half long and stretches from just north of Niles Beach to the Eastern Point Lighthouse and Dog Bar Breakwater, which are located at its southern tip.

The history of Eastern Point is both the history of shipwrecks and efforts to reduce their number and a history of the privileged class which settled and developed Eastern Point. Both facets of Eastern Point’s history are covered in detail by Joseph E. Garland’s excellent book, Eastern Point ( Beverly, MA: Commonwealth Editions 1999).

In 1728, during the heyday of the Commons Settlement in the Dogtown section of Gloucester, fifteen families lived on Eastern Point. After the Revolution, Daniel Rogers, a forebear of Joseph Garland, owned a large farm that took up most of Eastern Point. In 1844, Thomas Niles acquired this 450 acre farm, and in 1859, the “irascible” Niles, as Garland characterized him, won a state Supreme Court ruling barring the public from access to most of Eastern Point. This helped create a mystique of exclusivity for Eastern Point, which even modern visitors can feel as they drive through two gates to reach the lighthouse.

Development of Eastern Point as a vacation spot for the wealthy began in 1887, with the sale of the Niles farm to the Eastern Point Associates. The next year, construction began on what would eventually be eleven “cottages”, many of which can easily be seen today. The magnificence of the interior of these dwellings can also be experienced today by visiting “Beauport,” a 40 room house on Eastern Point designed and built by Henry Sleeper from 1907 to 1934. “ Beauport” is open to the public and operated by Historic New England, formerly The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. In 1892, the Eastern Point Associates went bankrupt, primarily because they could not provide an infrastructure on Eastern Point for the homes they were building. Perhaps the peak of Eastern Point’s caché as a vacation spot came in 1904 with the construction near Niles Beach of the Colonial Arms, a six story 300 room luxury hotel, which unfortunately burned down in 1908.

from http://myweb.northshore.edu/users/ccarlsen/poetry/gloucester/easternpointhistory.htm

During the summer while I am on Rocky Neck, walking Eastern Point is something I do often.  It is a small area packed with so many lovely and interesting things to see.  This montage only begins to touch them.

E.J. Lefavour

http://www.khanstudiointernational.com/galleryphotomontage2013.htm

Three Waters

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On Eastern Point there is a lovely stately home called Three Waters, so named because from the property the inhabitants can view the three separate waters of Gloucester Harbor, Niles Pond and Brace Cove.

One night recently I had a rare sleepless night during which the words “three waters” kept running across my mind like a broken record.  Muses can be very persistent and annoying sometimes.  When I got up the next morning, I spent the day creating this montage called “Three Waters”, using 22 different photo layers.  I have slept just fine since.

E.J. Lefavour

http://www.khanstudiointernational.com/galleryphotomontage2013.htm

Filming B-roll

Stills from my B-roll. Click images to view larger.

Niles Pond October Sunrise

One of the most gorgeous, interesting, and enjoyable aspects of filmmaking I find is shooting B-roll. I am swamped with design work, organizing lecture programs, and hoping to finish the edits on my Black Swallowtail film very soon, but there is no better time of year to shoot B-roll for my Monarch film than autumn in Gloucester; the light is simply stunning, and what I like to refer to as “atmospheric.”

Niles Pond September Sunrise

B-roll further tells the story in a beautifully subtle, and alternatively not so subtle, manner and gives the project a sense of place. While filming and waiting, for example, for birds to take flight (whether swans or homies) I have my still camera readily available.

Salt Island Sunrise

The most extraordinarily beautiful things occur spontaneously. I feel so very fortunate to see, and in turn share, the natural world through the camera lens. Only several weeks ago while filming a spider’s web in a tree, capturing the filaments of silky webbing dancing in the light of the setting sun (with the pinky schooner Ardelle and the Dog Bar Breakwater in the background), the web’s maker came cavorting through the scene with a capture of her own!

Eastern Point

Velvet Underground

This is definitely not what Lou Reed, John Cale, Angus MacLise, Sterling Morrison, and  Michael Leigh had in mind…

The release of the album Transformer was a seminal moment in our cultural history. The first video features David Bowie and Lou Reed with interesting interviews (with the Little Joe and Holly of the song’s fame), film clips, and photographs of the early days. The video ends abruptly, in mid-sentence.

An oft quoted statement attributed to Brian Eno is, “The first Velvet Underground album only sold 10,000 copies, but everyone who bought it formed a band.”

Lou Reed, John Cale, Angus MacLise, and Sterling Morrison were the four original members of the Velvet Underground. Michael Leigh wrote the pulp paperback The Velvet Underground, from which the band took its name. The book The Velvet Underground is about the sexual subculture of the early 1960s.

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