Tag Archives: Dragger

Cod Fishing, circa 1950 Part II

Once the cod are aboard the fishing vessel and out of the net, it's time to sort them. All photos by James H. Goodwin.

Once the cod are aboard the fishing vessel and out of the net, it’s time to sort them. All photos by James H. Goodwin.

The fish are sorted into what were called checker boxes, to separate the cod by size and quality. Todays fishermen uses boxes or totes. Careful packing of the fish with ice is important to avoid physical damage and spoilage, in order to get the best price.

The fish are sorted into what were called checker boxes, to separate the cod by size and quality. Todays fishermen use boxes or totes. Careful packing of the fish with ice is important to avoid physical damage and spoilage, in order to get the best price. Another tow is already underway as the cod are still being sorted.

Three men clean fish and one mends a net. Almost waist high in fish.
Three men clean fish and one mends a net. Almost waist high in fish.

Cod Fishing, circa 1950

Hauling the net full of cod. The steel dragger is unidentified. Photographer was James H. Goodwin. If anyone knew him, let us know.

Hauling the net full of cod. The steel dragger is unidentified. Photographer was James H. Goodwin. If anyone knew him, let us know.

The cod end is hoisted over the vessels transom and deposited onto the deck.

The cod end is hoisted over the vessels transom and over the deck. Same trip.

The cod end full of cod is being positioned over the checker boards. Just look at the size of that haul compared to the fisherman below. I'd love to ID this vessel. She was steel, and the photos were taken by James H. Goodwin in the early 1950's.
The cod end full of cod is being positioned over the checker boards. Just look at the size of that haul compared to the fisherman below. I’d love to ID this vessel. She was steel, and the photos were taken by James H. Goodwin in the early 1950’s.

Theresa and Allyson Stern Trawler

Theresa and Allyson Stern Trawler Gloucester Fishing Boat ©Kim Smith 2013

Yesterday morning after filming the sunrise at Good Harbor I headed over to the harbor to film the Gloucester fleet’s comings and goings. The Theresa & Allyson was bound for  port and what a beauty! She is a stern trawler, a type of dragger. You can read more about her owner, Allyson Jordan, and the boats origins here: Eat Local Fish. Also, found on the website is a concise history of New England ground fishing.

While filming, I am also photographing and plan to make more posts about our Gloucester fishing boats. I am not knowledgeable about ships and boats, but am very interested to learn, and love photographing them because they are beautiful. If I make an error in description or caption, please let me know. I would really appreciate your help–thank you!

The End Of An Era- Last Gloucester MA Eastern Rigged Dragger The Little Sandra Sunk

Check Out The Story On The Gloucester Daily Times Website-

June 5, 2013

End of the Little Sandra
Last of city’s iconic trawlers put to rest

By James Niedzinski Staff Writer

and photos from our Paul Frontiero-

“Little Sandra” from Glenn AKA “Swimdad”

Posted on May 16, 2011 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

Last of the Wooden Eastern Rigged Side Draggers

Posted on April 1, 2011 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

Last of the Old Timers

Posted on May 14, 2011 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

Little Sandra

Posted on February 28, 2010 by Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

The Gloucester Fleet

The Gloucester Fleet

“The Christina Eleni”

The Gloucester Fleet

The Gloucester Fleet

The “Miss Trish II

http://Art-Rocks.org

The Launching Of Our Grandfather “Captain Joe Ciaramitaro” First Dragger The Ben and Josephine

The Infamous One Found this courtesy the Archives At The Cape Ann Museum.  It was listed in The Atlantic Fisherman, April,1941

As I’ve said at least a hundred times now, if you haven’t gone to the Cape Ann Museum whether you’re a resident or Gloucester lover who visits you are missing out on a literal TREASURE TROVE OF GLOUCESTER LOVER ARTIFACTS.  You probably drive past the Cape Ann Museum a dozen times a week. 

Trust me head downstairs once you get there and ask for The Infamous Fred Buck.  Ask him about a piece of old Gloucester you are interested in.  I bet you dollars to donuts he digs something up for you!

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Ben Curcuru was our Great Grandfather and the man my father Benjamin Liborio (Libby) Ciaramitaro was named after.  Pictured are Benny Curcuru(great Grandfather to a ton of cousins in Gloucester and our Great Grandmother Josephine.

A Dragger’s Net Spread Out For Mending

Here is a dragger’s net spread out so that it can be worked on.  The orange balls act as floats at the top of the net as it gets towed through the water the boyancy of the orange balls keep the opening of the net as wide as possible to catch the most fish efficiently.  Along the bottom you see the rubber rollers which make up the bottom part of the net as it gets towed behind the boat.

In this post I explain how dragging works with arrows pointing out various parts of the net and how it all works- click here

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Beautiful Industry Pamet Winch

Here is one of the winches that haul the trawl doors in on the Dragger Pamet.  This winch is manufactured by Hawboldt Industries in Chester Nova Scotia, Canada.  What is interesting and makes for a great winch is the galvanized steel that holds up well to the salt water as opposed to the old metal winches which wouldn’t hold up nearly as well to the salt water conditions that these winches operate in.

Beautiful Industry Pamet Winch, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

By Comparison The Winch Below Was Aboard The Vincie N


Mike Leary and Joe (Stoga) Scola Aboard The Dragger Pamet

Here is Joe (Stoga) Scola and Mike Leary, owner of the Dragger Pamet.

Peter Prybot had an interesting column in the Gloucester Daily Times featuring Stoga and Mike in the paper this weekend.  Click this text for that article.

Look for an upcoming video featuring Stoga in which he gives us insight into the often heard but rarely understood saying on the VHF radio- “Who Killed The Bird?”

Dragger Pamet Door

This is one door out of a set of two which separate the net when it is set off of the stern of the trawler(dragger).  The chains you see are attached to the cable wire which is released from the winch.  Then the net is attached to the doors to get the spread needed to maximize the area of open net and snare as much fish as possible.

Dragger Pamet Door, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

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