Tag Archives: Donna Ardizonni

For Donna Ardizonni ~ Green Monster Green

For Donna and all the GMG Super Sox Fans ~ you can bring your Green Monster home!

 

BtoolpDCYAANkrq.jpg-medium Green Monster is part of Benjamin Moore’s newly introduced Fenway Collection. See also Boston Red, Boston Blue, Foul Pole Yellow, and Baseline White.

Benjamin Moore paints are available at Ben’s Paint, 6 Railroad Avenue.

Our Most Heartfelt Congratulations to the 2014 Gloucester Citizenship Award Winners!!!

UU Citizenship Awards 2014 ©Kim Smith 2014Back row left to right: Martin Klugman, Joe Novello, Jim Flint, Terry Sands, Barry McKay, and John McElhenny

Front row left to right: Maggie Rosa, Linn Parisi, Donna Ardizonni, and Ann Straccia

To receive a Gloucester Citizenship Awards is a very special honor and it is truly only bestowed upon the most deserving. At the award ceremony last night the love and positive energy had by family and friends for these outstanding Gloucester citizens was palpable. Donna Ardizonni and Melissa Cox ©Kim Smith 2014Donna Ardizonni and Melissa Cox ©Kim Smith 2014 -2Melissa Cox presenting Donna’s award, and sharing a funy story about removing dead seagulls from the beach.

Here at GMG we are very proud of all the recipients, but especially, especially proud that our own Donna Ardizonni was nominated for her good work with the One Hour at a Time Gang. John McElhenny ©Kim Smith 2014We are very proud too of our GMG super FOB and friend John McElhenny for his stellar job in spearheading the Burnham’s Field improvements and in turning it into a gorgeous new community playground, garden, and park.

Mike English Terry sands ©Kim Smith 2014Mike English Terry sands ©Kim Smith 2014 -3Mike English Honoring Terry Sands

On a personal note, I am also very proud that a very dear friend, Terry Sands, is one of this year’s honorees, for his extraordinary work directing (along with his co-director Mary Curtis) the fabulous Annisquam Village Players, for the past TWENTY- SEVEN YEARS!

Kay Ellis Linn Parisi ©Kim Smith 2014Kay Ellis Honoring Linn Parisi for her work with Discover Gloucester

Each winner was honored by a friend or colleague and it was wonderful to learn about the roles they have played in making our beautiful community all the more beautiful. Gloucester is  a very special place to call home and it is people like this year’s 2014 Citizenship Award recipients that make our city profoundly unique and, simply awesome! Our most heartfelt congratulations to the 2014 Citizenship Award winners!!!

Jim Flint ©Kim Smith 2014Jim Flint for his work with the Lanesville Community Center

Martin Krugman ©Kim Smith 2014Marty Krugman for the Schooner Adventure

Joe Novello ©Kim Smith 2014Joe Novello for the Saint Peter’s Fiesta

Barry Mckay ©Kim Smith 2014Barry McKay for the Rose Baker Senior Center

Maggie Rosa ©Kim Smith 2014Maggie Rosa for City Hall Restoration and the Gloucester Educational Foundation

Ellie's beagle ©Kim Smith 2014Anne Straccia’s Rescue Beagle Ellie

McElhenny Famiky ©Kim Smith 2014McElhenny Family

AVP Family ©Kim smith 2014AVP Family

Ann Margaret and Sefatia ©Kim Smith 2014Sefatia Romeo Thekan and Ann Margaret Ferrante

Sefatia ©Kim Smith 2014Sefatia for Terry!

Donna and Rick ©Kim Smith 2014Donna and Rick and Family

Sefatia and terry sands ©Kim Smith 2014JPGSefatia and Terry

McElhenny Family AVP Family ©Kim Smith 2014McElhenny Family and AVP Family

Beautiful Gloucester Gulls from Donna, Sharon, Mark, Len, Ann, David, and Nicole

WOW!! Thank you for sharing your Gorgeous Homie photos!!!

A second batch of new photos will be posted on Saturday. photo

Seagull

The above photo comes from Mark Lombard and the below photo, of seagulls in the snow, is from Donna Ardizonni.

©Donna Ardizonni

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As Ann Kennedy says, ” photos from a Gulliver (Gull-lover).” Ann’s photos are not strictly Gloucester Homies–though all are beautiful and included nonetheless.IMG_0218IMG_0163P1020594P1090298P1090299

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The above photo was taken by David Parsons. David writes, “This was taken on the Yankee Clipper. We were Pollock fishing Dec. 2011.”

And from Nicole, “Homies on the Hood!”

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Posted in the order in which they appeared in my inbox.

2013 Rocky Neck Plunge

Felicia Amanda and FriendsThree Amigos and Sista Felicia

Click the last photo to view more photos.

The first day of the new year started with pre-plunge preparations and a spectacular brunch at Sista Felicia and Barry’s Always Warm and Welcoming Beautiful Home.

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_DSF7759Ron Gilson, Peter Van Ness, and Erika

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Wonder Woman, also know as Donna Ardizonni

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More Three Amigos

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Van Ness Family

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GMG Chief and The Zip Line Kid

Happy New Year!

Click the last photo to view more photos

Carolina Wren

This post is for Donna and her sweet wren. I wrote this several years ago Donna, but thought you would enjoy it today.

That Chipmunk Bird

Come-to-me, come-to-me, come-to-me, repeated from sun up to sundown. Mellow and sweet—though loud enough to attract my attention—what was this new-to-my-ears birdsong coming from the thicket of shrubs? Occasionally we would catch a quicksilver glimpse of a petite sparrow-sized songbird singing energetically atop the fence wall or rapidly pecking at the chinks of bark on our aged pear tree. But this was definitely not a sparrow. His is a rounded little body with tail held upward. He has pale orangey-buff underparts and rich russet plumage, with white and black barred accents on the wings, and long white eye-stripes. Because his coloring is so similar to, my husband took to calling it “that chipmunk bird.”

Carolina Wren

After much running to the window and out the back door at his first few notes I was able to identify our resident Carolina Wren. All summer long and through the fall we were treated to his beautiful and sundry melodies. Here it is late winter and he is again calling me to the window. We can have a longer look through bare trees and shrubs. Much to our joy there is not one wren, but a pair!

The Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) is common throughout the southeast; so populous it is the state bird of South Carolina. When found on Cape Ann it is at its most northern edge of its territory. Gradually, as the climate has warmed over the past century, its range has expanded. They are sensitive to cold and will perish during severe weather. The Carolina Wren is a highly adaptable creature, dwelling in swamps, forests, farms, and tree-filled urban and suburban communities. They hop around leaf litter and dense brush, using their elongated bills to forage for food close to the ground. A pair may bond any time of the year and will stay together for life. It is the ardent male who sings the loud song and he is apt to anytime and anywhere. Carolina Wrens work together to construct their nests and feed their young. Their nesting sites are varied, built in both man-made and natural nooks and crannies; tree holes and stumps, and just as frequently, windowsills, mailboxes, tin cans, garage shelves, and holes found in porches, fence posts, and barns.

During the breeding season they have a voracious appetite for insects, supplemented with fruit, nuts and seeds. Hoping to keep our pair healthy and in residence, and worried that they would not have enough fat in their diet, I made a peanut butter feeder. It took under an hour and cost less than five dollars. I am experimenting with different recipes and will let you know which songbirds are attracted to what mixture and whether or not the squirrels become intolerable.

How to make a Peanut Butter Bird Feeder

Materials and tools needed: Portion of driftwood or fallen branch, approximately 4 to 6 inches in diameter; one dowel, approximately 1⁄4 inch diameter; one 1-inch open S hook; one size 12 screw eye; approximately six feet of chain; saw; drill, with one large bit, and one small bit that is slightly larger than the dowel; sandpaper; wood glue.

It took several tries to find driftwood that was not soft, wet, and mushy inside. Look for wood from hardwood. The driftwood in the photograph was cut to eight inches in length, after determining where the center hole and holes for the perches should be drilled. Mark, with a pencil, a two- to three-inch diameter hole, depending on the diameter of the wood. Mark the two spots for the perches, about 1 and 1⁄2 inches below the hole. Drill the side holes for the perches one inch deep. Drill the center hole, approximately two to three inches deep, again depending on the diameter of the log. Smooth the center hole with sandpaper. Cut two perches from the dowel, 4 inches in length, and glue into the drilled perch holes. Allow to dry overnight. Center and screw the screw eye into the top of the feeder and add the S-hook. Loop the chain around a tree limb so that it hangs five to six feet off the ground. Attach the S hook through the screw eye and chain. With pliers, close the upper end of the S-hook firmly around the chain and the opposite end just enough to hold the screw eye firmly in place, but not too tight that the feeder cannot be removed for easy filling and cleaning. Fill with peanut butter mixture.

Peanut Butter and Fruit Recipe ~

Basic recipe: Mix one or two tablespoons of peanut butter with an apple slice that has been finely diced. Add a teaspoon of raisins, coarsely chopped. This makes a perfectly appetizing and healthy mix. For variety, add dried cranberries, currants, chopped almonds, sunflower seeds, millet, and/or crumbled whole grain crackers.