Tag Archives: dog bar breakwater

Winter – Not Over Yet!

After the Storm, Long Beach, 1931   Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
In early March of 1931 a severe winter storm traveled across the United States. Chicago endured the second largest recorded snowfall in its history, up until that date. When the great storm reached the East Coast, it pummeled the shores of New Hampshire and Massachusetts with huge waves and extremely high tides. On Cape Ann, the 25 year-old Dog Bar Breakwater experienced 12-ton granite blocks tossed into Gloucester Harbor, and the severing of the cable to Breakwater Light. Long Beach, located in Gloucester and Rockport, had its boardwalk washed away. In the photo above, the Long Beach Hotel sits on the left. Below, the photographer shot toward Rockport in the opposite direction.
After the Storm, Long Beach, 1931   Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
As a result of the March 1931 Storm, Dog Bar Breakwater was reinforced with rip-rap on its ocean side, and Long Beach’s wooden boardwalk was replaced with the concrete boardwalk we use today.
 Hampton Beach, NH, March 1931
Printed from the original 4×5 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #8345-041 (Long Beach showing hotel)
Printed from the original 5×7 inch film negative in my darkroom. Image #88657-134 (Long Beach looking toward Rockport)
Photo of Hampton Beach from the Lane Memorial Library collection, Hampton, NH

Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Dog Bar Breakwater

Dog Bar Breakwater, circa 1906 (note lack of rip rap on the ocean side on right) Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Dog Bar Breakwater extends nearly half a mile from the tip of Eastern Point across the entrance to Gloucester Harbor. It not only shelters the harbor, but also covers the treacherous Dog Bar Reef, for which it is named. Construction by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began in 1894 and continued until December 1905. The foundation of the structure is granite rubble taken from Cape Ann quarries, and is capped by 12 ton granite blocks supplied by the Cheves Granite Company of Rockport. A total of 231,760 tons of granite were used to build the breakwater. A small tower lighthouse marks it’s outermost extremity.
Ledge Hill Trail, Ravenswood, 1919 Alice M. Curtis/©Fredrik D. Bodin
Eastern Point Light and Dog Bar Breakwater are located at the end of Eastern Point Boulevard, The adjoining  parking lot and breakwater are part of Massachusetts Audubon’s 51 acre Eastern Point Wildlife Sanctuary -http://www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Eastern_Point/index.php
Fred
Fredrik D. Bodin
Bodin Historic Photo
82 Main Street
Gloucester, MA 01930