Tag Archives: Catherine Ryan

You have to come see these works: Illuminating the world’s largest collection of America’s master luminist Fitz Henry Lane

Click for video with Cape Ann Museum Director Ronda Faloon-

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Cat Ryan writes-

RE-OPENING THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM with Director RONDA FALOON

Part 2 of 3: illuminating the world’s largest collection of America’s master luminist Fitz Henry Lane

 

 

In part 2 of touring the Cape Ann Museum, Director Ronda Faloon shares some of the NEW as we follow along with her. GET READY TO SEE THINGS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.

The Cape Ann Museum’s focus on art and artists is everywhere.

The dramatically redesigned welcome area and exhibition galleries enhance access and connections. There are new windows bringing the outside in. New amenities (welcome desk! coat room! lockers! bathroom!) on the ground floor orient and encourage us to get ready to take a breath, stop and look.

Hundreds of legacy pottery shards with transferred text from the museum’s archives are tucked along four new walls in Diane KW’s new installation, At World’s End- The Story of a Shipwreck.

When the Cape Ann Museum re-opens in August, the world’s largest repository of Gloucester’s very own Fitz Henry Lane collection will be 10x brighter thanks to new installation and lighting design. There’s more to Lane still to be revealed. Thanks to higher resolution images and powerful new media, the museum is producing a state of the art catalogue raissone and research tool, The Complete Works of Fitz Henry Lane, that will glow with close ups, archives, artifacts and stories. Nothing though can take the place of standing close and viewing these beauties in person. As Joey insists, “You have to come see these!”

It’s a GMG mission to make sure everyone understands how amazing this museum is and how fortunate it’s here in Gloucester.

SAVE THE DATES

August 16 – Cape Ann Museum Reopening Gala

August 19- Museum reopens to the public

August 20 – Director’s Tour

August 21 – Members’ Reception

August 27 – Curator’s Tour

 

Cape Ann Museum website: www.capeannmuseum.org

 

More on Diane Chen http://www.dianekw.com/ and here Cape Ann Ceramics Festival’s 2nd ambitious promotion of the medium is coming up August 7 –September 1 www.capeannceramicsfestival.org

Part 1 Director of the Cape Ann Museum, Ronda Faloon, digs deep and shares what we need to know about its dazzling transformation, maps it out and starts us at the enticing ground floor

Click video to listen-

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Cat Ryan writes-

With a world class collection and legacy, its ongoing support of contemporary arts, and robust exhibition schedule the Cape Ann Museum has no problem keeping the experience of art alive and present, and compelling.

It’s where you can come experience something that is not part of everyday life.

Ronda Faloon, Director of the Cape Ann Museum, discusses the museum’s transformation over the past 10 months and gives GMG exclusive access leading up to the grand re-opening. Getting there required long hours and difficult conditions, a 5 million dollar capital campaign and a ten month closure.  This stellar collection is shown in even better conditions.

There will be a week of celebratory and special events beginning with the kick-off gala of August 16, 2014, and open to the public Tuesday August 19th. Visit www.capeannmuseum.org for all the details, and sign up for progress updates.

Click Floor Plan to Expand Full Screen

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Thank you to Our Sweet Friend and GMG Contributor Catherine Ryan

I met Catherine initially through my work designing the HarborWalk gardens as she was very much involved with making the wonderful granite story markers placed throughout the HarborWalk (she also had a hand in many aspects of the HarborWalk’s creation). Catherine is a regular contributor to Good Morning Gloucester and her posts most often feature the work of Gloucester artists, along with covering a wide range of art and cultural related events.

I am so appreciative of our friendship, and also want to highlight some of the valuable volunteer pro bono work she does as the Mayor’s Representative on Gloucester’s Committee for the Arts. In that capacity, she works with the steering committee for the Gloucester Harbortown Cultural District,  provides on-going expertise for the Gloucester HarborWalk, and works on countless other statewide and New England regional outreach projects, coordinating with many cultural districts beyond our own.

As you may or may not be aware, Catherine created the interactive Google map with over 100 sites and images by Edward Hopper from his many visits to Gloucester: See Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester here.

image001Gloucester to Berkshires Map by Catherine Ryan. Click to view larger.

I was so touched by Catherine that she made the above map for my participation in the Berkshire Museum’s exhibit “Butterflies” and for my upcoming film screenings there. On Friday I learned that the Museum has scheduled a showing of Life Story of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly to air on Sunday, July 13th. We are planning additional activities around the event and I will keep you posted. So many thanks to Catherine for making this helpful map and providing a handy visual for GMG readers planning to make the trek out to Pittsfield and the Berkshires. 

Catherine writes ~

“I am SO HAPPY for you! Here’s a visual map to Western MA and proximity of some of the major Berkshire art & cultural highlights including 5 nearby Cultural Districts.

Gloucester to Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA 169 miles
Berkshire Museum to Mass MoCA 35 miles
Berkshire Museum to newly re-opened Clark 31 miles
Berkshire Museum to Tanglewood 14 minutes
Berkshire Museum to Amherst (many museums in this area, too) approx. 1 hour and twenty minutes

*Gloucester has 2 Cultural Districts and Pittsfield has one also. There are 4 other cultural districts in western MA (3 are within the Amherst vicinity): Springfield, Northampton, Easthampton + Shelburne.”

ArtsBoston released in a new 2014 report on the economic impact of the arts in MA

Hi Joey,

Here’s some exciting data that ArtsBoston released in a new 2014 report on the economic impact of the arts in MA. See the link for the complete report and a couple surprising and intriguing slides. www.artsboston.org/artsfactor

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For 40 years, ArtsBoston aims to connect everyone to MA arts. They have an active membership of 170-plus performing and visual arts organizations throughout Greater Boston. They weigh in with serious analysis and collective data and are a resource for best practices and collaboration. Last fall, GMG announced a podcast webinar from the Massachusetts Cultural Council on how to build audiences using ArtsBoston Audience Initiative which you can find on the MCC site.

image003 Excellent podcast webinar from the Massachusetts Cultural Council

google map of MA Cultural Districts From Cat Ryan

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Hi Joey,

Here’s a google map of the towns in Massachusetts with cultural districts designated by the Massachusetts Cultural Council as of 2014. Besides Gloucester, Barnstable now has 2 cultural districts.

If you’re traveling in MA–or anywhere across the US that has cultural district designations–they’re a good place to investigate ahead of time for planning.

The summer Butterflies exhibit at the Berkshire Museum that includes Kim Smith’s work is nearby 5 western ma cultural districts and ideally situated for visiting Tanglewood or whatever Berkshire art and trail you envision.

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Gloucester History Day at O’Maley

XbUWkTwIBR5yx7LCFf0Yl89ubRYLIw-sZ6hiqHr1Eq0-1 Nd2j__Agh_j5XrTRXsKG9rOzSwhKe452OMu5o-R1Rgc TjJq5Ia1m__pr1SqFoH5usWyP1FehxP5AlQzcxOHy5s FxpLEiL70rP2nGbPvGnCn6uQ8OvgGoapWy1mEwog0Q4 BUtHlbclrCy0hgW8kQy-zWSgTKdwdApiXr7fxhnfPE0 DN5eOW6zLHjDhbUJ4ZKKaDkI1TDZN4Oo8AEMQRVqGI4 Catherine Ryan writes ~

There were 10 adult presenters and each of us met with ½ the grade (5 classes each): Paul Goldberg Historic Photos, Joey Palmisano for NOAA, Jim Caulkett the Harbor Master, Leslie Bartlett for Granite, Catherine Ryan for the HarborWalk, Lara Lepionka for Cape Ann Gardeners, Paula Gray for UU History, Barbara Silberman for the Sargent House, Mary Ellen Lepionka for Native Americans, and Ramona Latham for the Trustees of the Reservation. Most of the other presenters were included somehow in the HarborWalk content — and the teachers mentioned that as one source! The teachers were fabulous and are committed to this project. Again this year all the 6th graders visited the HarborWalk (in the fall). The kids were engaged and enthusiastic, not exactly my doing, rather the material I had to work with, the teachers special build up to Gloucester History Day, and the dedication and uniqueness of the presentations before me! I wanted to sit in on all of them! Some of the students are working on projects and may have questions. Others wrote up a report for the whole day that they are sending into local media.

I handed out the large 11 x 17 sheet for the “hunt on the HarborWalk”. My son George had a smart twist on bingo and C7A’s map. Matt and Tom created a jazzy tear sheet announcing the movie series coming this summer (big enthusiasm for Jaws!) Virgilio’s was not only generous with offering a free Italian cookie (hopefully combined with a visit to the whale moment), but also such fun determining how we might track the $ value. He wants to split the cost with me and encouraged me to have the children write down an expiration date to encourage some urgency. He remembers fondly the school volunteering that he and his family and friends did for so many years.

The sweetest rewards may be from our youth!FxiTYCk1hCEe5G9qv3QZFLYVGONsdz768z6YgtKCv1Y
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PRINT AND DISPLAY this WELCOME sign for the May 4th cruise ship plus special hours and tours

Cat Ryan Submits-

Hi Joey,

Here are the Welcome signs that we are asking Gloucester and area stores, attractions and residents to print and post in their windows to welcome the Veendam cruise ship to Gloucester this Sunday, May 4th. The City of Gloucester and the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce are working with Cruiseport on the preparations. Have a look at the list of fun things going on!

Many local businesses and organizations are expanding their hours –or coming in on their day off– just to engender a special welcome.

Let’s remember to thank and support our local establishments! Residents can shop, tour, and eat & drink, too…

Quick facts:

Vessel Name: Veendam

When to open: by 10AM – 4PM (The first passengers will be coming ashore at around 9;30 and reaching downtown Gloucester by about 10AM.)

Passenger count: 2500

Crew count: 845

*If you have any brochures to display for a welcome table, please drop them off to the Chamber by Friday and they will be sure to get them to Cruiseport for Sunday morning.

Some of the special tours and programs being offered:

City Hall will be open from 10AM – 4PM for self-guided tours featuring the WPA-era murals and Committee for the Arts exhibition signage. Extra special bonus: there will be guided tours of the tower (passengers can see their vessel and an indelible view) thanks to the Restoration Commission!

Hi Joey,

Here are the Welcome signs that we are asking Gloucester and area stores, attractions and residents to print and post in their windows to welcome the Veendam cruise ship to Gloucester this Sunday, May 4th. The City of Gloucester and the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce are working with Cruiseport on the preparations. Have a look at the list of fun things going on!

Many local businesses and organizations are expanding their hours –or coming in on their day off– just to engender a special welcome.

Let’s remember to thank and support our local establishments! Residents can shop, tour, and eat & drink, too…

Quick facts:

Vessel Name: Veendam

When to open: by 10AM – 4PM (The first passengers will be coming ashore at around 9;30 and reaching downtown Gloucester by about 10AM.)

Passenger count: 2500

Crew count: 845

*If you have any brochures to display for a welcome table, please drop them off to the Chamber by Friday and they will be sure to get them to Cruiseport for Sunday morning.

Some of the special tours and programs being offered:

City Hall will be open from 10AM – 4PM for self-guided tours featuring the WPA-era murals and Committee for the Arts exhibition signage. Extra special bonus: there will be guided tours of the tower (passengers can see their vessel and an indelible view) thanks to the Restoration Commission!

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Cape Ann Community Cinema is featuring a line up for May 4th Stars Wars Day, “May the 4th Be With You” —beginning at 1:30pm. They have added a special 11AM screening of Captain’s Courageous with intermission at noon (beverage bar open!) and some other Gloucester surprises.

cat

Ryan & Wood Distilleries is offering a special one hour tour.

CATA trolley busses will transport passengers to locations downtown throughout the day and to Rocky Neck and Rockport. Local transportation operators are also stepping up.

Gloucester Chantey group including Tim Perkins, Roger Hussey and Barry O’Brien will herald the arriving passengers.

And here are just a few of our awesome stores that will be open!

Big Mike’s Bikes

The Bookstore

Caffe Sicilia

Cape Ann Olive Oil

The Cave

G33K

Gloucester Downtown Association

Harbortown Cultural District

Harbor Goods / Life is Good

Island Art & Hobby

Latitude 43

Local Colors

Maritime Gloucester

Mark Adrian Shoes

North Shore Arts Association

Palazola’s Sporting Goods

Pilot House

Pisces gifts

Pop Gallery

Premier Imprints

Rockport Fudgery

Rocky Neck, Rocky Neck Cultural District

Seaport Grille

TBT Post (new store!)

Tiny Island Beach Glass

Toodeloos

Tucks Candies in Rockport

Turtle Alley

The Weathervane

Feel free to add your hours and info into the comments!

 

Cape Ann Community Cinema is featuring a line up for May 4th Stars Wars Day, “May the 4th Be With You” —beginning at 1:30pm. They have added a special 11AM screening of Captain’s Courageous with intermission at noon (beverage bar open!) and some other Gloucester surprises.

 

Ryan & Wood Distilleries is offering a special one hour tour.

CATA trolley busses will transport passengers to locations downtown throughout the day and to Rocky Neck and Rockport. Local transportation operators are also stepping up.

Gloucester Chantey group including Tim Perkins, Roger Hussey and Barry O’Brien will herald the arriving passengers.

And here are just a few of our awesome stores that will be open!

Big Mike’s Bikes

The Bookstore

Caffe Sicilia

Cape Ann Olive Oil

The Cave

G33K

Gloucester Downtown Association

Harbortown Cultural District

Harbor Goods / Life is Good

Island Art & Hobby

Latitude 43

Local Colors

Maritime Gloucester

Mark Adrian Shoes

North Shore Arts Association

Palazola’s Sporting Goods

Pilot House

Pisces gifts

Pop Gallery

Premier Imprints

Rockport Fudgery

Rocky Neck, Rocky Neck Cultural District

Seaport Grille

TBT Post (new store!)

Tiny Island Beach Glass

Toodeloos

Tucks Candies in Rockport

Turtle Alley

The Weathervane

Feel free to add your hours and info into the comments!

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A Beautiful and Moving Tribute to Carol Gray, Retiring Sawyer Free Library Director

Carol Gray  Bruce Tarr Mary Weissblum John Ronan©Kim Smith 2014John Ronan and Company (Senator Bruce Tarr, Paul McGeary, Mary Weissblum, and Scott Memhard) Reading John’s Very Humorous Poem About Carol

Carol Gray husband ©Kim Smith 2014.

The library was packed with Carol’s colleagues, friends, and well-wishers, all with hearts full of thanks and gratitude for her guiding hand throughout the library’s recent years of growth and development. Everyone spoke of Carol’s extraordinary dedication, tireless work ethic, and positive spirit during this period of great change and challenges.

Sawyer free Library ©Kim Smith 2014

Bruce Tarr Scott Memhard ©Kim Smith 2014

Carol Gray Bruce tarr ©Kim Smith 2014.JPGSenator Bruce Tarr Gave a Beautiful Heartfelt Speech

Thank you Carol ~ we are all going to miss you in your role as the Sawyer Free Library Director, but are so happy for you that you will be able to spend more time with your  growing family!Carol Gray ©Kim Smith 2014

mary weissblum catherine ryan ©Kim Smith 2014JPGMary Weissblum and Catherine Ryan

John and Sandy Ronan ©Kim Smith 2014Sandy and John Ronan

Linda Bossleman Shelia  ©Kim Smith 2014

Mary Weissblum © Kim Smith 2014Shelia and Floria ©Kim Smith 2014Shelia Blake and Floria Crowell

I’ve shared this story with friends, but thought our GMG community would like to know how Carol’s positive can-do spirit has touched a life. My Carol Gray story is just one example of thousands!

Read more

Thank you Friends of the HarborWalk Cleanup Dream Team!

Thank you Beth, Susan, Jessie, Catherine, George, and Charles–an awesome team and an awesome job well done!!!

We had our first Friends of the HarborWalk cleanup this morning and made great progress. We didn’t get to I4-C2 and hope to next weekend.

If you stop by to have a look, you’ll see the diminutive Dwarf-crested Iris (Iris cristata) just beginning to show their sweet little faces. Dwarf-crested Iris are native to Massachusetts and bloom in shades of sky blue, lavender, and darker blues and purples–the HarborWalk’s iris are are deep purple with gold on their crests.

Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane? Wall Street Journal focus on Fitz Henry Lane

Cat Ryan Submits-

Hi Joey

Turner, Monet, Whistler, Dow…Lane?

Check out John Wilmerding’s review of Fitz Henry Lane’s half-dozen foggy views such as Ship Starlight in the Fog (c.1860) which is in the collection of the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, OH.

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http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694?mod=wsj_streaming_stream&mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052702304179704579459632424531694.html%3Fmod%3Dwsj_streaming_stream&fpid=2,7,121,122,201,401,641,1009

For more hazy light and atmosphere, rivers and tides, and artists born in MA: the WSJ  has covered the James Abbott McNeill Whistler biography by Sutherland

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and current Whistler exhibitions which you can check out if you hustle. An American in London: Whistler and the Thames at Addison Gallery of American Art is closing April 13, 2014. Go!

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No deadlines:

Make time to visit Ipswich and seek out work by Arthur Wesley Dow.

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And when it re-opens, Cape Ann Museum for all things Lane.

CROSS-COUNTRY CHRONICLE Catherine Ryan on Gloucester, MA in landmark FSA/OWI documentary photographs Part 2

 
American Photographer ARTHUR ROTHSTEIN (1915-1985)19 FSA photos in Gloucester, MA, September 1937
Joey recently featured Wallflowers, by Gordon Parks on GMG which reminded me of the road less traveled within the historic collection of photographs archived at the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library. This post is Part 2 in a series on Gloucester images in this legendary Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) collection. You can go back to Part 1 about Gordon Parks and for some background about the program.
Arthur Rothstein is one of Roy Stryker’s elite team of FSA/OWI photographers. There are over 10,000 photos by Rothstein alone in the massive collection. Rothstein became a premier American photo journalist and the Director of LOOK (1947-1971) and Parade magazines.Director Roy Stryker brought recent graduate Arthur Rothstein to WashingtonDC to set up a state of the art dark room for the new Resettlement Administration Historical Section. In his senior year at ColumbiaUniversity, Rothstein had worked with professors Tugwell and Roy Stryker.Rothstein was 20. Stryker had him out in the field almost immediately. The job meant he had to learn how to drive a car.
In May 1936, Rothstein’s South Dakota Badlands drought images caused controversy then, and discussion still. Rothstein’s April 1936 Oklahoma photograph of a father and his two boys fleeing Mother Nature in CimmaronCounty may be the archetypal image of the Dust Bowl.Here are a few examples and flavor of a fraction of Rothstein’s FSA work (broad themes): Mother Nature/Disaster; migrant workers and flight (showing one from MT); Gees Bend; sense of humor.Those images are followed by a few he did in Gloucester. The people are not identified in the Arthur Rothstein Gloucester photos. He’s here in 1937, the same year that the movie adaptation of Captains Courageous is a big hit.

There’s an artist in action, seen from the back. Who is it?

“Migratory workers returning from day’s work. Robstown camp, Texas. Everyday from twenty to thirty cars moving out from the Dakotas pass the Montana Highway Department’s port of entry.”
COLLECTION QUICK FACTS The Farm Security Administration/ Office of War (FSA/OWI)Director throughout = Roy Stryker acting akin to visionary art dealer

Photographers = Pioneers in the field of photo journalism, photography, including Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, and GordonParks

Library of Congress FSA/OWI collection = Nearly 280,000 objects as follows: black and white negatives (170,000+); black and white prints (100,000+); color photographs (1600+). New York Public Library has a substantial collection.

1937 Arthur Rothstein: 10,000+ images (FSA/OWI) / 19 images Gloucester.Mostly rural images. For example 1400+ images in MT and less than 40 total for MA

1942 Gordon Parks: 1600+ (FSA/OWI) / 220+ images Gloucester. Gloucester names to search for: Frank Mineo, the Alden, Vito Cannela, Vito Camella, Vito Coppola, Frank Domingos, Gaspar Favozza, Giacomo Frusteri, Vito Giocione, Pasquale Maniscaleo, Anonio Milietello, Anthony Parisi, Franasco Parisi, Dominic Tello, Antonio Tiaro, Lorenzo Scola, the Catherine C; Mary Machado, Isabell and Joseph Lopez, Dorothy and Macalo Vagos, Irene Vagos, Francis Vagos

1942 Howard Liberman: 700+ (FSA/OWI) / 150+ images Gloucester. Gloucester names to search for: John Ribiera and his wife, the vessel Old Glory There are many portraits and most are not identified. Please help.

1940 Dixon: 350+ (FSA/OWI) / one image of Gloucester; headed the lab in DC

Occasionally when Stryker or the artist considered a photograph a reject, he would punch a hole through the negative.

TIMELINE FOR SOME SPECIFIC IMAGE CONTEXT (primarily pre 1950)1900W.E.B. Du Bois receives a gold medal at the 1900 Paris Exposition for curating and collaborating on a major exhibit featuring 500 photographs displaying the present conditions of African Americans

1908-1917

Along with an extensive visual archive, the FSA team was extremely versed and/or required to study images. One example: Lewis Hine, a NYC school teacher and sociologist who stirred American consciences with his photos. Margaret Sage, the widow of railroad magnate, Russell Sage, established an endowment to research social sciences still active today. Hine’s Ellis Island photographs landed a staff position with the Foundation. His work for them produced their first influential impact: the Pittsburgh Survey. From there, Hines was hired by the National Child Labor Committee and his photographs over the next decade were instrumental in changing child labor laws. Also Stieglitz, Charles White, Paul Strand, and many others.

1924

Russel Smith’s North America, Its People and the Resources, Development, and Prospects of the Continent as an Agricultural, Industrial and Commercial Area

1925

Tugwell with Stryker and Thomas Munro: American Economic Life

1931

Hines was hired to photograph the construction of the EmpireStateBuilding. Ironically, despite his importance and direct influence on future photographers, the arc of his career ends with hard times. He was not included with the FSA hires.. The reception of Hines work declined so much that he was forced to sell his house. MoMA rejected his archives. George Eastman House took them in 1951.

1930s/40s

Paul Robeson. Period–International influence.

1931

The continued influence of Margaret Bourke-White. Her professional career took off in 1927. FORTUNE magazine sent her to cover Russia which published Eyes on Russia in 1931.

1932

Huge audience for Mervyn Leroy’s movie I Am A Fugitive from a Chain Gang

1934

FORTUNE magazine sends Margaret Bourke-White to cover the Dust Bowl

1935

Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibits in the US

1935-1937

The Resettlement Administration Historical Section’s photographic project is tasked with documenting the crisis state of rural poverty. The government hires Roy Stryker. Stryker hires the photographers. Many other Federal creative arts programs.

1935

The government sends Dorothea Lange to photograph migrant farm workers in CA. Lange, Walker Evans and Ben Shahn already established careers when hired for the FSA but not household names.

1935

Berenice Abbott Changing New York

1936

In November, LIFE magazine’s large-scale, photo dominant iteration is first published. LIFE sold more than 13 million copies per week

1936

The Plow that Broke the Plains, Pare Lorentz with Pauls Strand, Steiner, others

1937

The movie adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s Captain’s Courageous is a huge hit.

1937

FSA/OWI Arthur Rothstein is sent to Gloucester. Depression era movie audiences purchased 60 million tickets per week.

1937

LOOK magazine starts publishing bi-weekly

1937

You Have Seen Their Faces, photo-book collaboration by Erskine Caldwell and Margaret Bourke White is wildly successful so much so that it pushes back the publication of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men by James Agee and Walker Evans (1941)

1937

The Resettlement Administration’s Historic Section folds into the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Stryker expands this photographic survey of Depression Era America, while publicizing the work of the FSA

1937/1939

Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men is published in 1937. The movie adaptation opens 1939.

1938

FSA group exhibit at the International Photographic Salon, Grand Central Palace, New York featured a selection of bleak but respectful images. Reviews felt that the photographers avoided negative stereotypes.

The tone of the exhibit was so influential that it was oft repeated. Stryker felt that well over ½ the images in the collection were affirmative and positive.

1938

Richard Wright hired for the WPA Writers Project guidebook for New York and wrote the part on Harlem. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship and was able to finish Native Son.

1938

Architectural Forum introduces Frank Lloyd Wright to American audiences. Managing Editor Ruth Goodhue was the first female at the head of any Time Inc publication, and a colleague of Stryker’s. Stryker credits RUTH GOODHUE* for propelling his encyclopedic quest to catalogue every day life with what sounds now like “a distinct sense of place”, 2014 placemaking terms. Her advice to Stryker echoes the later work of Jane Jacobs** “The Death and Life of Great American Cities”, the Main Street movement, and our current cultural district designations. Thirty years later Stryker credited numerous people, but he repeats his credit to Goodhue several times. Looking back, by the time 1940 rolls along, it’s Stryker’s creed. It’s thrilling how one inspirational comment can engender such a unique mobilization!

1939

An American Exodus, photo book collaboration by Dorothea Lange and Taylor

1939

FSA photos exhibited at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York City

1939/1940

Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath is published and is phenomenally successful. The 1940 movie adaptation is a blockbuster, too.

1941

Richard Wright and Edwin Rosskam produce Twelve Million Black Voices. Migration coverage went to the city.

1941

Movies Citizen Kane (trailer 1940) and How Green Was My Valley

1942

Artists for Victory

1942

Gordon Parks’ position within Stryker’s department is underwritten with the support of a Julius Rosenwald Fellowship. Rosenwald was a partner in Sears Roebuck. His foundation operated from 1917-1948 with the mandate to focus on the well-being of mankind and with a particular education outreach for African Americans. The endowment was to be spent down completely and it’s estimated that 70 million was given. Of particular note, from 1928-1948 open-ended grants were given to African American writers, researches, and intellectuals and the list is a Who’s Who of 1930s and 1940s. This is precisely the type awarded to Gordon Parks so that he could work at the famous FSA program.

1942

Gordon Parks in Gloucester May and June. Howard Liberman in Gloucester, September.

1943

May Four Freedoms Day; October 20 America in the War exhibits

1942-45

FSA absorbed by the Office of War Information (OWI), focus shifts to the domestic impact of WWII

1955

Edward Steichen’s Family of Man exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art includes many of the photos

1962

The Bitter Years 1935-1941: Rural America Seen by Photographers of the FSA

Edward Steichen’s last and seminal exhibit as Director of the Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to Stryker and the FSA photographers. As with other FSA themed exhibits, photographs by Gordon Parks– and many other artists–were not included, still aren’t included.

1990/2000s

Gees Bend quilts

*Roy Stryker on Ruth Goodhue

“Ruth Goodhue was the managing editor of “Architectural Forum.” Her father designed the very famous Nebraska capitol, a very unusual building. She was another one on my circuit. But I stopped to have breakfast with her, she was over at that time in the Chrysler Building with the Life complex there and I had breakfast with her and I went up to her office. She was the one that said — I’ll tell you this story because it’s how I reacted so often — “Roy Stryker, I wonder if all towns of 5,000 are alike, because they have the same boiler plate, they have the same radio programs, and so on?” Well, I had to go on a trip and when I got back I had an outline on small towns.” Also:

“She was a charming woman and very bright and very proactive. And she said to me, “Are all little towns in America alike because they read the same boiler plate, listen to the same radios on the air, and because they eat the same breakfast food?” Proactive questions, just what I needed. I have a very bad habit of writing memos to myself; I love to put things down, write a page after page and take it home. By the time I got back to Washington, the photographers hadn’t been taking pictures of the little towns they went through. So then there grew an outline — a perfect bombardment of twenty-five pages, I guess. Did you stay overnight? Let’s begin to cover the main street of America, you know, just to see what the heck occurs on it.”

**Jane Jacobs

As writer and associate editor of The Iron Age, Jane Jacobs published “30,000 Unemployed and 7000 Empty Houses in Scranton, NeglectedCity”, an article which brought attention to her home town. This led to more freelance work and in 1943 a job writing features for the US Office of War Information (OWI). After 1945 and into the 1950s, Jacobs wrote and was editor for the State Department’s magazine branch, primarily for Amerika Illustrated, a Russian language magazine. In the public sector she went on to Architectural Forum. I wonder if Goodhue was a mentor for Jacobs or if they had any overlap. I certainly consider the FSA/OWI files as formative for her ideas — and Goodhue influenced that program.

Gloucester connections:

Charles Olson

In New York City 1937, Charles Olson was hired by the government to work for the American Council of Nationalities Services, an agency that offered support programs for immigrants and refugees. He also wrote for the Office of War Information from 1942 – May of 1944. The timing overlaps with Jane Jacobs somewhat. Gloucester writer, Edward Dahlberg, introduced Olson to Alfred Stieglitz in New York City back in 1937.

Goodhue and Cram

Ruth Goodhue’s father, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, was a famous architect. Through his friendships with Ernest Fenollosa of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and others in the orb of the Boston Society of Arts and Crafts (1897), he met architect Ralph Adams Cram. Goodhue and Cram partnered to form a successful architectural firm, in business together for over twenty years. They had great solo careers, too.

Cram designed the Atwood Home, Gallery-on-the-Moors, in East Gloucester, and preliminary plans for the towers on Hammond Sr’s property, and the inspiration or more for Stillington Hall and others.

-Catherine Ryan / all photos Library of Congress, FSA/OWI black and white photography collection

Happy Birthday Catherine Ryan!!!

Catherine Charles & George Ryan @Kim Smith 2012Catherine, George, and Charles Ryan

Thank you Catherine for all the beautiful work that you do on behalf of Gloucester’s artists, arts, and the  community at large. With two bright and active twin sons, I don’t know how you manage to give all that you do! You are Amazing!!!

If you are at all involved with the arts in Gloucester than you know of Catherine Ryan. For those not aware, Catherine has the special appointment of The Mayor’s Representative on the Gloucester’s Committee for the Arts. In that role, she brings to the fore countless art related projects and endeavors. Additionally, she provides hands on and ongoing expertise to the Gloucester HarborWalk. Catherine is also an actively involved member of the steering committee for the Gloucester Harbortown Cultural District.

©Kim Smith 2012

Regular GMG readers know of Catherine too from her outstanding and informative steady stream of posts that highlight important cultural events and activities taking place in our community.

Catherine Ryan Mufy White ©Kim Smith 2014Catherine and Muffy White at this year’s Art Haven Buoy Auction

Thanks again Catherine and keep up the fantastic job!

Actually, Happy Belated Bday as Catherine’s birthday was two days ago.

Round Up of Top 2013 Local and National Art Stories: Advocacy

Hats off to Catherine Ryan for this amazing series!

THANK YOU CATHERINE!!!

Part One: ADVOCACY

The word “Creative” Replacing the noun ‘artist’ with ‘creative’ nearly mainstream, at least for the DIY and the art world!

National news, December 5, 2013: No, not Art Basel. Not the sale at Christies. It’s the Arts impact on the GDP. The National Endowment for the Arts and the US Bureau of Economic Analysis released results of their joint report announcing that the creative sector (2011) added 500 billion to the United States Gross Domestic Product. With this base number at last in place, the arts impact on GDP can be measured annually from hereon. The GDP measures the nation’s production of goods and services. Putting the pressure on and leading the stats, contributors included Hollywood film industry, cable TV production, advertising, broadcasting, the performing arts, publishing, independent artists, and design and architectural services. Other measurable indicators include production output and workforce. Analysts estimated the production output for the creative sector to be greater than 900 billion (where arts education including college departments joins the list), and 2 million plus folks working in the creative sector.

Read more of Catherine’s Round Up here: Read more

Round Up of Top 2013 Local and National Art Stories: Aplomb

image004Local and national common threads include advocacyaplomb, and access. Oh, and Amazon. December 5, 2013 was a huge news day. Here, aplomb (awards and institutions)

Part Two: PLOMB

Gloucester, MA:  the Gloucester HarborWalk designed by Cambridge Seven Associates took home an impressive array of local, regional, and national awards in 2013. Click this HarborWalk design page link and once there click the dash for ‘award winning walk’ to read more about the details.

2013 Highlighted with other Innovative MA Placemaking Spaces, Ma Smart Growth Alliance, ABX

2013 Pioneer in Partnership Award, Essex National Heritage Commission

2013 Eminent Waterfront Center Excellence on the Waterfront Awards

2013 Prestigious Gold MUSE Award from the American Alliance of Museums

2013 Golden Shoe Award from WalkBoston

2013 One of many key parts for downtown Gloucester receiving a 2ndMassachusetts Cultural Council Cultural District designation

2013  Kenneth E. Pickard Municipal Innovation Award from the Massachusetts Municipal Association

 

Gloucester, MA: The stellar Cape Ann Museum raises millions for upgrades

Gloucester, MA: Worth repeating, Gloucester has two cultural districts Rocky Neck and downtown’s Harbortown. Who knows, there could be five in Gloucester with all that is vibrant and historic within its Magnolia, Lanesville and Annisquam villages. The twoGloucester districts have been partnering with Rockport, and Essex. On the Northshore there is also Newburyport and Lynn. Salemand Ipswich can’t be too far off. Soon launching, the Cape Ann Cultural District mobile App will help pinpoint and navigate all four districts’ cultural destinations and other points of interest. The City of Gloucester and the towns of Essex and Rockport were awarded a grant from the MCC for the development of this new App.  The Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce and seARTS are key partners (join both!) The bulk of the required matching funds were provided by the City of Gloucester, through the Office of Mayor Carolyn Kirk and by partner organizations and municipalities.

AAA article and hot off the press Kim Smith’s wonderful Mott article

READ MORE “Round Up of Top 2013 Local and National Art Stories” from Catherine Ryan here:

Read more

Round Up Of Top 2013 Local and National Art Stories: Access

To Our GMG Readers: My apologies for our being behind in posting this series for Catherine Ryan. The following story, “Access,” is actually part three of a terrific three part series that Catherine wrote titled, “Round Up of Local and National Art Stories,” featuring the local and national common threads of advocacy, aplomb, and access.” We’ll start with part three,  Access, and work backward as this is great content relevant to our local artists and art scene.

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Round up of top 2013 Local and National Art Stories

Local and national common threads include advocacyaplomb, and access. Oh, and Amazon. December 5, 2013 was a huge art news day. Last up below: access (public).

Part 3 of 3: ACCESS

Open Content: Sometimes my research and work has required obtaining permission for images which can be an issue and expense. In 2010, I began to hear from more and more museum curators a growing rumble that the “barn doors would be thrown wide open”. That particular quote was the most memorable expressed to me, but all were variations on the same issue: public domain and open content. Joining the National Gallery of Art, Yale University, Los Angeles County Museum, and Harvard, in August 2013 the J. Paul Getty Museum announced its complete “commitment to sharing digital resources freely with all….It is now the mark—and social responsibility—of world-class institutions to develop and share free cultural and educational resources.” And with that bumped 4600+ eligible images on line and the bigger story and message went viral. This means optimum, quality digital resolution to linger, study, and copy– no more sour imprints and hassle for many works of art. Congratulations James Cuno—who has MA and Chicago ties. Google Art Project has a part in this shift. We’ll see whether this conversation increases in 2014, and other topics concerning museum goals and values (free admission– without allowing the institutions to decay, policy debates, etc).

National trends: Crowdsource funding remains strong and in the news. Spike Lee used Kickstarter, and here at home Felicia Ciaramitaro published the first gorgeous book of her Sicilian cookbook series. Local Rob Newton Cape Ann Community Cinema successful and oh so deserving Indiegogo campaign raised $54,000. Crowdtilt gained groundHigh Line ripple effect and references are everywhere and we all benefit. Amazon tries its hand at selling original art on line (while 20 x 200 closes). Maker movement/DIYcontinues to grow (Etsy, YouTube, and Pinterest).image002

Better programming and better websites: NEA, MOTT (above), Essex National Heritage…a long list of improved websites. Gloucester has this down, too, whether new events such as Cape Ann Ceramics Festival, curated by Susan Hershey, Jenny Rangan & Seyrel Williams, or mainstays amped up (see Maritime Gloucester Museum: Schooner Festival / lobster bake as one of many examples!) Ah, the floater home page!

Communication: I’m impressed by our local businesses, institutions, Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce and the Rotary; all combine to spread news, host, feature, and put up with plastering of flyers and the like to help the creative arts. Plus we are super lucky because local media covers the arts scene. Thank you, thank you WBUR, the Artery, Art New England, Boston Globe, seARTS newsletter, Cape Ann Beacon  and Gloucester Daily Times. Sadly for us but good news for Hamilton – Wenham, editor Jane Enos has left the Cape Ann Beacon for the ChronicleGood luck Jane! Welcome to the new editor, JC Lockwood!image003

When I think arts access, the award-winning blog  Good Morning Gloucester has to be the apex, having redefined shared community information, and yes arts guide. It has reached beyond our geography. One quick art example: Master Drawings from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts will feature a Gloucester snapshot of the house depicted in the Edward Hopper drawing, Double House which I identified and GMG shared.

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I have worked with this museum’s print and drawing department, and met Rev. Richard L. Hillstrom, an art collector who gave the Hopper drawing to the museum. Rev. Hillstrom put together a significant collection of religious prints and drawings for the Lutheran Brotherhood; not surprising with his knowledge and eye, with the collaboration of expertise of the print & drawings department (at that time the curators, former Director Richard Armstrong, Dennis Michael Jon, and others), and with the incredible holdings at this national treasure. In 2013, Jon juried the North American Print Biennial which was exhibited at Boston University. The Director of Prints and Drawings, Tom Rassieur has MA and NY ties.

Read more from Catherine, including information on where to apply to the Essex Heritage Grant program:

Read more

GloucesterCast 11/10/13 With Guests Kim Smith and Toby Pett and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

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GloucesterCast Podcast Taped 11/10/13 With Guests Kim Smith Toby Pett and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

Topics Include: Donuts from Brother’s Brew, Gloucester High Only Plays 7 Regular Season Football Games, Passports and Olive Kitteridge Filming, Frances McDormand and Bill Murray in Town, Toby’s Psychotic Dining Expectations, Sista Felicia bringing The Thunder, Mass Office of Travel and Tourism, Betsy Wall and Catherine Ryan

charting the paths for plastic soup patches of our oceans

Catherine Ryan submits

Hi Joey,

It’s not beach balls and rubber duckies. Great time lapse visualizations of how garbage moves around our oceans to the 6 largest patches (they used surface drifter buoys with GPS sensors).

“What we found is patches are international problem…It’s not that plastic from one country ends up in one particular patch; quite the contrary, all of the plastic ends up in all the patches and all are interconnected in a way we didn’t know before”. One big evolve take away: invent plastic that disintegrates. Less intimidating do it yourself adjustments: easy stuff at home here http://www.plasticfreeguide.com/

 

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More garbage patch info and docs worth a look: Look for this artful, full on feeling, elegiac nature doc from photographer Chris Jordan  http://www.midwayfilm.com/index.html image004

 

Or Angela Sun’s (still in progress) chatty, more entertainment tonight-like still unflinching delivery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pRy88R-4BI

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http://plasticparadisemovie.com/

 

In Gloucester all things eco green visit Maritime Gloucester and Oceans Alliance for their efforts, and the Farmer’s Market. Tons of GMG contributors and other local media. Plenty of volunteer clean up orgs. And see local artists’ work such as Karen Ristuben’s art (9 videos are here http://vimeo.com/user2947114/videos including:

Trash Calendar

Deposition of the Ocean as Witness

North Pacific Gyre Voyage

In Gloucester all things eco green visit Maritime Gloucester and Oceans Alliance for their efforts, and the Farmer’s Market. And see local artists’ work such as Karen Ristuben’s art (9 videos are here http://vimeo.com/user2947114/videos )

 

Look right here, too, GMG is stewardship—business, arts, nature, beauty, community! See Joey’s photography and posts: it’s not just Good Morning Gloucester, but Wake UP Gloucester! Look at the wide range of MA Green stories from lobsters to rosa rugosa http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2012/04/19/the-rosa-rugosa-is-starting-o-come-alive/ to solar powered lobster pot haul http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2013/07/20/video-next-generation-lobstermen-brett-and-jake-donovan-and-their-solar-powered-lobster-pot-hauler/. Then go right down the GMG mast head.

Kim Smith’s naturalist take whether how NOT to approach a seal or the indelible imprint on all butterfly musings evermore http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/wow-and-wondeful-150-milkweed-plants-ordered/

EJ’s sensitivity to our surroundings is there often—and she spreads awareness, most recently her OA posts –Jane Goodall! http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/ocean-alliance-and-jane-goodall/

Donna’s photography, too, and volunteer dedication  http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2012/02/26/what-community-is-all-about-burnhams-field-clean-up/, http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2011/06/10/one-hour-at-a-time-gang-city-clean-up-saturday/
And Fred, Marty, Kathy, Felicia, I mean ALL GMG. Reverent.

Local Updates- Engage!

Cat Ryan submits-

Hi all,

Here are few deadline events that may interest you, and some wonderful Gloucester news. So many updates are possible because of the strong support and lead from the City of Gloucester through the office of Mayor Kirk. Click the logos to follow the links—orange seems to be in fashion for these logos! What amazing partnerships surround us; please share the links with your friends. Good Morning Gloucester, the Gloucester Daily Times, the Cape Ann Beacon, Cape Ann TV and other local media have helped tremendously in spreading the word for our creative art, businesses, and orgs.

Sincerely

Catherine

  • image001-1November 14, 2013 FREE special conference on rising water issues and natural systems:  The Great Marsh Symposium at the Crane Estate, Ipswich, MA, Great House at the Trustees of Reservations, Ipswich, MA, hosted by The Great Marsh Coalition. Essex National Heritage is a member. There’s a tour from the great roof after! FREE

  • image002-1Wednesday, November 20, 2013, Smart Growth Alliance Conference at the ABX convention center, Boston. Celebrating Smart Growth projects across the Commonwealth and ten years of Smart Growth. I’m going as a participant. I’ll also be speaking about arts/culture updates in Gloucester for one of the panels. Gloucester’s successes via its Community Development department and the HarborWalk public spaces inspired this invitation.

  • image003-2Tuesday, December 3, 2013, Montserrat Gallery, Beverly: The Creative Economy of the North Shore (CEANS) is hosting a networking reception. Feature of the night: arts and culture curator, and non profit advisor, Ricardo Barreto, will speak about the NEA public art process that led to 75 nationally known artists submitting public art ideas. We’ll meet the artist awarded the project, too, Anna Schuleit Haber. FREE

  • image004 You may have missed Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce’s hosting for MOTT’s Director Betsy Wall. A big focus of this reception described the excellent platform of their website. Please add in your businesses and orgs ASAP—the North Shore and Gloucester can do more! If you have questions feel free to email me! Immediate exciting impact: MOTT has asked multi talented Gloucester resident and artist Kim Smith to be a guest blogger on their fantastic website. Also, her video of the schooner festival will be added to their YouTube channel. The Chamber is also working on a campaign for a Cape Ann license plate. They’re working with legislature to see if the restrictive parameters for logo design can revert to offering the entire background as part of a winning design (as we see with Cape Cod or the MA Environmental Trust’s Right Whale).

  • Nice press for downtown. image Harbortown Cultural District is featured in the November 2013 issue of their publication Horizons as part of a submission for one of its regularly published  “ten” lists. You can find the article here They introduce the ten districts as “the creative heart of many communities. Here are some in the region worth visiting.” The other districts on the list cover 7 states: New Haven’s Audubon Arts District, Philadelphia’s Avenue of the Arts, Lowell’s Canalway, New York City’s East Fourth Street, Providence’s Downtown, Hartford’s Downtown, Baltimore’s Mount Vernon, Portland’s Arts, and Pittsfield’s Upstreet. The article also credits the Massachusetts Cultural Council’s (MCC) cultural districts program. www.gloucesterharbortown.org. The author selected this district because of the HarborWalk.

  • INCREASE YOUR AUDIENCES    image007 Excellent podcast webinar from the Massachusetts Cultural Council on how to build audiences with ArtsBoston Audience Initiative project. The link also has a copy of the presentation if you don’t have time to listen. When you do find an hour to sit with the audio, there’s a lot of good information (and maybe one dog barking in the background at some point and one swear whoops!) There’s a sliding scale fee to sign up and share audience lists. Gloucester businesses/orgs should do it. Local mention: If you listen to the entire broadcast you’ll hear artist and seARTS Chair Jackie Ganim-Defalco ask a question and mention Cape Ann Artisans! Update: In September, the Massachusetts Cultural Council worked with legislatures to append the state budget, requesting an increase in $500,000 towards marketing. The request was tabled for now. But what’s important is the advocacy, the communication, and the ideas are out there! It is so important to share. Mention and coverage of arts and culture across many elections and in the media has significantly increased and improved.

  • image008US Travel Association. Please text to show your support for this Jolt Act. It affects Gloucester and all MA residents! I can’t believe that Brazil, Romania and Poland have trouble with visas! Text from your phone today 877-877, “travel”, and send to sign up for the Power of Travel coalition if you want to help there.

See Good Morning Gloucester coverage here

  • image009Essex National Heritage outstanding Essex Trails and Sails is not surprisingly already planning for next year. They were thrilled with Gloucester participation and the Block Party overlap, and hope to have even more partners and more promotion for 2014. Update coming soon and please plan for it next year! Their website and social media platforms are excellent opportunities.

  • image011November 1-17, 2013, save time for Cape Ann Community Cinema’s 6th Cape Ann Film Festival
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