Tag Archives: Caroline Haines

Hooray for Pathways for Children’s Brand Spanking New Butterfly Garden!

Pathways for Children we ©Kim Smith 2014HOLY CANNOLI and WOW–look how fantastically the Pathway’s Staff is taking care of their brand new one-month old butterfly garden–every plant looks well-loved!!!

Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden ©Kim Smith 2014 copy

Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden BEFORE ©Kim Smith 2014 copySpring 2014 Before Photo

Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden  After ©Kim Smith 2014.

Same View After Photo ~  July 18, 2014

Elizabeth's Toad ©Kim Smith

Toads Welcome!

My sincerest thanks to Caroline Haines for her vision to create a butterfly garden for the children at Pathways. 

Thank you to the many donors who have made the butterfly gardens at Pathways possible. 

Thank you to the Manchester Garden Club for their tremendous assisitance in planting the garden.

Thank you to the volunteers from Liberty Mutual for tearing out the old plantings.

And special thanks to Bernie Romanowski, Pathways for Children facilities director, for all his hard work and his extraordinary care and attention to detail, from the project’s inception through its continued maintenance. Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden Zinnia ©Kim Smith 2014. Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden Sunflower ©Kim Smith 2014.Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden Milkweed ©Kim Smith 2014.Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) ~ Notice the pretty moth nectaring from the milkweed in the upper right. The gardens are alive with pollinators of every species imaginable, including butterflies, bees, hummingbirds, songbirds, moths, and sundry insects!Bernie Romanowski ©Kim Smith 2014 copy

 Bernie Romanowski

Manchester Garden Club at Pathways ©Kim Smith 2014Manchester Garden Club

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Antennae for Design ~

The picnic table and trellis were designed to be stained a classic seaside blue. Why would we want to paint or stain the trellis and not simply allow it to gain a weathered patina? From an aesthetic point of view, the wood used for both the picnic table and trellis are two different types and will age very differently from each other. If this were a very large garden, it wouldn’t matter so much, but in a cozy garden room such as this, the difference will become quite noticeable and unappealing over time. Additionally, the blue will offset the flowers and foliage handsomely and is a cheery choice with children in mind.

From a very practical standpoint, untreated wood will quickly degrade in our salty sea air and neither piece will last more than ten years without protection. An opaque stain is the best solution because as the trellis and picnic table age, the obvious differences in wood will be disguised. An opaque stain also requires the least amount of effort to maintain over time. The architectural details were designed to be a coordinated focal point in the garden. Many, many have donated their time and provided generous funding to the garden and hopefully, the integrity of the garden’s design will continue to be honored by all.

Rotting untreated trellis ©Kim Smith 2014The above is a photo of untreated trellis, allowed to weather, and was installed approximately ten years ago.

_DSF8394 Pathways for Children Butterfly Garden school bus ©Kim Smith 2014.

New Butterfly Garden at Pathways for Children!

Pathways before -2©Kim Smith 2014Breaking Ground!

Pathways Before ©Kim Smith 2014Pathways for Children “Before” Photo

This week we broke ground for a butterfly garden at Pathways for Children. I think it has been several years since Caroline Haines, the COO of Pathways, and I, first began discussing the possibility of a pollinator garden for Pathways. Then in the summer of 2012 we had an amazing Monarch Butterfly program for the children, and believe me when I write that it was truly a fabulous event because it just so happened that very day, several of the caterpillars pupated right before the children’s eyes! Caroline, the teachers, and the students had the “bug.”

After meeting with Caroline, Pathway’s Bernie Romanowski, and teacher Sandra, we determined the best use of the space would be to create an outdoor classroom within the flowering pollinator garden—no easy task as the front elevation is one long narrow sliver of space. Fortunately, though, the front of the building also faces primarily south, which is ideal for planting the most fun and colorful of butterfly, bee, and songbird attracting plants.

Pathways Liberty Mutual Volunteers ©Kim Smith 2014Liberty Mutual Volunteers

Bernie secured a bobcat for exactly two hours and proceeded to rip out the overgrown and diseased trees and shrubs. Under Bernie’s direction, we were then joined by a dream team of volunteers from Liberty Mutual who, in less than five hours, completely transformed the front to the beautiful canvas you see below. A fence, two- foot wide trellised pergola, and table are yet to be installed. And, the Manchester Garden Club has graciously offered to lend a hand with the planting!

Bernie Romanowski ©Kim Smith 2014 copyThe Amazing Can-Do Bernie Romanowski

Pathways new butterfly garden ©Kim Smith 2014Our Canvas

Stay tuned for more updates to come!

Gloucester Kitty Adventure- Please Help Find The Owner

Hey Joey,
Here’s a GMG story for you. Last night a certain Kathy Santuccio was picking up a friend at Pond View Village when she noticed a stray cat. On her way to pick up her sister, she parked on the boulevard to call and let her know that she was on her way, when she heard a cat howling-underneath her car.  She called the police; officer George Carr responded with compassion and respect. That’s when I came along. We all looked under the rear of the car, illuminated by Officer Carr’s flashlight. Sure enough, we could see grey and white fur, but no face. The cat’s head was stuck facing front. Soon the area was protected by additional cruisers and Tally’s had arrived. With the help of the tall lanky Tally’s driver, Officer Carr extracted the cat, frightened but unharmed.
Long story short, I am holding the cat, and looking for the owner. See photo. It appears to be a well -cared-for neutered male with a tiny white tip on its tail.
Can you post his picture, so we can get to a happy ending?
Thanks!
Caroline Haines

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Caroline Haines Hearts

I loved JoAnn Hart’s piece about walking at Niles Pond. I, too, enjoy walking there, and as another walker said to me on Saturday morning, "it renews my spirit, and we need that today." As I walk, I find heart shaped stones-they fairly leap up at me, reminding me of the love underpining the universe. I set them along the path, in my own little public art displays.  I hope they speak to other walkers. Here are my two grandsons, Eli Hughes and Logan Do Carmo, checking out my work.  
Caroline Haines

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Multiple Rainbow and Sundogs Over Gloucester Photo From Caroline Haines

Hi Joey
I wanted to share the spectacular and unusual multiple rainbow phenomenon that was a harbinger of Hurricane Sandy late this afternoon over Gloucester Crossing.
There were three rainbows and two sundogs for a total of five! The rainbows were not parallel, but arced at different angles-it was like nothing I have ever seen in my sixty three years.
Caroline Haines

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Rare Albino Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Many thanks to Caroline Haines, the director of Pathways for Children, for forwarding the photos of the rare albino Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). The photos were shot by Kevin Shank and four of his sons over a several day period in late August. Caroline has a love for butterflies and birds, and nature in general, and brings her passion to the programing provided for the children at Pathways.

The above photos were taken in Virginia at the beginning of the hummingbird’s annual southward migration; it wouldn’t be unreasonable to think that we may see an albino hummingbird visiting our Cape Ann feeders and flowers as we are in the same migratory corridor.

A true albino hummingbird, as is the above bird, has snowy white plumage and it’s eyes, legs, and bill are pink. True albinos are extraordinarily rare. Leucistic hummingbirds are still rare but are seen more often than true albions. Like the common Ruby-throated Hummingbird, leucistic forms have black, feet, bills, and eyes, but their feathers are some version of white, gray, buffy, and tan; not the typical shades of green.

Leucistic form and common Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

Image courtesy Hilton Pond Center.