Tag Archives: Boat Building

Adventure Spars From Mike Dyer

Mike Dyer writes-

A small crew has been working on making replacement spars for the Schooner Adventure, at Harold Burnham’s yard in Essex.  Right now we’re working on the main boom.  These pics show a series of steps for putting together laminations of 12” X 2” Douglas Fir planks.  Note: we’re not done yet!

setting up the jig

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Bruce and Bernie cutting a series of scarfs on the stacked planks using a chain saw on a frame fit over the jig.

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Bernie after the first cut.

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the rough scarfs, later to be planed smooth and for the right fit.

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Bruce showing his clamped scarf joint.

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epoxied planks ready to go.

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all clamped up.

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Harold Burnham’s Shop

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Random Business Tweet of The Day- Laurie Fullerton Tweets About The Schooner Ardelle and Harold Burnham

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Part of the random local business tweet initiative I’ve started to encourage more local businesses to engage people through social media.  Every day a different tweet selected as an example to put a brand in front of people while offering some type of payoff.  Whether it be a laugh, a deal or something that leaves the end user glad they clicked through (the proper use of twitter)

Here’s the random local tweet of the day.  Click it!-

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Wooden Boat Enthusiasts: Boat Building Session with Craftsman Geno Mondello!!!

From the IDRC-

The GMHC is offering a boat building session with craftsman Geno Mondello for high school students (see attached flyer with contact information).  Please contact Tom Balf if your students would be interested in this unique opportunity!

Thanks, Erik Dombrowski

Maritime Gloucester Offers Teen Boat Building Course

Beginning on Tuesday, April 3rd, Maritime Gloucester is offering a new session of its boat building course for high school students. The course runs for eight weeks with classes scheduled on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 p.m – 6p.m. at the Dory Shop. Taught by Geno Mondello, the program gives participants hands-on experience in laying out, lofting and making full-sized patterns, making full-sized pieces and assembling and finishing a skiff. No prior experience necessary. The fee is $50. The course is limited to six participants. To register, call (978) 281-0470.

Contact:

Thomas Balf
Maritime Gloucester
Phone: (978) 281-0470
tbalf@gloucestermaritimecenter.org

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Hurry, Space is limited!!!!!!

Dory Raffle Last Night At The Heritage Center

Last night the Dory Raffle was held at The Maritime Heritage Center.  The International Dory Rowers Organization is full of very committed and friendly people who volunteer time and energy to continuing this great Gloucester tradition.

One of the best things about this group is their commitment to bringing regular folks who might otherwise not have any real connection or financial way to get out on Gloucester Harbor a way to really feel connected to it.

I know I’ve said it a million times but for a measly $50 you get to use the boats all year long.  It’s the best bang for your buck in the the whole city.

Katherine Richmond conceived the idea to have an authentic handline dory built and to sell raffle tickets which would help pay for some of the costs to keep this tradition alive.  Geno Mondello donated his time to build the dory.

A FOB, Brian the creator of the Brooklyn Blog A Movable Bridge drove all the way from Brooklyn yesterday to be on hand for the raffle in which he was sure he was going to win.

Great Gloucester People Doing Great Gloucester Things.

I have about four clips from last night which I’m in the process of uploading.

For now you can check out this video which was taken this past winter of Geno building the dory-

Click The Picture To View The Video-

Here is the completed Dory-


Phil Bolger Boat Design

Here are another set of plans to build a boat similar to the Robin Jean but with the cabin pushed forward which would accommodate a larger work area and deck space.

Click on the plan and select “all sizes” to see it in more detail

Phil Bolger Boat Design, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

You can see the difference in the Robin Jean with its wheelhouse more toward midship than the plan up above which calls for the whellhouse and cabin to be pushed forward.

Geno Mondello’s Dory Shop Whirlygigs

Geno sells these for $55.  A bargain for something hand crafted, painted, and local.  It’s even painted the official colors of the Lunenberg/Gloucester Dorys. There was one left last week so hurry down and get it!  Look for the last part of the Geno Mondello interviews coming tonight.

Geno Mondello’s Dory Shop-The Knees Of The Dory

Inside the dory the knees are placed as a frame.  It is interesting to note as Geno told me in the first part of our video interview that the knees are made from the tree trunk.  The tree trunk has a natural bend when it enters the earth which lends strength to where the curve is going to be on the inside of the boat.

Geno Mondello’s Dory Shop, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

Geno Mondello’s Dory Shop

I stopped by Geno’s Dory Shop at The Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center yesterday.  Geno is currently working on a 17 foot hand line dory which will be auctioned off to benefit the Gloucester International Dory Race Organization.  The money raised through the raffle will be used to build more dorys.  Last year there were four dories and by the end of this year there will be eight.  The sport is just taking off thanks to the likes of Jimmy Tarantino, Glen Harrington, Katherine Richmond, Skip Levielle, and Kirk Dombrowski along with many other volunteers..

Look for my three part video series with Geno starting tomorrow which talks about the origins of dory racing, different types of dorys and how they are built and other surprises.

Geno Mondello’s Dory Shop, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

Huge Mistake

Huge Mistake, originally uploaded by captjoe06.

Don’t ever do this to yourself. Unless you have a gazillion dollars(and if you have a gazillion dollars you could buy a shiny new boat).

What I’m talking about is this big huge boat that some poor guy fell in love with. He probably got a great deal on it because it was in poor shape and said to himself that with a little work he could make this old boat new again. A dream many people have.

The problem that most people don’t figure on is the cost to tie these huge boats up, and the cost to renovate something this huge by the time you get done with it you could have gone out and bought someone else’s mistake that they already sunk way too much money into and will never recover.

I feel for this guy. As time goes on and he continues to make the dockage payments and dump incredible amounts of money into this beast he is gonna be scratching his head saying “what did I get myself in to?”

Or maybe hes a masochist and enjoys the inflicted pain that this type of project ends up bringing on one’s self.