Tag Archives: birds

Birds?

Janet and I have three parakeets, Merry, Pippin, and Jack. I had no familiarity with birds until I met Janet, but now I do. Caged birds need heat, food, and water to survive. I learned all this from her. Before I left for work today I checked on them, and I smelled something like burning. It was a space heater, so I replaced it with another one. Not only am I attached to these birds, but I've also learned to like the wild birds outside as well. I hear them every morning communicating with our birds. It's a sweet sound. We put seed outside for the Swallows and Bluejays. Unfortunately, the water in the bird bath was frozen today.

Janet and I have three parakeets, Merry, Pippin, and Jack. I had no familiarity with birds until I met Janet, but now I do. Caged birds need heat, food, and water to survive. I learned all this from her. Before I left for work today I checked on them, and I smelled something like burning. It was a space heater, so I replaced it with another one. Not only am I attached to these birds, but I’ve also learned to like the wild birds outside as well. I hear them every morning communicating with our birds. It’s a sweet sound. We put seed outside for the Swallows and Bluejays. Unfortunately, the water in the bird bath was frozen today.

Cape Ann TV Soars with the Premiere of BirdWatcherTV – Thursday 8:30pm

Check out this news release from Cape Ann TV’s Lisa Smith about a brand new show premiering Thursday @8:30pm.

Bird Watcher TV's Host Robert Sherman

Bird Watcher TV’s Host/Producer Robert Sherman

Did you know that birds from the Arctic tundra and birds all the way down to the grasslands of Argentina visit Cape Ann each year?  Join BirdWatcherTV host Robert Sherman, also producer, videographer and editor of this series, as he travels around Cape Ann in search of wild birds.  Along the way, you’ll meet the people who watch birds, feed birds, study birds or who are just plain crazy about birds.

Gloucester resident, Robert Sherman is a naturalist, who works as a park ranger and natural history interpreter for Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. His interest in ornithology/bird watching began during his college years when he was a geography major at UMass-Amherst. Robert has been leading birding tours in Massachusetts since the early 1990s.  SEE PREVIEW HERE

In this new series Robert captures the natural beauty of Cape Ann and its stunning wildlife on camera. Robert was trained in television production at Cape Ann TV and used its editing facilities and field camera equipment to produce BirdWatcherTV. Cape Ann TV Production Coordinator, Lisa Smith states, “Robert is very dedicated to this project. He created this program over the past few months in his “down time” and made a remarkable first-time documentary on the birds that inhabit Cape Ann. You can really tell that this a labor of love. We are look forward to Robert’s next program highlighting the Cape Ann Winter Birding Weekend that occurred earlier in February.” Robert said he hopes viewers of BirdWatcherTV, “gain a greater appreciation of the beauty and diversity of what is so close to home, and I want to encourage people to get outside and enjoy nature.”

BirdWatcherTV premiers this week and airs on Cape Ann TV Channel 12 on Thursday, February 21 at 8:30 p.m.; Friday, February 22 at 3:30 p.m.; Saturday, February 23 at 8:00 p.m.; and Sunday, February 24 at 8:00 p.m.

Brace of Baffled Buffleheads

photo of buffleheads

Photo by E.J. Lefavour

Did you know that the Bufflehead, (a small diving duck, mostly white with glossy green-black to purple-black head and back), was first described in 1758 by Carolus Linnaeus, Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist. They nest almost exclusively in holes excavated by Northern Flickers and, on occasion, by Pileated Woodpeckers. Unlike many ducks, it is mostly monogamous, often remaining with the same mate for several years. A group of ducks has many collective nouns, including a “brace”, “flush”, “paddling”, “raft”, and “team” of ducks. Buffleheads are one of my favorite shorebirds and I watch for their arrival in late fall. They are little, very cute and have the coolest name. I don’t know if these are actually baffled, although they did look a little confused in the snow trying to find each other.