Tag Archives: Bees

The Beauty of Pollination

Sunflower and Bees ©Kim Smith 2013Bees Pollinating Sunflower

Friends and GMG readers share the most beautiful treasures, including the following film, sent in by Mary Weissbaum. Mary writes, “The hummingbird doing rolls chasing a bug is neat! Watch closely and check out the baby bat under its mama (@ ~2 min, 38 sec). Unreal !! If you never knew what goes on in the garden when you aren’t paying attention, watch this – some of the finest filmography you will ever see.” Thank you Mary!

I have posted this video before and think it is worth seeing again, and again!

Europe Bans Bee-Harming Pesticides

Europe took a significant step as a majority of EU member states voted for a partial ban of three bee-killer pesticides. This, despite fierce behind-the-scenes lobbying from insecticide firms Syngenta and Bayer.  “A series of high-profile scientific studies has linked neonicotinoids to huge losses in the number of queens produced and big increases in “disappeared” bees – those that fail to return from foraging trips. Pesticide manufacturers and UK ministers have argued that the science is inconclusive and that a ban would harm food production, but conservationists say harm stemming from dying pollinators is even greater.” (The Guardian, UK).

Sunflower bees Sailor Stans ©Kim Smith 2012

It  is a landmark vote and was supported by petitions signed by millions of people.  Although it is only a two year ban, the hope is the ban will give the beleaguered bee a break, and allow time for reexamination of data. Under the EU measures, restricions on the following apply: for treating seeds, soil and leaves on flowering crops attractive to bees such as corn, sunflowers and rapeseed (the source of canola oil). The products may still be used on crops like winter wheat for which the danger to bees is deemed to be small. Use by home gardeners will be prohibited.

The three banned insecticides are imidacloprid, thiametoxam, and clothianidin. The neonicotinoid I see commonly listed on pesticides that are readily available to the home gardener is imidacloprid. I urge every home gardener not to use pesticides. I don’t use them, ever, in my own garden, and never in both the private and public gardens that I design and maintain. Several years ago, I reported that Alain Baraton, the head gardener at the Palace of Versailles stopped using pesticides at the palace gardens. Within the year, a natural balance began to take hold in the gardens, including the return of songbirds to the gardens which in turn eat the insects. If the no-pesticide policy is successful at Versailles, which receives millions upon millions of annual visitors, a pestide ban can certainly be implemented for our private homes and public spaces.

Korean daisy for bees©Kim Smith 2011

A dear friend of mine, Heidi Kost-Gross, is Vice Chair of the Natural Resources Commission for the Town of Wellesley (garden club readers–she is also President of the Federated Garden Club of Massachusetts). Heidi has been instrumental in pesticide reduction throughout Massachusetts. The Wellesley Natural Resources Commission has created an outstanding Pesticide Reduction Resource Guide for Citizens and Municipalities of Massachusetts, which is available for free to distribute anything found in the guide.

Magnolia virginiana Eastern Carpenter Bee Kim Smith 2011 copy

Magnolia viginiana and Eastern Carpenter Bee

Flowering Dogwood

Is there a tree more lovely in flower than the North American native dogwood?

Whether flowering with the classic white bracts, the stunning rubra bracts, or the less often seen pale, creamy rose-tinted bracts, our native dogwood (Cornus florida) never ceases to give pause for beauty given.

NATIVE TREES SUPPORT NATIVE POLLINATORS!

At this time of year when traveling along southern New England roadways we are graced by the beauty of the dogwood dotting sunny roadside borders where meets the woodland edge. The bracts and flowers emerge before the leaves, serving only to heighten their loveliness. The fresh beauty of the bract-clad boughs is offset by the impressionistic symphony of tree foliage unfurling, shimmering in hues of apple green, chartruese, moss, and lime peel.

*Bract – A bract is a leaf-like structure surrounding a flower or inflorescence. The colorful bracts of poinsettias, the hot pink bracts of bougainvillea, and the bracts of dogwoods are often mistaken for flower petals.

The open florets (pea-green colored) and unopened buds are surrounded by the rose red-shaded bracts.

Read about how to help prevent an attack by the lethal dogwood anthracnose. Read more

Hips Left after Rose Petals Fall Off

Click this text for the link to my tribute to Rosa Rugosa

Click this text for my Rosa Rugosa Life Cycle Slide show

In the right of the picture you can see the rose hip which is what is left after the flowers fall off of the stems. The rose hips are the fruit which people used to make jam out of in the old days. In a couple months the rose hips will turn orange-red from the present green color.