Tag Archives: ACLU

GloucesterCast With Peter and Vickie VanNess and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 4/16/14

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GloucesterCast With Peter and Vickie VanNess and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 4/16/14

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Topics Include: Gloucester MA, April 16 Snow, Peter VanNess, Vickie VanNess, Peter Lovasco Doing a Great Job With Cape Ann Weather, Bitstrips, Kevin Edson, Rice Cooker Hoax, Boston Strong, ACLU, Dog Leash Controversy, Bad Dog Owners,Beach Trash Barrels vs Carry In/Carry Out,  Larcom Theater, UU Meetinghouse, Henri Smith, Jon Butcher Axis, Celebrate Gloucester, Red Tape For Community Events, Castleberry Fairs, Block Party, Jackie Hardy, Tourism, Fun Should Not Be Illegal, Gran Prix of Gloucester, Cyclocross, I4C2, Downtown Parking Is Not Bad if You are Willing To Walk One Block (Which Is Less Walking You’ll Do If You Park In A Mall Parking Lot and Walk Into The Mall), People That Will Drive In Circles 20 Times Unless They Get A Parking Spot On Main St vs Parking On Rogers or Middle St, Stitcher App, Cross Platform, BossJock App, Email Subscription Service Is Broken, Explaining Hyperlinks, Sister Felicia, Shalin Liu, Embedding A Video, Get Her A Muzzle.
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Check Out Peter and Vickie At www.gimmelive.tv

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ACLU Publishes Guides To Photographer’s Rights

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Know Your Rights: Photographers

Taking photographs of things that are plainly visible from public spaces is a constitutional right – and that includes federal buildings, transportation facilities, and police and other government officials carrying out their duties. Unfortunately, there is a widespread, continuing pattern of law enforcement officers ordering people to stop taking photographs from public places, and harassing, detaining and arresting those who fail to comply. Learn more >>

Your rights as a photographer:

  • When in public spaces where you are lawfully present you have the right to photograph anything that is in plain view. That includes pictures of federal buildings, transportation facilities, and police. Such photography is a form of public oversight over the government and is important in a free society.
  • When you are on private property, the property owner may set rules about the taking of photographs. If you disobey the property owner’s rules, they can order you off their property (and have you arrested for trespassing if you do not comply).
  • Police officers may not generally confiscate or demand to view your photographs or video without a warrant. If you are arrested, the contents of your phone may be scrutinized by the police, although their constitutional power to do so remains unsettled. In addition, it is possible that courts may approve the seizure of a camera in some circumstances if police have a reasonable, good-faith belief that it contains evidence of a crime by someone other than the police themselves (it is unsettled whether they still need a warrant to view them).
  • Police may not delete your photographs or video under any circumstances.
  • Police officers may legitimately order citizens to cease activities that are truly interfering with legitimate law enforcement operations. Professional officers, however, realize that such operations are subject to public scrutiny, including by citizens photographing them.
  • Note that the right to photograph does not give you a right to break any other laws. For example, if you are trespassing to take photographs, you may still be charged with trespass.

If you are stopped or detained for taking photographs:

for the rest of the piece click here