Category Archives: Working Boats

BREAKING NEWS: Science All Around Us Has Raised Over $31K!!!

Science All Around Us has raised $31,483.00, with six days left to go. They are in the home stretch. Be a part of the tremendous team of people backing this worthy endeavor (283 so far!). Click here to donate to Science All Around Us with Collin Keagan.

Collin talks about his interest in aviation in this video

For more information see previous GMG posts here:

Check Out Science All Around Us with Colin Keegan

Science All Around Us Has raised Over 18K

Breaking News for Science All Around Us

GMG Podcast with host Joey C and guests Donna Ardizonni and Kim Smith

If you have already donated, you can continue to help by spreading the word to reach as many people as possible during the fundraising campaign. Let your friends and family know about this exciting series and share the links on Facebook and Twitter.

 

BREAKING NEWS for SCIENCE ALL AROUND US!

Science All Around Us Hits the $25,000. Milestone

Congratulations to the Science All Around Us Project and Their Team of Awesome Backers!!!

 

9 Days and Ten Thousand More to Go!

 

To learn more and to donate, visit the Science All Around Us Kickstarter Page here.

 

See links below in the preceding post for more information and videos about this project.

 

Science All Around Us Hits Another Milestone and Are Two Thirds of the Way Towards Making Their Goal!

When last we reported on Tuesday evening, Science All Around Us had reached the halfway point towards their fundraising goals. We are so excited to share that in only four days, through the generosity and good faith of of 223 backers, they have raised another $6,000.00, bringing the new total to $24,336. Science All Around Us is a project truly worthy of our donations.

To learn more and to donate, visit the Science All Around Us Kickstarter Page here.

We showed parts one and two of Colin’s recent interview, the following is part three

For more information see previous GMG posts here:

Check Out Science All Around Us with Colin Keegan

Science All Around Us Has raised Over 18K

If you have already donated, you can continue to help by spreading the word to reach as many people as possible during the fundraising campaign. Let your friends and family know about this exciting series and share the links on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Science All Around Us Has Raised Over $18K Surpassing Their Halfway Point!

This is wonderfully exciting news not only for Captain Tom, Colin, and Nubar, but for our community at large. If you haven’t yet backed their Kickstarter program to raise funds for the the pilot of the series, Science All Around Us, the first of which will be created aboard Gloucester’s own Schooner Thomas E. Lannon, now is the perfect time. With less than two weeks to go, the project will not go forward unless the full $35,000. needed for the pilot is raised.

Read More About the Project from Captain Tom Elliis and Joey Here

If you have already donated, you can continue to help by spreading the word to reach as many people as possible during the fundraising campaign. Let your friends and family know about this exciting series and share the links on Facebook and Twitter.

More from Colin on the Science All Around Us

 

 

Bring on the Rain – I Know Where I’m Going

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I considered posting a gloomy photo of rain running down a window pane. That could be depressing and sappy, but it’s not my style. When rain and storms block in the way, don’t slow down, stay the course. Move forward to where you want to go. During a rainy Gloucester Schooner Race, Captain Steve Douglass looks ahead, consults his charts, and sees beyond the rain. I do not look at the rain dripping down the glass, but rather navigate as Captain Douglass does: Carry on toward your destination. I welcome the impending rain.

You have just crossed over…into the Twilight Zone

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A parallel world, very similar to ours here in Gloucester, exists in Bayfield, WI, on the shores of Lake Superior. It has Bodin Fisheries, a commercial fishing boatyard, and even a bar called the Rum Line. Check out Bodin’s “Wild Caught Lake Superior U.S.A.” product list: http://www.bodinfisheries.com/price-list.html. If you’re tired of cod and halibut, try Bodin’s Burbot or whole whitefish.

Chickity Check It- Northeast Ocean Data Interactive Maps

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There are a ton of different layers you can add to the map and adjust.  Lots of interesting data.

Check It!-

http://northeastoceandata.org/maps/commercial-fishing/

This is just one-

Overview

This map broadly characterizes commercial fishing vessel activity in the Northeast based on Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data from 2006 through 2010 (full calendar years). In general, vessels holding permits in certain fisheries are required to use VMS.1 See www.nero.noaa.gov/vms/regs/index.html for additional information, including a link to federal regulations describing requirements for the use of VMS.

This particular map is for vessels using VMS and declared into the NE multispecies fishery plan. The relative amount of vessel activity is indicated qualitatively from high (red) to low (blue). Importantly, this data was intended for fisheries management purposes supporting law enforcement initiatives: NMFS describes VMS as “a satellite surveillance system primarily used to monitor the location and movement of commercial fishing vessels in the U.S.” The map does not distinguish between fishing activity, vessel transit, or other vessel activities. The most accurate interpretation of this map is that it indicates relative levels of vessel presence.

The relatively short timeframe of this map precludes consideration of historic fishing areas. It also does not illustrate more recent or future changes in fishing activity resulting from changing environmental and economic conditions, fisheries management, and other important factors.

Data Considerations

The data provided by NMFS contained the day/month/year, the geographic coordinates of the vessel at the time of transmission, and the vessel’s declaration code, which may signify fishery plan, program within that plan, and associated area identifier or gear-type information. These data then were aggregated by combining all program codes within each fishery plan.

The limitations of the data used to produce these maps should be understood prior to interpretation of this map.

These data are from vessels operating in certain fishery management plans and certain programs within those plans. This map displays data for vessels using VMS with a limited access multispecies permit fishing under a Category A or B Days-at-Sea or catch regulated species or ocean pout while on a sector trip, or those with a limited access NE multispecies small vessel category or Handgear A permit that fish in multiple NE Multispecies Broad Stock Areas (50 CFR 648.10).

It is important to note that these data include all trips using a NE Multispecies VMS code by vessels with these permits, and as such, may include trips that target other fisheries but use a NE Multispecies VMS declaration for another fishery as a management and reporting mechanism. There are many New England fisheries not described through any VMS-derived maps.

VMS data is subject to strict confidentiality restrictions. Therefore, the map shows vessels’ locations following the removal of data that would have indicated individually identifiable vessel positions.

Eagle’s Lesson

JanetEagle096wm Eagle4740wmAfter photographing USCG barque Eagle Friday afternoon, I wanted to take the deck tour on Saturday morning. The boarding ramp didn’t look like it would be too steep for my rollator at 9:30 am, low tide. But when I approached the stairs, I knew it would be a challenge. Both the ramp and steep stairs would have to be walked without the aid of my four–wheeled walker. I got on the ship with hard work and a sailor standing by. The main deck was fascinating and crew was fun to talk to, including officer candidate Flores, my tour chaperone.

The climb up the stairs disembarking Eagle was exhausting, especially going up. Two crew members guarded me against a fall in back and in front of me. On the last two steps, I asked for and got a “lift.” They were very happy to help me, and it was welcome. I thanked them for an excellent physical therapy session. Once on terra firma, my legs were shaking. I had pushed myself to the limit. When I heard the distant blasts of Eagle’s horn as she departed this afternoon, I realized what the experience was all about: I had challenged the stairs to stop me, and they could not.

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