Category Archives: eastern point

Report Monarch Sightings Here!

Monarch Butterfly Gloucester MA ©Kim Smith 2014More Monarch sightings reported on Cape Ann by GMG readers over the past several days, October 14th and 15th!

Monarchs640Maggis Rosa submits this photo from The Scientist Magazine, which was their Image of the Day and was shot by Luna Sin Estrellas at El Rosario Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, where the butterflies are arriving earlier than usual and in greater numbers than last year.

photo (2)To the reader who sent the above photo, I unfortunately accidentally deleted the email. Please forgive and please let us know your name and where the photo was taken. Thank you!

Ed Note: Nancy Dudley writes, “The photo in the post w/o a caption was at the Essex Shipbuilding Museum. We are seeing a couple a day this week. Thanks! I am looking for the milkweed seeds I got from you to plant in my marsh soon!”

Monarchs on the Wing ©Kim Smith 2014The Monarchs are back! Cape Ann GMG FOBs are continuing to report their Monarch sightings.

After taking a break during the rain of last week (butterfly’s wings don’t work very well in foul weather), the Monarchs are again moving through our region. Check the comment section to see all the recent sightings in our community. The above photo was taken yesterday, Monday, October 6th on Eastern Point. The photo below was shot last week, before the rain’s onset.

Monarch in flight ©Kim Smith 2014Monarch in Mid-Flight and New England Asters

Tip ~ This morning I ran into my friend Maggie and her husband who had just rescued a Monarch from the middle of the road. Butterfly wings don’t work very well in cool temperatures. If you find a Monarch in a seemingly quiet and weakened state, it could quite possibly simply be cold. Place the butterfly in a sheltered and sunny spot and it may very well revive!

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In 1975, in Angangueo, at the time when the butterflies winter grounds were first located by Mexican citizen Catalina Aguado and her American husband Ken Brugger, they not only discovered billions roosting on the limbs of the oyamel fir trees but also millions quietly at rest on the forest floor. Thinking that the butterflies were dead, some members of the discovery group brought the butterflies back to their homes. Later in the day, after the butterfly’s flight muscles had warmed, they awoke and began to fly. Today at the butterfly biosphere reserves it is against the rules to pick up or touch a sleeping butterfly.

Monarch Butterfly Nectaring Joe Pye ©Kim Smith 2012Joe-pye Weed (Eupatorium)

In Sunday’s podcast (September 21st), Joey made the super suggestion to create a place where GMG readers can report their Monarch butterfly sightings. I’ll repost this post every night for the next week or so. Please report any sightings to the comment section of this post, that way we can keep all sightings in one collective spot. You can send in a photo capture if you’d like, too.

Today as I was leaving our home, around noon time, I spotted a Monarch in our garden in East Gloucester. Let us know what you see. Thank you!

Monarch Butterfly Eastern Point Gloucester ©kim Smith 2012

 

Brace Cove Seals Sleeping at Daybreak

Brace Cove seals at sunrise ©Kim Smith 2014While filming B-roll for several projects I caught the sunrise at Brace Cove this October morning. The seals were awakening, as were the swan couple, the cormorants and gulls stretching wide their wings, and the songbirds breaking fast on the abundance of wild berries and seed heads found along the berm at Niles Pond. Click image to see full size.

Brace Cove seals at sunrise -2 ©Kim Smith 2014Brace Cove Seals

Brace Cove at sunrise ©Kim Smith 2014Fledgling juvenile male cardinal ©kim Smith 2014Juvenile Male Cardinal

Niles Pond daybreak ©Kim Smith 2014Niles Pond

Sparrow ©Kim Smith 2014Camouflaged!

Question for Paul M: Do you think the pale pink in the sky is a faint glimpse of the Lunar Eclipse?

Niles Beach sunrise ©Kim Smith 2014Click to view larger

I went looking for the eclipse this morning Paul M. It was way too overcast (as you predicted), but the colors of the sky over Eastern Point, facing west, were very unusual, for sunrise. The panorama was taken at Niles Beach, in the direction towards where the setting moon would be, at around 7:15 this morning. Do you think the bright light and pinkish color in the sky is a reflection from the setting Blood Moon?

 

Eastern Point Light

Eastern Point Lighthouse

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Eastern point lighthouse 1832

Eastern point lighthouse 1832

 

 

Read more here  http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=476

Http://Art-Rocks.org

Wave Reflections

Wave Reflections

 

I didn’t notice the reflections on the side of this Beautiful boat until I viewed it on the computer.

I took these from the Thomas Lannon.

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Http//:Art-Rocks.org

Fodor’s names Gloucester one of New England’s Most Picturesque Towns

Check out last Friday’s Fodor’s article listing Gloucester in their 15 of New England’s Most Picturesque Towns.  Here’s what they say about Gloucester

About an hour north of Boston on Cape Ann, Gloucester is the country’s oldest seaport and predates Boston and Salem. It was established as an English settlement in 1623, and today you can visit historic houses like the Cape Ann Historical Association. Gloucester’s scenic beauty has attracted many artists, including Winslow Homer, William Morris Hunt, Mark Rothko, Maurice Prendergast, and Edward Hopper. The Rocky Neck Art Colony—the first settled artist colony in the U.S.—has many contemporary artist studios and galleries.

Snapshots from Recent Treks Around Eastern Point

Gloucester Skyline ©Kim Smith 2014Gloucester Skyline Winter Sunset

In preparation for my adventure to Mexico to film the Monarchs, nearly every afternoon I have been “hiking” around Eastern Point. According to my car odometer, from the Niles Beach parking lot to the lighthouse and back is just a little over two miles. I realize that I must look fairly comical with headphones, hiking boots, and loaded down with a full backpack, all while trying to dodge the black ice. The walk is always beautiful–the freezing temperatures and icy roads not so much!

Raymond's Beach ©Kim Smith 2014Raymond’s Beach Sunset

Raymond's Beach Cherry Tree ©Kim Smith 2014Raymond’s Beach Cherry Tree

Rosa rugosa Raymond's beach ©Kim Smith 2014Rosa rugosa

Eastern Point Lighthouse sunset ©Kim Smith 2014Eastern Point Lighthouse

Check out my first post for the Essex County Greenbelt!

Milkweed Eastern PointMilkweed Patch at Eastern Point Lighthouse

Rockporter Patricia Mandell, who helps the Essex County Greenbelt by volunteering for Mary Williamson, Director of Communications, suggested to Mary that perhaps Greenbelt would be interested in reblogging the posts that I write for my blog, Kim Smith Designs, and for GMG; posts that are relative to the Cape Ann ecology. You have read my “World’s Easiest Method of Propagating Milkweed” here on GMG and can now find it on the Greenbelt blog. Check out Greenbelt’s blog and website for a comprehensive view of who they are and of all the good they accomplish, their properties, maps, projects, and events.

Reminder: Ken Duckworth Hosts the Writer’s Book Club on Sunday November 17th

Ken Duckworth ©Kim Smith 2013Ken Duckworth is not only preparing an array of seasonal appetizers, he is also leading the discussion!

Eastern Point Lit House Fall Book Club Calendar

November 17: Ken Duckworth leads a discussion of The Book by Alan Watts. SOLD OUT

Ken Duckworth is the award-winning executive chef of Duckworth’s Bistro, where he focuses on local, seasonal ingredients that supports local industry. Following his passion for all things food, he honed his culinary skills at Saddlebrook Resort in Tampa and The Cloister in Georgia. He has been our gracious host for this series and we are so pleased to have him leading our last discussion of the year.

 

Seaside Goldenrod in Autumn

Seaside Goldenrod in the Wind Good Ha ©Kim Smith 2013rbor Beach GloucesterSeaside Goldenrod in the October Wind and Mist ~ Good Harbor Beach 

Monarch Butterflies mating seaside goldenrodMonarch Butterflies Mating ~ Seaside Goldenrod in September

See Previous GMG posts featuring Seaside Goldenrod ~

How to Tell the Difference Between a Male and Female Monarch Butterfly

Where Are All the Monarchs?

Where Do Swans Go in Winter?

A reader emailed inquiring as to where do the Niles Pond swans go during the winter months. The Niles Pond swans are Mute Swans (Cygnus olor) and they are neither mute nor migratory. They do not fly south in the true sense of a great migratory distance traveled, but do move around between bodies of water, and may move to a slightly warmer region.

Mute Swans swans grunt, snort, and hiss and their wingbeats make a beautiful throbbing sound when flying. See previous GMG posts about the Niles Pond Mute Swans ~

Vibrant Throbbing Wingbeats

Niles Pond or Brace Cove

Schooner Roseway

Schooner Roseway ©Kim Smith 2013

Click to view larger

While searching though my photo library, I discovered a batch of stills from the Schooner Festival that I have not yet posted because I was so intent on editing the Schooner Festival video. I’ll try to post them this weekend–if everyone hasn’t already had enough of schooner photos!

The Schooner Roseway is a National Historic Landmark, owned and operated by World Ocean School, which is located in Camden, Maine. She is a gaff-rigged schooner and was first launched from Essex in 1925.  The Roseway runs sails out of Boston during the summer and out of Savannah, Georgia and St. Croix during the winter months.

If you have sailed on the Schooner Roseway, I would love to know about your experience. Please leave a comment in the comment section. Thank you!

History of the Roseway from the World Ocean School website: 

In the fall of 1920 a Halifax, Nova Scotia, newspaper challenged the fisherman of Gloucester, Massachusetts, to a race between the Halifax fishing schooners and the Gloucester fleet. Therefore many schooners, such as Roseway, built at this time were not strictly designed for fishing but in order to protect American honor in the annual races.

Roseway, 137′ in sparred length, was designed as a fishing yacht by John James and built in 1925 in his family’s shipyard in Essex, Massachusetts. Father and son worked side by side on Roseway, carrying on a long New England history of wooden shipbuilding. She was commissioned by Harold Hathaway of Taunton, Massachusetts, and was named after an acquaintance of Hathaway’s “who always got her way.” Despite her limited fishing history, Roseway set a record of 74 swordfish caught in one day in 1934.

Read more about the history of the Roseway here

 

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