Category Archives: Captain Joe’s

Updated With Release Location and Map!: Second Tagged Lobster Landed At Captain Joe and Sons

Update6/25/14

Joey,

This is great information, I appreciate your continued support of the tagging program, thanks to many of you this tagging project has been a great success, we’ve obtained recapture information on 24% of the lobsters that were tagged.  This is a very good reporting rate, and although we have yet to analyze all the data we’ve collected, we do have some preliminary results to share.  Out of the 2,200 lobsters we’ve tagged, lobstermen have provided recapture information on 525 lobsters.  Though finer scale movements within the state of NH are extremely important to this study so that we can properly assess seasonal migrations, perhaps the most interesting tag returns have come from Massachusetts.  Since tagging began in 2012, approximately 50 lobsters have been reported in Massachusetts waters, four of which were caught off of Cape Cod and traveled nearly 100 miles.

The lobster that you reported was tagged on 6/16/2013 near the Isles of Shoals and it was a female.  At the time the lobster was tagged it measured 79mm which is sublegal.  Approximately a year later the lobster you reported moved approximately 45 miles (straight line distance), molted and was legal size when caught.  The majority of tagging for this project has been completed; however, we’re very interested in receiving recapture information as long as lobstermen are observing these lobsters.  Thanks again for your support and let me know if you have any additional questions.  I’ve attached a map from Google Earth so you can see where the lobster was tagged and recaptured.

Thanks,

Josh

Joshua T. Carloni

Lobster Biologist

Marine Fisheries Division

NH Fish and Game…connecting you to life outdoors

www.wildnh.com, www.facebook.com/nhfishandgame

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Matt Cooney Landed This Tagged Lobster A Couple of Days Ago

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A couple of years ago Dave Jewell caught one and when we contacted the NH Fish and Game authority who was responsible for the tagging program they gave us all the information about where it was released, when it was released and how far it had travelled.  Hoping to get the same feedback on this one.

This was the one Dave caught two years ago-

NEW HAMPSHIRE FISH AND GAME LOBSTER TAGGED AND RELEASED ON 9/21/12, CAUGHT BY OUR LOBSTERMAN DAVE JEWELL IN GLOUCESTER ON 11/12/12

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Dave Jewell skipper of the Lady J came in a couple of nights ago and handed me this tag which was attached to a lobster and the coordinates of where he caught it off Gloucester MA on November 12, 2012.

There was a telephone number on the other side of the tag which I plugged into Google and it came up as the number to New Hampshire Fish and Game.  So I then Googled New Hampshire Fish and Game Lobster Tag and came up with this result

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So then contacting Josh Carloni from New Hampshire Fish and Game’s Lobster Tag program I asked him more about the program and if there was any info he could give as to where the lobster that Dave caught was released or if we could put together a google map to show how far it traveled from September 21st to November 12th-

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If you have a press release about it or a google map of where certain lobsters were released and where they have been reported, that would be something that would get people excited.  anything visual has great impact.

an interactive google map would be really fun.

especially if you can put this particular lobster on there from where it was released to where it was caught.

Dave caught the lobster at Lat/Long 42.41.8/ 70.25.4

This was the info from Joshua about when it was released and the program itself-

Joey,
That lobster was tagged on 9/21 near the Isles of Shoals (42 57.186, 70 35.823), it was a female spent egger with a v-notch and it was 93.8mm.  I just had someone put your coordinates into google earth and it appears that lobster moved 20 miles.  If you would like to add something to your blog that would be great.

We’re trying to identify areas in New Hampshire with aggregations of large reproductive females and then track their movement.  It appears the Isles of Shoals area has a large number of large females with eggs and we would like to know why they are there and their associated movement.  Though we’ll be looking a variety of other information from this study, this is the major objective.  We’ll also be tagging smaller females and some males so that we can compare their movements with the larger animals and identify if they’re undertaking seasonal migrations.

We hope to tag a total of 2400 lobsters by November of  2013.  So far we’ve tagged approximately 550 lobsters and we have recapture information from approximately 70 lobsters.  A couple of lobsters have been reported travelling to the Gloucester area and two more lobsters were reported in the Portland ME area.  We really want to spread the word so that fishermen will report tags when the catch them.  There will be a raffle held in 2012, 2013 and 2014 and winners of the raffles (three winners each year) will win a 50 dollar gift certificate to New England Marine Industrial or a Grundens sweatshirt

Dana Johnson Created This Google Map Showing Where The Lobster Was Tagged and Released and Where Dave Caught It 7 Weeks Later After Traveling 20 Miles-

Click Map For Larger View-

LobsterTracking

My suggestion to Josh is instead of simply having a page where the fishermen can report lobsters caught with tags that he create a page with maps and info of every lobster released and caught with the names of the fishermen that caught them so they can generate more interest in the results with the fishermen as well as the general public and the people who are funding the studies.

What’s Your Favorite Leftover Lunch?

What’s your favorite leftover lunch? My husband’s is lasagna. Please write and let us know!

Here’s my move: Go to Duckworth’s Bistrot and, for the first course, order Chef Ken’s sublime Crispy Polenta with grilled portabella mushrooms, spinach, and creamy mushroom sauce. This is fairly filling. For the main course, ask for a full serving of their famously fabulous Lobster Risotto, which is served with a medley of fresh seasonal vegetables. You will be so full after only eating a third and won’t possibly be able to have another bite. No worries though because it makes the most magnificent leftover lunch the following day!

Duckworth's Lobster Risotto ©Kim Smith 2014

Notice all the chunks of lobster meat. Duckworth’s Lobster Risotto is so chock-filled with Captain Joe’s fresh-caught lobster, you won’t have any trouble partitioning off some for your sumptuous leftover lunch.

 

 

Our Quadruple Pincer Clawed and Blue Lobster Has Company With Today’s yellow Lobster!!!

Yellow Lobster-Blue Lobster-Quadruple Pincer Lobster All Landed In Gloucester at Captain Joe and Sons

 

Crazy, right?  There’s Nowhere that you can go to see these three lobster mutants in the same place let alone same lobster crate but we’ve got them her at our lobster dock, Captain Joe and Sons In Gloucester

Way More Pictures and Video when you click below this first picture-

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Reminder: Monarch Milkweed and Aster Seed Pickup and Information Day is Next Sunday, May 18th, from 9:30 to Noon

male-female-monarch-butterfly-marsh-milkweed-2-c2a9kim-smith-2012-copy Male and Female Monarch Butterfly on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Where are the Monarchs today in their northward migration? They have spread throughout the Great Plains and Southern States. Some have already been sighted as far north as Michigan and Wisconsin! Monarch Migration Map

Our Milkweed and New England Aster seed pickup day is next Sunday from 9:30 to noon at Captain Joe and Sons. Captain Joe’s is located at 95 East Main Street and you can find directions posted on their website here. Thank you so much to Joey for offering to host the event at the dock. See You There!

monarch-new-england-aster-c2a9kim-smith-2013Monarch Butterfly and New England Aster

ORDER YOUR MILKWEED SEEDS TODAY!

The order for milkweed seeds and asters in being placed on Monday so please get your orders in before then. Thank you!

Thank you so very much to everyone participating in the Cape Ann Milkweed Project! Lots more good information to come!

Monarch Caterpillars Eating Common Milkweed ©Kim Smith 2012JPGMonarch Caterpillars Munching on Milkweed

Ordering information:

Please note that the milkweed seeds are available in two different species and two different quantities. Please place your order amounts in the comment section of this post as follows:

Your Name, Your Email Address (optional), and Seed Type and Quantity.

For Example:

Pippi Longstocking, villavillkula@gmail.com

1 Packet Common Milkweed  3.50

1 oz.  Marsh Milkweed 15.00

2 Packets Pink New England Aster @ 3.50 ea. =  7.00

My order total: $25.50

We are not collecting money ahead of time for the seeds. The orders are placed entirely by the honor system. Last year we did not have a single stiff and I will accept cash or check at the time of pick up. Seed pick up and information day will be Sunday, May 18th, from 9:30 to noon, at Captain Joe and Sons.

The packets of milkweed seeds (200-300 seeds) are perfect for a relatively smallish patch.

The larger ounce quantity is ideal for planting larger areas. On average, plan on 50 seeds per square foot. If your patch is 10 feet x 10 feet, that equals 100 square feet, and would require approximately 5,000 seeds.

Additionally, we are also offering pink and purple New England Aster seeds. I’ve never grown New England asters from seed, but have read that they are relatively easy to start (although slow to germinate). New England Asters make a beautiful border and will not only offer sustenance to southward migrating Monarchs, but in late summer also provide nectar for myriad species of bees and butterflies.

SEEDS

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca

Seed Packet (300 seeds) 3.50

1 ounce (4900 seeds)  12.00

 

 Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Seed packet (200 seeds)  3.50

1 oz. (5,200 seeds) 15.00

 

Pink New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae variation)

Seed Packet  (1000 seeds) 3.50

 

Purple New England Aster (Aster novae angliae)

Seed Packet (1750seeds) 3.50

*    *    *

Why is it so important to plant milkweed for the Monarchs? Milkweed is the only food plant of the Monarch Butterfly caterpillar. The Monarch Butterfly migration is in serious peril due to loss of habitat in the United States by the use of Monsanto’s genetically modified Roundup Ready corn, soybean, and sorghum crops. Global climate change is also a factor in the diminishing migration. We can all help mitigate some of the destruction by planting milkweed and nectar-rich wildflowers.

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is the milkweed we see most typically growing in our dunes, meadows, roadsides, and fields. It grows quickly and spreads vigorously by underground runners. This is a great plant if you have an area of your garden that you want to devote entirely to milkweed. It prefers full sun, will tolerate some shade, and will grow in nearly any type of soil. The flowers are dusty mauve pink and have a wonderful honey-hay sweet scent.

monarch-caterpillars-common-milkweed-c2a9kim-smith-2011Common Milkweed and Monarch Caterpillars J-shape

Marsh Milkweed (Aclepias incarnata) is more commonly found in marshy areas, but grows beautifully in gardens. It does not care for dry conditions. These plants are very well-behaved and are more clump forming, rather than spreading by underground roots. The flowers are typically a brighter pink than Common Milkweed.

Monarch Butterfly marsh Milkweed ©Kim Smith 2012Marsh Milkweed and Monarch Butterfly

New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae) is a hardy late summer blooming perennial that grows approximately 36 inches to 60 inches. New England asters prefer wet to medium soil, grow well in full sun, and will tolerate part shade. 

New England Aster and Monarch Butterfly ©Kim Smith 2014New England Aster

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