Search Results for: fisk

Fiesta goes on for days, but the FISK open house is only June 28 from 2-6pm. Every music lover should be there.

For any lover of music, these open houses are a treasured experience you will never forget (see posts about Fisk here).  You can literally walk INSIDE the organ while it’s being played by top organ players, who come to these open houses to test them out.  And it’s FREE.  Save the date now and don’t miss this one.

You are cordially invited to join us at our Gloucester workshop

to celebrate the creation of two new pipe organs–

Saturday, June 28
2pm – 6pm
C.B. Fisk, Inc

21 Kondelin Road
Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930
978 283-1909  • www.cbfisk.com
click here for map

Fisk Documentary Screening

Dear Joey,

You and everyone in GMG land are invited to join us for any of three screenings of the new documentary “To Hear the Music,” an hour-long film about C. B. Fisk, Inc. the Gloucester organ building company. It focuses on our founder Charles Fisk, the workshop community he fostered, and the organ we built for The Memorial Church at Harvard University, dedicated at Easter 2012. Film maker Dennis Lanson and his professional crew have created a PBS-quality document which beautifully captures the history of the company and all that goes into each organ we create.  Folks will find further information and a trailer at: www.tohearthemusic.com .

Screenings include: Saturday, September 14th at Cape Ann Community Cinema, Gloucester, 2:30 and 5PM http://capeanncinema.wordpress.com/advance-tickets/

And Thursday, September 19th at Shalin Liu Performance Center, Rockport, 7PM. Free Screening. http://www.rockportmusic.org/cinema-events/9-19-13.html

There will be a Q&A with Dennis and yours truly after each screening. We will hope to see you there.

Greg Bover

http://www.cbfisk.com

Video- Making Mast Hoops for Schooner Adventure at C. B. Fisk.

Greg Bover submits-

Dear Joey,

Perhaps our readers would be interested in the video Joanne Souza shot of making mast hoops for Schooner Adventure at C. B. Fisk.

Geoff Deckebach, Bill Holmes and I started by sawing strips of ash 10 feet long, 1-1/8” thick and 1-3/4” wide, tapered at both ends. We steamed them for about an hour and a half and then went ahead as shown to make the two foot diameter hoops. These hoops go around the masts, about 20 on each one. The new sails will be tied on to the rings, or “bent on” as we schoonerheads say, and that allows them to be raised or lowered.

We are one step closer to actually sailing Adventure for the first time in almost two decades. It is a privilege and an honor for me to be able to help with the effort to return this icon of Gloucester to the sea.

Regards,

Greg

image

C.B. Fisk Time Lapse Installation

Dear Joey,
Fans of C. B. Fisk might be interested in the time lapse photography of our
recent installation at Indiana University in Bloomington. It is an
instrument we built in the 1980′s in California in a concert hall that the
client built onto the back of his house. He died a couple of years ago and
we were asked to find a new home for the organ. Last year we disassembled it
and moved it to Indiana where it’s been in storage waiting for preparations
to Alumni Hall to be completed. I went out in March with a crew of five and
we worked 60+ hours a week for more than five weeks to put it all back
together. It’s 30 feet tall, weighs more than 30,000 pounds, and is the
third Fisk instrument at the Jacobs School of Music, which boasts the
largest organ department in the country. It has been a particularly
interesting project for me personally because the original 1987 project was
one of the first times I served as project manager. How fortunate I am to be
able to revisit some of my early work and see what has changed and what has
remained the same. I have a great job.
Here’s what it looked like in California, below, and what it looks like now
in Indiana. This the link to the YouTube time lapse video

shot by an IU student.  Note the incomparable walnut carvings by Gloucester’s own Morgan Faulds Pike.
Regards, Greg Bover

Fisk open house last week

A week ago, C. B. Fisk had an open house and demo of an organ they recently finished and are shipping off to it’s destination in Japan.

The open house was well frequented, with lots of local people coming and going, munching on the tasty tidbits that were being offered and taking tours of the facility.  Organ students and other people from the organ’s destination in Japan were on site as well, some playing the organ and others strolling through the workshop.  I planned on getting lots of photos, but ended up in several engrossing conversations instead…  I got a few more photos of the workshop last year when I got a fascinating tour from my friend Rick Isaacs.  I continue to be amazed by the versatility and skill of the artisans at Fisk!

- Fr. Matthew Green

 

C.B. Fisk Open Shop Invitation March 9th, 2013

Greg MF Bover writes-

Dear Friends and Family,

Although I will be away on another installation in Indiana, my Fisk Colleagues will be ready to show folks around the shop and answer any questions during this event.  We are expecting a large contingent of visitors from the school in Niiza, Japan where this organ will be going, I hope you will come see this unique organ too.

Please feel free to bring along anyone you think might be interested, or to forward this invitation along to your own friends.

Regards, Greg

141 Open Shop Invite - Email

Lutefisk


Good Morning Gloucester FOB Al Bezanson wrote a very funny response to my post of several days ago, Mystery of the Disappearing Soap, which if you don’t read the GMG comment thread, you would have missed.  Al’s response, “It is undoubtedly a Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Only creatures with ethnic roots from that region take pleasure in dining on soap. I know this because I have visited that country and had the experience of eating lutefisk. Be warned — we are approaching the season when you may be offered this delicacy.”

Never having had the occasion to try lutefisk, I wanted to know more about it but, after reading only the wiki article, needless to say I don’t think I ever will.

From wiki “Lutefisk is made from aged stockfish (air-dried whitefish) or dried/salted whitefish (klippfisk) and lye (lut). It is gelatinous in texture, and has an extremely strong, pungent odor. Its name literally means “lye fish.”

The process is described further:

“The first treatment is to soak the stockfish in cold water for five to six days (with the water changed daily). The saturated stockfish is then soaked in an unchanged solution of cold water and lye for an additional two days. The fish swells during this soaking, and its protein content decreases by more than 50 percent producing a jelly-like consistency. When this treatment is finished, the fish (saturated with lye) has a pH value of 11–12 and is therefore caustic. To make the fish edible, a final treatment of yet another four to six days of soaking in cold water (also changed daily) is needed. Eventually, the lutefisk is ready to be cooked.”

I can’t resist including several of Garrison Keillor’s hysterical comments on lutefisk, also found in the same wiki article:

“Every Advent we entered the purgatory of lutefisk, a repulsive gelatinous fishlike dish that tasted of soap and gave off an odor that would gag a goat. We did this in honor of Norwegian ancestors, much as if survivors of a famine might celebrate their deliverance by feasting on elm bark. I always felt the cold creeps as Advent approached, knowing that this dread delicacy would be put before me and I’d be told, “Just have a little.” Eating a little was like vomiting a little, just as bad as a lot.”

and

“Lutefisk is cod that has been dried in a lye solution. It looks like the desiccated cadavers of squirrels run over by trucks, but after it is soaked and reconstituted and the lye is washed out and it’s cooked, it looks more fish-related, though with lutefisk, the window of success is small. It can be tasty, but the statistics aren’t on your side. It is the hereditary delicacy of Swedes and Norwegians who serve it around the holidays, in memory of their ancestors, who ate it because they were poor. Most lutefisk is not edible by normal people. It is reminiscent of the afterbirth of a dog or the world’s largest chunk of phlegm.

This morning Al posted a more detailed account of his experience with lutefisk.

“As sleuth David Simmons pointed out those tooth marks suggest mouse, but until this case is concluded I would at least maintain Rattus norvegicus as a critter of interest. Perhaps I was a bit hasty in assigning the blame. Who knows, r n may have actually decided to immigrate to the New World to escape Viking cuisine.

In connection with this I will relate how I came to know about lutefisk. It was 1966, at the Grand Hotel in Tromso, and following the customary social hour, or two, I sat down to dine with a local fellow. I had been poking about the country for several weeks on fishery matters and fancied myself to be quite knowledgeable about seafood. He took the cue and ordered up a lutefisk dinner for me. I’ll say that Garrison Keillor was spot on with his descriptions of this delicacy. While I waited for my substitute entrée Lars told of the recipes used by backyard lutefisk makers. Old bathtubs were in demand for the process and I thought he said soaking times were measured in months, not days. This is all vivid in my memory – perhaps in the same part of my brain that stores details of where I happened to be at the time of catastrophic events.

And Fred – thanks for your invitation – Phyllis and I will be paying you a visit.”

My note: The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus), also known as the brown rat, is native to northern China. The species found its way to Eastern Europe by the early eighteenth century. By the year 1800, they occurred in every European country. First sightings of    R. norvegicus in the New World occur in the 1770′s as ship stowaways. Today, Norway rats can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

Images courtesy google image search

Fisk Documentary almost done

 

image

About the Project:

"The Opus 139 Project: To Hear the Music" is a documentary entering its final editing stage that celebrates great music, great craftsmanship, and the unique workplace ethic at C.B. Fisk, Inc. The completed film will tell the interwoven stories of founder Charles Brenton Fisk, his workshop in action, and the enterprise of creating, installing, and voicing a single new pipe organ, in this case Opus 139, commissioned by the late beloved Peter Gomes, for his magnificent Memorial Church at Harvard University.

It is a rare opportunity to be able to document and experience the intricate design process, attention to detail, and stunning craftsmanship involved in the construction of this "King of Instruments." In the last act, the soaring glory of the new organ at Harvard, Opus 139, will be heard at its inaugural concert. The Opus 139 Project is a film about the evolution of a single pipe organ, 3 years in the making, and needs to raise $15,000 in 31 days to complete production. Timeline for finishing is May 2013.

This is, has been, and will be a labor of love, rather than a for-profit project.

Sincerely,

Dennis Lanson, Director/Producer & the Opus 139 Project Team.

Kickstarter link here

C. B. Fisk tour

Last week, Rick Isaacs was kind enough to give me a behind-the-scenes tour of the C. B. Fisk workshop where he works.  They are internationally renowned pipe organ builders, and their facility in West Gloucester shows why.  I was really impressed by the way they make much of the organ practically from scratch – they combine a wide variety of skills and disciplines to go from lumber and ingots all the way to a complete organ.  Their workspace is filled with neat tools and personal touches.  Here are a few of the photos I took. The complete set is available here.

Greg Bover (well known on this blog) working on the design of an organ:

When contracts are signed, designs turn into models (many of which are on the top shelf in this office):

The models are amazing in their own right:

Read more

Open House Today at C.B. Fisk!

Reminder: Open House today from 2 to 6 PM to celebrate the completion of Opus 143, a two-manual, 21-stop organ. C.B. Fisk is a premiere and internationally recognized builder of organs. Their workshop and headquarters are located in Gloucester. If you have never been to an open house at the C.B. Fisk workshop, you are in for a very special treat. Delightful music provided by guest organists trying out the new instrument may be heard throughout the afternoon and refreshments are typically served. Opus 143 will then be dismantled, shipped to it’s new home in China Grove, North Carolina, and then installed there.

The photo is of the 1/16 scale model for Opus 143

C.B. Fisk is the first (and I believe only) American company to have ever been awarded the commission to design and build an organ for a European cathedral.

Cathedrale de Lausanne, Switzerland

C.B. Fisk is located at 21 Kondelin Road, Gloucester. Phone number: 978.283.1909


Rick Isaacs, Organ Builder, Design Engineer C.B. Fisk Part IV

Rick explains why ivory is no longer used in the creation of the organ keys

side note *this video was edited with Windows Live Movie Maker* for comparison to Apple’s iMovie.

The C.B. Fisk Open House will be November 13 from 2-6PM

for more info-

C B Fisk Open House Invitation and OPUS 137 Video Part III

Dear Joey,

Here’s our open house invitation again which I hope you will find time and space to run again towards the end of the week, I hope you’ll stop in too. We expect to have several hundred people at our shop on Saturday, especially since this organ will be going to a church so close to home lots of Andover parishioners will also show up. There are tours of the shop at 2:30, 3:30 and 4:30 and folks are invited to play the organ as well.

By the way, thanks so much for your support of the Sawyer Free Library, it is much appreciated. The Board and staff work hard to give Gloucester the library it needs.

Regards,

Greg

I’d love to see Willie  “Loco” Alexander jam out on the OPUS 137

CBFISK_OPUS137_eVite_final

Greg Bover Shows How An Organ Is Designed At C. B. Fisk Part I

This is part of a multi part video series we will run this week in anticipation of the Saturday Nov 13th Open House in which the public is invited to play the organ and see the masterpiece in person.

For more information-

http://www.cbfisk.com

C B Fisk Open Shop Party To Celebrate Opus 137 November 13th

 Dear Joey,

As we do at the end of the construction phase of every project, we are having an Open Shop at our place on Kondelin Road, just off Magnolia Avenue, in the Cape Ann Industrial Park. The party runs from two o’clock to six o’clock on Saturday, November 13. We’ll be showing off our newest pipe organ, Opus 137 for Christ Church, Andover.

The picture below is of the design model we made in 1 to 16 scale. The organ itself stands 25 feet tall and weighs 11 tons. It is quartered white oak in an Arts and Crafts inspired style for this beautiful Richardsonian Romanesque church.

Folks can come and play the organ or just listen, get tours of the entire 25,000 square foot shop, and see how we create these enormous instruments from scratch. Even little kids are fascinated by the place.

Thanks for helping us get the word out, we appreciate it.

Regards,

Greg

Gregory R. Bover
VP Operations, Project Manager
C. B. Fisk, Inc
www.cbfisk.com

image

C. B. Fisk, Inc. cordially invites you to our workshop
to see and hear Opus 137
A two manual, 32 stop organ for the
Parish of Christ Church
Andover, Massachusetts
Saturday
November 13, 2010
2 PM – 6 PM
21 Kondelin Road
Gloucester, MA
Rte. 128 to Rte. 133, East 1 mile
Right on Magnolia Avenue, 1 mile
Right on Kondelin Road, 1/2 mile
http://www.cbfisk.com
978.283.1909

« Older Entries