Monthly Archives: May 2014

Bob and Dave’s In the Bottom Floor Of The Beacon Marine Basin Is A Worthwhile Visit

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Exciting New Film Assignment for the Berkshire Museum and Milkweed Seed Mailing Update

Dear Friends,

Happy Memorial Day Weekend! I hope today finds you with friends and family and enjoying beautiful weather!

I have wonderful news to share about an upcoming exhibit at the Berkshire Museum in which I have been hired to create a film about butterflies in flight. The title of the exhibit is, what else—Butterflies! They have also purchased 26 of my butterfly photographs. Additionally, during the exhibit, my interview film with Tom Emmel will be running on a continuous loop, as will the new short film about butterflies in flight. And best of all, screenings of my full-length Black Swallowtail film and Monarch film will be shown during meet the filmmaker events. This is a fantastic educational project, with a 5,000 square foot exhibit space, which will also house live butterflies. It’s a truly hands-on exhibit, designed with children and adults in mind!

“Butterflies” is scheduled to run through August and will most probably be extended though September. I am attending the opening this coming Friday, May 30th and will take photos and bring you more information about the Berkshire Museum and the exhibit.

Our Cape Ann Milkweed Project went without a hitch and was lots of fun. Most picked up their seeds and if you sent a self-addressed stamped envelope, your package is ready to mail Tuesday morning. So many thanks to Joey for sponsoring the Cape Ann Milkweed Project at Captain Joe and Sons. Thank you so much to everyone that participated, and most importantly, the Monarchs (and myriad other species of pollinators) thank you!!!

Happy Spring Planting!

DSCF3768Monarch Butterfly and Hellenium

Flags waving on the Blvd. and the Memorial Day Cermony

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Memorial Day is not just the start of summer, cookouts and a day off it is much more than that.
May 21, 2014 flags waving on the blvd.

Live from Good Harbor Beach

The overcast sky isn’t stopping hundreds from enjoying a day at the beach! Sent from Xfinity Mobile App

Live Blogging from Cape Hedge Beach

The sun is out, the wind is starting to subside, the beach is scattered with about 6 families, and we can back to school/work in the morning with one beach day under our belts and sand in our flip flops :)

Getting My Happy on at The Studio

Ok, friends, summer can start.  We’ve finally hit the deck at the Studio.  And…it did not disappoint.

I went to one of the “soft openings” at the Studio back in the fall and have been eagerly anticipating clocking some hours there ever since.  Being the long weekend…and Thatcher’s birthday to boot…Saturday was the day.

We went by boat.  Out of Rockport Harbor, around Halibut Point, down the Annisquam River, under the A. Piatt Andrew, and on into Gloucester Harbor….where we were greeted by the Thomas E. Lannon (a sight that never gets old).

We ate some manchego cheese in olive oil (which I could eat every day for the rest of my life), tuna maki rolls, the red dragon roll (maybe one of my favorite sushi rolls of all time), fish and chips, and some pork ribs.  Everything was delicious….as was my cocktail (a muddled grapefruit something or other) and the decadent dessert that was brought over by our waiter (equally as decadent…kidding..kind of) for Thatcher’s birthday.

We went inside briefly to visit with some friends and it was hopping!  It was crowded in that “everyone is giddy that summer is here and they’re enjoying awesome food and cocktails with friends” kind of jovial way.  My favorite kind of way.

I can’t get back there soon enough and highly recommend that you do the same!

NO EXCUSES!

NO EXCUSES!

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My Dad

Paul F Frontiero Sr

5/03/1925 to 1/13/2012

GLOUCESTER — Paul Francis Frontiero, Sr., 86, of Gloucester, passed away on Friday morning, January 13, 2012, at the Addison Gilbert Hospital.
Born in Boston on May 3, 1925, he was the son of the late Joseph and Anna (Lovasco) Frontiero. During World War II, he had served in the U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1946 as a Seaman 1st Class and Boatcoxswain.
Paul was very proud of his service and had fought in numerous campaigns including landing Marines in the first wave of the invasion of Japan where prisoners from six nations were waiting for them on the docks. For his service he was awarded the American, Asiatic and Pacific medals, Philippine Invasion and Liberation medal, Japan Occupation and Victory medal with three Battle Stars.
As a young man, Paul began fishing with his father and had worked on many boats as an engineer, cook and doryman. He later gave up fishing to raise his three boys and began his career as an artist. Paul was an accomplished artist and his works hang in many private collections around the world.

http://www.stateoftheartgalleryandsculpturegarden.com/FSFRON.html

From my brother Joe;

“My dad never talked about the war much until he got older then it all came back to him. The nightmares and even guilt of watching so many die and him surviving. He was proud but haunted by it. I never realized what is what like for him until I saw that opening seen in Saving Private Ryan and it was just as he described. He was 17 when he enlisted. He had already spent a number of years fishing for weeks at a time to help support his parents. He was one of those members of the greatest generation. Miss you dad!”

Top left; Paul Frontiero Sr 1943

Top Right; My father in his LCVP LSD-17

bottom left: My Father with a Japanese work party. He would ferry them around to different sites.

He would also sneak them fruit when he could.

He was also in the first wave to enter japan after the surrender.

bottom right; Burials at sea.

dad service colage

The Boston Navy Yard and the USS Wabash

The Boston Navy Yard was established in 1801 in the Charlestown neighborhood of Boston. The facility built 130+ naval warships, including the USS Constitution in 1814. The Frigate USS Wabash is seen here serving as a receiving or barracks ship, which she did from 1876 until being sold in 1912. The 30 acre Navy Yard is now part of the Boston National Historical Park and home of "Old Ironsides," the oldest commissioned warship in the world.

The Boston Navy Yard was established in 1801 in the Charlestown neighborhood of Boston. The facility built 130+ naval warships, including the USS Constitution in 1814. The Frigate USS Wabash is seen here serving as a receiving or barracks ship, which she did from 1876 until being sold in 1912. The 30 acre Navy Yard is now part of the Boston National Historical Park and home of “Old Ironsides,” the oldest commissioned warship in the world.

Frigate USS Wabash was built in 1855 as a steam and sail powered top of the line fighting ship. The 301 foot long Wabash carried 50 guns. She's pictured in this 1863 photo during Civil War duty.

Frigate USS Wabash was built in 1855 as a steam and sail powered top of the line fighting ship. The 301 foot long Wabash carried 50 guns. She’s pictured in this 1863 photo during Civil War duty.

Gordon Parks Gloucester photos Memorial Day 1943

Cat Ryan submits-

FSA/OWI photograph in the Library of Congress

Gordon Parks Gloucester photos Memorial Day 1943-

Gordon Parks, Gloucester Massachusetts. Memorial services for fishermen lost at sea.

Citizens gathered on the banks near the sea, May 1943.

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More Gordon Parks 1943 Memorial Day pictures click here

Friedrich Nietzsche Quote of the Week from Greg Bover

“The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.”

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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Born in the Prussian province of Saxony, Nietzsche showed a particular aptitude for music and language as a young man. His extensive knowledge of Roman and Greek culture led to his appointment as Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel at the age of 24. His later study of the works of Schopenhauer and Ritschl ignited his interest in philosophy and helped him promulgate his own ideas on relativistic truth, the origins of morality, and the failings of Christianity. He had a close relationship with Richard and Cosima Wagner, and with Lou Andreas Salomé, who would later mentor Rilke. Nietzsche’s philosophy included what he called the “death of God” and the individual’s “will to power” which many viewed as dangerously egocentric. His failing health and ultimate early death left his papers in the hands of his younger sister, whose husband was a prominent German Nationalist and anti-Semite. Their reworking of posthumous editions of his philosophy gave them an ugly twist the Nazis later used to justify their amorality.  A master of aphorism, it was Nietzsche who coined the phrase “That which does not kill us makes us stronger,” but also “Within every real man is hidden a child who wants to play.”

Greg Bover

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