Monthly Archives: March 2014

Howard Liberman FSA OWI Gloucester Photos

Catherine Ryan Submits-

CROSS-COUNTRY CHRONICLE

Gloucester, MA in landmark FSA/OWI documentary photographs

Part 3

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American Photographer HOWARD LIBERMAN

150 FSA/OWI photos in Gloucester, MA, September 1942

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Hey, Joey,

Here is Part 3 in a series about Gloucester photographs in the legendary Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) collection within the Library of Congress.

You can go back to Part 1 about artist Gordon Parks, and for some background about the program (1935-42).

Part 2 is about photographer Arthur Rothstein with a timeline and quick facts.

In 1942, the Farm Security Administration Historic Photographic section program was winding down as it transitioned and prioritized for WWII. It was temporarily folded into the Office of War Information before shutting down completely. (Gordon Parks was brought on board during this transition.) Director Roy Stryker was occupied with many directives including securing a safe haven for the FSA archives. He was also maintaining a network of contacts in the publishing world and private sectors, and writing. He contributed a chapter for Caroline Ware’s influential book, The Cultural Approach to History. There was magazine work such as the 1942 issue of The Complete Photographer which published articles by both Arthur Rothstein (“Direction in the Picture Story”) and Roy Stryker (“Documentary Photography”.)

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Rothstein had already left the FSA. In 1940, Peter E. Smith Publishers, Gloucester, MA, produced his photo book, Depression Years as Photographed by Arthur Rothstein. This compilation of photographs included the best known Gloucester image from his 1937 visit; was it one of the publisher’s, too.

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In 1941, Elmer Davis was appointed as the Director of the newly created Office of War Information (OWI). In 1942, Davis hired Francis Edwin Brennan from FORTUNE magazine to head the Graphics Department of the OWI.

As Art Director of Fortune (1938-1942), Brennan commissioned famous covers by artists such as Otto Hagel and Fernand Leger. He was known in the industry as a serious art and publishing expert and was a favorite of Henry Luce.

It’s likely that Brennan was one contact for Howard Liberman’s engagement at OWI. In August of 1941 Brennan featured a FORTUNE magazine special portfolio of sample posters to showcase the development and potential of this media. Howard Liberman was one of the artists he commissioned; here’s his contribution for that issue:

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And here is a poster Liberman created for the OWI.

1943 --- United We Win Poster by Howard Liberman --- Image by © CORBIS

Liberman worked with color photography, too, which is a sub-collection at the Library of Congress, less known than the black and white. Color photography was available, but more expensive to process and for media publishers to print.

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Howard Liberman was dispatched to Gloucester in September of 1942. His photographs show a clear emphasis on WWII dominant coverage, sometimes with an FSA take.  The titles on Liberman’s OWI photos often lead with a heading. For Gloucester, many images have caption leads that begin with the patriotic category: VICTORY FOOD FROM AMERICAN WATERS.

In Gloucester, Howard Liberman spent a time on the docks and out with the crew of the OLD GLORY.

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His captions seldom include surnames of the portrait subjects. They do have lengthy– sometimes general, sometimes quite specific– descriptions to support the category heading.

There are action and portrait shots of the crew catching rosefish during an Old Glory voyage.

“Victory food from American waters. At the docks in Gloucester, Massachusetts, crew members prepare their trawler for a week’s voyage. Most of the fishermen in the city come from a line of fishermen that dates back for centuries.”

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“Victory food from American waters. Immediately after being caught rosefish are shoveled into the hold for packing the ice. Once called “goldfish” because of their brilliant color, the fish are finding a ready market because of their manifold uses–as food for humans, as fish meal and fish oil.”

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“Crew members throw overboard excess ice from Old Glory’s hold. Fishmen allow a proportion of one ton of ice to three tons of fish. When the catch is unusually large as on this trip, some ice is removed to make room for the fish.”

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“Victory food from American waters. Decks are covered with tons of rosefish as the Old Glory reaches its capacity load. After two and one half days of fishing, a catch of 85,000 pounds has been hauled in”

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“Tomorrow’s fishermen–young Gloucester boys push wagons of rosefish from the unloading pier to the processing plant where the fish are filleted and frozen…Many of the boys will follow their forefathers and fishermen in New England waters”

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Look for ‘scenes’ such as Captain John Ribiera (surname spelled a couple of ways in the archive) at work and with his wife at home. 1942 census indicates “Oscar (Irene) fishermn Riberio” at 18 Perkins Street.

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Note the picture of “the Pilot at the Wheel” above the stove

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Another reminder to look for exhibits to see vintage prints in person, rather than the low resolution files I’m showing here. Various resolution options are available at the Library of Congress. Besides the formal details, check out the Captain’s eyes!

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Binnacle blinded.

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The “Mother of Good Voyages” statue in Captain John Riberia’s quarters on the fishing trawler “Old Glory”

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There are a couple of Gloucester interiors (deteriorated negatives) of the Gloucester Mariners’ Association; they infer “captains welcome only.” One shows a gentleman playing cribbage; another shows Captain Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner Gertrud Thebud.

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Joey, beautiful dangerous industry: shoveling fish into the rotary scaler at a fish packing plant.

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For assignments in other towns, typical headings for Liberman categories include:

Americans All; Subcontracting; School Boys in Training; Industrial Safety; Office Equipment Used by WPB; Women at War; Fuel Oil Consumption; Women Workers (see below making flags); Airports (ditto other industries); Military (e.g. Fort Belvoir); African American Aircraft Propeller Workers (ditto other jobs); Shipyard Workers; Bomber Plant Workers; Price Control; Production; Submarine Chasers; and Conversions (from this to look here it is now was a useful WWII product)

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There are more than 50 additional Gloucester photos in the Library of Congress collection, and one Royden Dixon image from 1940. 

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We are fortunate that so many talented artists worked on the FSA/OWI project, that a few visited Gloucester, and that so many folks across the county were willing to participate as subjects (easier during the War)

The municipal employees and the curators and staff who have worked on these collections (over decades) are superstars. Beverly Brannan is the curator of 20th C documentary photography at the Library of Congress.

For the FSA/OWI program, Director Roy Stryker proselytized that photography was perhaps the best tool for analyzing living history. He felt that photography as a fine art form and its gains in technical ease and advances coincided ideally with the timing of the FSA/OWI historical photographic section. He forecast rapid and constant increase in photography use and adapters. He was inspired by individual and private pioneering antecedents (Brady/Civil War, Hines/Russell Sage), and public ones such as the documentary photographs by William Jackson for the Department of the Interior.

Sometimes I think of Stryker’s Section work along a continuum of government spending on exploration that produced great contemporaneous historical records. The journals of Lewis & Clark. The work created by artists who participated in the NASA Art Program. These FSA photographs.

Stryker realized that there were collections of photography building up in municipalities big and small; how they were catalogued and assessed were critical to their use.  Here in Gloucester, the Cape Ann Museum maintains a Historic Photo Collection containing over 100,000 images from 1840s through now. Photography is included among its permanent and temporary exhibits and what’s not on view can be researched at their archives.

GLOUCESTER PHOTOGRAPHY PRE, DURING AND POST FSA/OWI

There were many independent artists as well as staff photographers (local newspapers, businesses such as Gorton’s, etc.) working in photography here in Gloucester. Every decade has wonderful examples such as Herbert Turner, Alice Curtis (and other photographers that Fred Bodin features), and David Cox’s father, Frank L. Cox.

There were numerous visits from staff photographers of major publications like Life, Vogue, National Geographic, and more. Gordon Parks came back at least two more times; a few other celebrated staff photographers that came through include Luis Marden, Eliot Elisofon, Yale Joel, Co Rentmeester and Arthur Schatz.

No- photographic artists who also worked in photography is another long list, and would include Leonard Craske, Emil Gruppe, Philip Reisman, and many others.

Good Morning Gloucester features photography, that’s for sure.

-Catherine Ryan / all photos Library of Congress, FSA/OWI black and white photography collection

Live Streaming St Joseph’s Novena At Sista Felicia’s House and Arrival Of The Novena Trolley Tonight at 6:30PM

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Here’s the link to the live stream which will go live at 6:30PM-
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/sista-felicia-s-kitchen

We will be live streaming Sista Felicia’s Rosary tonight along with the arrival of The Novena Trolley and all it’s occupants starting at 6:30PM.

Also you are invited to jump on the Novena Trolley With Sefathia at 3:30PM in the Fitz Henry Lane Parking Lot.   First Come First Served.

It’s a great experience.

Viva San Giuseppe! From Virginia (Frontiero) McKinnon

Virginia McKinnon shared her Saint Joseph story last year on GMG. She emailed it to me last night and I thought it would again be a treat to read it on this Saint Joseph’s Day eve.st-joseph-picture0001_thumb

I remember as a child in the 1930’s my neighbor in Gould Ct., Maria Parisi, we affection called “Zia Marrica”  would come to my home with her laundry basket. My Mom would take her little religious statutes from our China cabinet and wrap then carefully and fill her basket, also visiting other homes in the neighborhood, Zia Marrica would set up a very beautiful ornate alter in her home with candles, fresh flowers, a large statue of St. Joseph with many statutes of saints in honor of  St. Joseph. The feast day is celebrated on March 19th every year. Zia Marrica would hold open house for nine days, also inviting the children to recite the rosary and sing the traditional Italian hymns for the novena.  I loved listening to the stories she would tell us of the saints.

Our Pastor Father Kiley went to the superintendent of school and requested the children of Sicilian heritage, be allowed to be dismissed early from school on St. Joseph’s Day to participate in the festivities. I remember going to Zia Marrica’s home. I would sit very quietly as the reenactment  began. The players were orphans. A man representing St. Joseph, a women for Our Blessed Mother and a child for Jesus. The man would knock door three times, requesting food and shelter for his family, during his flight to Egypt. On the third request she would open the door and we would all shout “Viva San Giuseppe, Viva Maria, Gesu‘, Giuseppe” and greet the honored guest very affectionately. When they were seated Zia Marrica would first wash their feet, using a basin of water and towel. The table was filled with all  kinds of delicious food. Three dishes of each food. She spent most of the week cooking and neighbors also brought in food. I remember the honored guest were seated at the table.  All us children sat on the floor and we brought our own spoons. As the honored guest  tasted each dish, the food was passed down for us to enjoy. The first course was the traditional St. Joseph’s pasta.  Homemade pasta with a sauce made of chick peas, fava beans, cauliflower, and fennel. We all took a taste of the food passing the dishing around. In Sicily fava beans were believed to save the people in poor villages from famine, during a drought. They prayed for the intersession of St. Joseph to save them. Fava beans are always kept as a symbol of never being hungry again.

This year I have been  participating in the St. Joseph Novena at my friend, MaryAnn Orlando, home. We  recite the rosary first in English then St. Joseph’s rosary in Italian. We sing the traditional Italian hymns. Shouting “Viva San Giuseppe, and Viva Maria, Gesu‘, Giuseppe” after every hymn. We enjoy a social time and Italian desserts. I asked Mary Ann why she observed this saint’s day. She replied she has continued this custom down from her mother and grandmother.  She stated many people give thanks to St. Joseph for his intercession in answer to prayers and they relate many miracles through the intercession of St. Joseph. She stated her granddaughter was born with spinal bifida and look at that beautiful 13 year old serving people and bouncing with energy and happiness.

Also she stated her nephew was not expected to survive and awoke from a coma, as prayers were being said for him. Her altar is so beautiful. Our prayers are so sincere, I enjoy all the Italian hymns. I remember sitting with my mother and grandmother singing these hymns.  Many homes of Sicilian heritage in Gloucester host this feast every year.

Our parish priest visits each home blessing the altar, flour for making bread and pasta, oranges and lemons.  On the eve of St. Joseph’s day many people will visit for the blessing. A little bag with an orange for sweetness, a lemon for bitterness and a little loaf of bread for sustenance of life. On St. Joseph’s Day a bountiful buffet banquet with  traditional delicious Sicilian food  and wonderful pastry is offered. Each home has open house. All are welcome to attend. My friends, Grace Brancaleone and Katie Fontana also invite me to her homes every year to share in St. Joseph’s Day. I feel our Sicilian community is so blessed and fortunate to continue this wonderful custom.  This custom is celebrated all over this country and also in many parts of the world by people of Sicilian heritage.

Viva San Giuseppe!

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Trolley arrives at the Orlando Family Altar

Sent from Xfinity Mobile App

The Ferrante house

Sent from Xfinity Mobile App

Fontina Home One of the Oldest Altar in Gloucester

The fabric used on this altar is over 100 years old … it is absolutely beautiful! Sent from Xfinity Mobile App

It’s Trolley Time!

Let the St.Joseph Trick-or-Treat Fun Begin!
Sent from Xfinity Mobile App

Live From Sista’s Kitchen

The Novena Crew is getting ready for tonights Festivities!

Trident Gallery

Pale Shadows: Cameraless Images by Pamela Ellis Hawkes
March 21 – April 20

Trident Gallery is pleased to present “Pale Shadows: Cameraless Images by Pamela Ellis Hawkes,” an exhibition of cyanotypes, tintypes, and pigment prints captured without a camera. Inspired by flickering shadows on her studio walls and by the earliest works of photography, made in the 1830s by inventor Henry Fox Talbot, who aspired to “fix a shadow” onto paper, Hawkes experiments with the cyanotype process to make photograms, images made by placing objects directly in contact with light-sensitive paper. In so doing, Hawkes joins other important contemporary photographers who have returned to “historical” or “alternative” photographic processes to refresh and develop their artistic visions. Hawkes’ vision questions the perceived realities within photographs; explores the elusive points of contact between reality, memory, and imagination; and participates in the ageless calling of artists to preserve and honor the ephemeral, to fix fleeting shadows and transmute loss into beauty.

Pale Shadows: Artist’s Reception at Trident Gallery
Saturday, March 29th, 5pm-7pm

Trident Gallery is pleased to host an artist’s reception in honor of Pamela Ellis Hawkes, as part of the Pale Shadows exhibition, on Saturday, March 29th from 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Flowers & Bottles 4 - tintype - 8x10
Dress 1 - cyanotype - 66x30
Image 1: Pamela Ellis Hawkes – Flowers & Bottles 4 – tintype
Image 2: Pamela Ellis Hawkes – Dress 1 – cyanotype

Jazz Sunday Service on 3/23/14 at Gloucester Unitarian Unitarian Church

Jazz Sunday Service with Rev. Jenny Rankin and musicians Ken Steiner and John Funkhouser at the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church on March 23rd

BASICS:
Festive Sunday Morning Service
March 23rd, 2014 at 10:00am in the Sanctuary
Gloucester Unitarian Unitarian Church
Corner of Middle and Church Street, on the green
Accessible Entrance at #10 Church Street
All are Welcome
Additional Information at www.gloucesteruu.org

Jazz Sunday

Read more

Wednesdays with Fly Amero ~ Special Guest: Marina Evans 8-11

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Wednesdays Only: Tenderloin Tips over Salad, $10.95!

Wednesday, March 19th
Special Guest:meflyrl

It’s been nearly two years since Marina and I performed
on the same stage – and man, has she been a busy girl!
Touring and recording across the U.S. and Europe, she
has now been honored as New England Music Awards’
“Female Performer of the Year” for 2014.  Rightfully so.
Her music is compelling, unique and smart. ~ Fly
http://marinaevansmusic.com/

Dinner with great music!
*Each week features a special, invited musical guest
Dave Trooper’s Kitchen…
Tenderloin Tips over Salad, $10.95 (while they last)
Prepared fresh weekly by “Troop”… always good!
Plus – Check out Fred’s rockin’ new wine menu!
Next week..
3/26…
Chick Marston

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Visit: http://www.therhumbline.com/
Looking forward…
…to seeing you there!  :-) ~ Fly

Susan Kelly from Generous Gardeners Shares the Following “Save the Dates” ~

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Save the Dates – Gardening Events in Gloucester
March 2014 to October 2014
Dear Generous Gardener,

Even though it doesn’t feel like it, Spring is coming soon!  We have some dates for you to mark on your Calendars.
Open Gloucester City Planting Committee Meeting  – Wednesday, March 26th 6:00 PM at the City Hall first floor conference room.  This meeting will also be an introductory meeting for any new volunteers who wish to help maintain public gardens in Gloucester. Volunteer gardening will be Wednesdays from 6-7 starting mid-April (weather permitting) to October. Come only the Wednesdays that work for you.  No experience necessary. Please let any potential volunteers know about this.

Plant Sale to Benefit the Gloucester Education Foundation – Saturday May 17th from 8 am to noon.   Please dig and divide your plants for a great cause.  Donors will receive a tax deduction for  the amount your donated plants sell for.  100% of proceeds go to the GEF.  Location will be on Stacy Boulevard by the Fishermen’s Wives Memorial.

Generous Gardeners at the Cape Ann Farmers Market – Thursdays starting in June we will have a booth to promote volunteering, our events and there will be a plant swap table.  Bring a plant and get a plant.  There will also be plants for sale.

2014 Gloucester Garden Tour – Saturday, July 12 from 10 am to 4 pm.  This is a tour of unique and fabulous gardens on our Picturesque Back Shore.  There are 12 amazing properties, some large and some small.  Tickets are $25 ($20 in advance)www.gloucestergardentour.com. Proceeds to benefit the new Plant Grant Circle Project (Dig Deep and Plant Grant!)  Check out www.plantgrantcircle.org to find out more about the project or to find out about contributing.

Fall Plant Sale and Swap – This annual event will be on the Boulevard on October 4th

Community Photos 3/18/14

Gloucester Charter Connection Grand Opening photos from Anthony Marks

Hi Joey
The grand opening of the Gloucester Charter Connection 76 Essex Ave.
was held on Saturday March 15th at noon. The blessing was given by
Rev. Karen Wade of Rockport. The ribbon was cut by Sen. Bruce Tarr who
also spoke.
The interior walls are lined with fiberglass Tunas,a Shark and a
Sailfish as well as paintings by Capt. Phil Cusumano.
The opening was well attended. The event was catered by the Causeway
restaurant.


Icelandic Minister of Industry and Commerce visits Gloucester for Innovation House Reception

(The City of Gloucester recently welcomed Iceland’s minister of industry and commerce Ragnheiður Elín Árnadóttir, pictured at left with Gloucester Mayor Carolyn A, Kirk, during a reception at Innovation House Gloucester to celebrate the newly formed relationship between the City and Iceland.

Innovation House, which will open later this year, will provide office space, networking and lodging to start-up companies.

 

Minister and Mayor Kirk

· Mayor Kirk and the Icelandic minister of industry and commerce

Tatsuki Tomita and Mayor Kirk

· The mayor chatting with Tatsuki Tomita, of Vivaldi Technologies. (He also worked for Opera Software with Jon von Tetzchner).

Mayor Kirk & Brad Stilwell

· And the Mayor with Brad Stilwell, of the U.S. Embassy in Iceland. Stilwell is the Economic/Commercial Officer within the embassy.

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