Are you a Microcelebrity?

I must be a microcelebrity. Someone I didn’t know yelled out “Hey Paulie Walnuts!” in the middle of Best Buy.

IF YOU SEE ME ON THE BEACH THIS SUMMER, DON'T BE AFRAID TO SAY HI.

IF YOU SEE ME ON THE BEACH THIS SUMMER, DON’T BE AFRAID TO SAY HI.

Become a Microcelebrity
by Clint Watson

Dear Subscriber,

A few weeks ago, I wrote a piece encouraging you, as artists, to create your own community. I discussed building your own community of fans and followers without getting sucked into over-hyped social sites such as MySpace or FaceBook. Reflecting on it a bit more, I realize there is another ingredient to success in online social networking….not only must you build a community…but you must become the leader of that community.

Over this past weekend I read an article in Wired magazine (issue 15.12), Almost Famous by Clive Thompson. The article discusses the relatively recent phenomenon of microcelebrities.

Clive puts it this way:

Microcelebrity is the phenomenon of being extremely well known not to millions but to a small group – a thousand people, or maybe only a few dozen. As DIY media reach ever deeper into our lives, it’s happening to more and more of us….[If you engage in online information publishing via web sites, blogs, and newsletters] odds are there are complete strangers who know about you — and maybe even talk about you.

You, dear artist, need to become a microcelebrity (no doubt many of you already are).

CLICK HERE FOR THE REST OF THE ARTICLE.

About Paul F. Frontiero Jr.

Paints and Photographs scenes of Gloucester, Massachusetts Waterfront and Cape Ann. http://capeannpainter.wordpress.com/
This entry was posted in Good Morning Gloucester. Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Are you a Microcelebrity?

  1. Robert Publicover says:

    I can’t get to the rest of this article “Become a Microcelebrity”. The link just takes me to my Outlook page. Is there another link please, one that I can follow to read the rest of the story? Thank you.

  2. The guy in the green thing certainly is a micro something but not sure it is his celebrity

  3. PV says:

    The water must have. Been awfully cold.

  4. Judy B says:

    Really?!
    Not even a micro-celebrity….
    There’s only 1 thing that’s micro, while the rest is macro.
    That’s a beach sight not to be seen.
    I believe in ‘each to his/her own’ — & am not a prude……
    but, save us all from this particular beach display.

  5. Lowell Peabody says:

    That is disturbing, very disturbing. Not sure I can sleep now… Thanks

  6. Dave Moore says:

    Guy is pretty brave to wear this – did he win the bellyflop contest?

    Ni kidding Quote from a law ruling:
    http://www.law.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/publication/387447/doc/slspublic/friedman-grossman-Buffalo-Law-Review-2013.pdf

    Like millions of United States travelers, John Brennan was fed up with the indignity and hassle of airport security screening procedures. After being patted down, the security officer referred him for further screening; the officer detected nitrates on Brennan’s clothes. Something inside Brennan snapped; and he stripped off every stitch of clothing, to prove he was harboring no explosives. As he stood naked in the Portland airport, police arrived and hauled him off in handcuffs. Brennan, a veteran of an annual naked bike ride, insisted he had done nothing wrong. Nudity was an act of protest, he claimed, protected by the First Amendment. After a brief trial in July 2012, a judge agreed with Brennan and dismissed the charge of public indecency.1 There was precedent for his argument about nudity as a form of protest; and, in any event, the local law on public indecency only prohibited the exposure of genitalia if done “with the intent of arousing the sexual desire of the person or another person.”2 Arousing Transportation Security Administration agents was surely
    far from Brennan’s mind. “Sir Godiva,” as one of his friends called him, walked out of court (fully dressed) a free man.

  7. E.J. says:

    I think that color is just wrong for him.

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