Wind Turbine on Rocky Neck! West Wharf, Rocky Neck, circa 1900 from Fred Bodin

I hope our new wind turbines function well and quietly, have no construction crew members injured, and neighbors are not impacted by the noise or low frequency vibration.

Bodin Historic Photo 82 Main Street Gloucester, MA 01930

info@BodinHistoricPhoto.com

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West Wharf, Rocky Neck, circa 1900. (Same building, looking out to Gloucester’s outer harbor, maybe before Dog Bar Breakwater.)


Windmills were used in Persia (present-day Iran) as early as 200 B.C. for the purpose of pumping water and grinding grain. The first electricity generating wind turbine appeared in 1887, and was used by its inventor James Blyth, to light his home in Scotland, named Marykirk. Shortly thereafter, wind turbine technology came into use in America. At the same time, Thomas Edison was patenting and perfecting his electric lightbulb. In 1882, Edison built the country’s first commercial power station, so people could actually use his new light bulb. The station powered one square mile of lower Manhattan, and initially had 59 customers. Everyone else had to rely on wind turbines for electric lighting.

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Packing Salt Cod, West Wharf, Rocky Neck, circa 1900. (I believe this is the same building as above. Notice the lightbulb above her head.)

The fish is delivered to the wharf by the fishing schooner, it’s salted and dried on the dock, packed inside the building, and shipped around the world. The electric lightbulb greatly extended working hours, and was safer and cheaper than kerosene lamps. Gloucester’s fishing industry at the time used new technology to become the top fishing port in the country.

I hope our new wind turbines function well and quietly, have no construction crew members injured, and neighbors are not impacted by the noise.

Fred Bodin Historic Photo

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