Cape Ann Granite Company, Bay View, circa 1890

image

This 5×7 inch glass negative of the Cape Ann Granite Company wharf came from an attic in Lanesville. It shows storage yards and sheds for carving, finishing and polishing granite. A large square rigged ship and a schooner are being loaded with stone at the deepwater end of the wharf in Hodgkins Cove, and the tip of Davis Neck is in the distance. The photo was taken from Mount Misery, which is between Bay View and Lanesville. A small gauge locomotive, named Polyphemus, hauled granite from Blood Ledge Quarry (on Quarry Street) down past Old Pit Quarry to the wharf. Today the wharf is home to the Large Pelagics Research Center, researching migratory species such as tuna, shark, billfish, and sea turtles.

Printed archivally from the original 5×7 inch glass negative in my darkroom. Image #RL-001

Fredrik D. Bodin, Bodin Historic Photo

info@BodinHistoricPhoto.com

9 comments

  • Great post Fred–always so fascinating to learn about our local history through your research and extraordinary photo collection.

    Like

  • A fine example of how a working waterfront can be sustained by Maritime Related development! This is what can happen in Gloucester Harbor. Restore and revitalize all the Working Waterfronts on the Island of Cape Ann for Marine Industrial use!

    Like

  • WOULD LOVE TO SEE THIS IN THE OLD DAYS. UNFORTUNATELY THIS WILL NEVER BE IN OUR TIME AGAIN. PEOPLE WILL KEEP DREAMING OF THE OLD WATERFRONT DAYS THAT WILL NEVER HAPPEN IN OUR TIME. LOVE THE OLD PHOTOS FRED!

    Like

  • WOULD LOVE TO SEE THIS IN THE OLD DAYS. UNFORTUNATELY THIS WILL NEVER BE IN OUR TIME AGAIN. PEOPLE WILL KEEP DREAMING OF THE OLD WATERFRONT DAYS THAT WILL NEVER HAPPEN IN OUR TIME. LOVE THE OLD PHOTOS FRED!

    Like

  • great shot. haven’t seen one from that angle before. attics rule!

    Like

  • I just LOVE these old photos!

    Like

  • I was curious as to the color of granite quarried from Blood Ledge. I am under the assumption that the name of the quarry came about because the granite that came from their has variations of pink coloring. Which also would have added to it’s popularity. Thanks for your help Peter Hill

    Like

  • Hi Fred, thanks for sharing your old photo(s). I am very much looking forward to seeing more of them. Our company is Olde New England Granite and we rescue, reclaim and repurpose granite of all shapes and sizes..many times, we capture large quantities of products such as bridge pier and foundation blocks.. We love the history as well as the material, itself. Two years ago, we reclaimed approx. 1000 tons of creek bridge blocks from a series of creek bridges here on the North Shore. Every block was Blood Ledge..olive green granite. We look for this beautiful granite to make steps, landings, 2″ pavers and hand-split posts from it. It is not that easy to find.
    Fred, we just recently reclaimed about 350 tons of foundation block from an old textile building in Boston. Virtually, every block is sea green Rockport granite. I think this was called sea foam green back in the day. Are you familiar with this gorgeous granite and which Cape Ann quarry this material originated? Was it Bay View? Thanks in advance for your help.
    Biz Reed
    Olde New England Granite

    Like

Leaving a comment rewards the author of this post- add to the discussion here-

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s