Help looking for ship to shore phone and Loran for Adventure

Hi Joey,

We need Gloucester’s help (especially those who know about old fishing boat parts) with one of the next restoration projects for Schooner Adventure.

We want to put an original ship to shore phone back in Schooner Adventure. I don’t know what kind it was. I’m hoping someone out there recognizes this and could possibly help us to find one.

While I’m at it, we’re looking for an old Loran depth finder as well.

Attached are pictures of Captain Leo Hynes using them on board Adventure in the 1940’s.

www.schooner-adventure.org

Loran Depth Sounder 1939cpt.hynes

About Joey C

The creator of goodmorninggloucester.org Lover of all things Gloucester and Cape Ann. GMG where we bring you the very best our town has to offer because we love to share all the great news and believe that by promoting others in our community everyone wins.
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5 Responses to Help looking for ship to shore phone and Loran for Adventure

  1. Damon says:

    Hmm, I am not sure what radio system that is. The handset makes me think that he is working through the late lamented Boston Marine operator though who patched through VHF or Single Sideband radios to phone land lines. We used to use it frequently to talk to family ashore. This system no longer exists.
    Likewise the Loran, which is not a depth finding system but a position finding system. It, like Decca, relies on high school analytical geometry, namely the the locus of points a constant difference in distance from two antennas is the surface of a hyperbola. Thus by measuring the arrival time difference between signals sent at the same moment from two points like Bermuda and Halifax, you can see which line on a chart printed with the hyperbolic lines representing time differences you sit on. Early Loran systems actually used scopes with which you actually measured the time differences between signals as you would in junior physics lab. Later versions did the experimental measurements for you. The Coast Guard has phased Loran out since the world now has GPS. I do not see much point in either getting the radio or the Loran for Adventure.

  2. Damon says:

    By the way, looking at that top photo, I wonder if that is in fact not the Loran, not part of the radio system. It looks like it might have the little scope screen for measuring arrival time differences up in the right hand corner.

  3. Bill Hubbard says:

    Like Damon said above, I’d say the top photo is of the Loran which is definitely a direction finder, not a depth finder. The lower photo appears to be the ship to shore Radiophone.

    I can see your wanting to have an old Loran and a Radiophone aboard to show “the way it was” but neither one would be of any practical use today. The ship should have a modern GPS system and
    Short Wave or Singl Sideband Radio

  4. Adventure will have the modern navigation equipment installed so that she can sail with Coast Guard certification, but we do want to try to put her back to her original fishing configuration with the equipment that she had as she will serve as a museum as well as a sailing vessel. Neither of these pieces will be operational – just there for display. Sorry for the depth finder mistake – misread Joe Garland’s caption in the book. Luckily others with more knowledge of vessels are the ones doing the restoring.

  5. Angus MacFeeley, LT, USCG (ret) says:

    The LORAN receiver almost looks like a surplus WW2 AN/APN-9. LORAN A – a single pulse format that occupied frequencies just above the AM Broadcast band – went off air in 1977 out in the Pacific west of the dateline where I served on LORAN Stations through the 1970′s. It went down a fews years later, east of the dateline after everyone transitioned to LORAN C, an 8 pulse format on exactly 100Khz and stablized to atomic clocks and just recently went off air. Anyway if you’re looking for a similar box, your looking for a surplus WW2 LOARN A unit, not LORAN C. the radiotelephone looks like a typical Ray Jefferson or RCA unit that operated in the MF (2Mhz) band in AM mode.

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