15 comments

  • Man, I couldn’t watch anymore when i saw why he was having a bad day.

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  • You’re a heartless %@*&#$%. How can you torment a creature that’s in pain?!?! SHAME ON YOU!!!

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    • how did I torture it? I filmed it? Is it heartless when someone films poor children with distended bellies?

      Do you think that I was somehow responsible for the injury?

      if so let me assure you I wasn’t

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  • You made it get up when it clearly can’t walk…

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  • That video made me sad, but I guess you are right, that is life. Too bad there was no way to help him.

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  • I was shocked by this video, though honestly I did not watch its entirety. I am not entertained by the senseless suffering of innocent animals. Why would anyone want to see such a thing? I believe it is safe to say that most people who live in Gloucester have witnessed the “real” suffering of an injured seagull and certainly don’t need to watch it on video. Some of us try to net them and take them to a wildlife rehabilitator who can help the bird, either by treating and releasing it, or by euthanizing it to end it’s needless suffering. That is the only humane way to deal with an injured animal. Following the bird around with a video camera only created more stress for the bird and forced it to walk on what is without question a very serious injury to it’s foot and leg. I would only ask that you think on your actions a bit. Perhaps then you will realize that they were both senseless and cruel. I am by no means suggesting that you made this film with the intentions of causing the bird further harm. But I have to believe that it was without thinking that you followed that wounded bird around filming it. Take a close look at the picture of that poor gull. What was the point, really? I might also add that if you are going to host a website that is visited daily by great numbers of people, you may want to consider changing the way you react to criticism. Whether we are right or wrong, if there’s one thing I have learned in life it is that there is much to be gained by listening to the opinions of others, and that there is freedom in admitting our mistakes.

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  • soooo sad.

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  • Shameful……

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  • Joey,
    I’m born and raised in Gloucester and I know how Seagulls are viewed ( Rats with wings). I get it. But… there is nooo way I want to watch an injured bird in pain. It’s tasteless, shameful and somewhat mocking of nature. Yes, I know you didnt harm this bird, you merely filmed it. Let me ask you, do you feel pity or sadness when you see roadkill? You know when you see a squirrell after being struck by a car? I do…nothing I can do about it, and its part of life, but yet I do feel for the animal. Same here… Maybe just maybe think about your audience before you post.
    You do a wonderful job with this blog and I really enjoy it but I felt like I had to comment.

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    • I just feel like this is really part of what happens around here and it is something that people don’t normally get to see although down here on the docks it is a part of weekly if not daily life. Much like wild animal kingdom where the animals eat other animals and stuff.

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  • That made me really sad, Wish I had not seen it! Love GMG but that was too much. Someone should put that poor bird out of its misery.

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  • I see seagulls here at Rose’s wharf that have broken wings and legs all of the time it is truely a regular occurrence and joey is right it is his view from the docks and that is what he sees. I hope you don’t start sensoring your view because then it is no longer your blog.

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  • I don’t think anyone should put the bird out of its misery. Sure, she looks like she’s having a lousy time now but that leg will drop off in a few days and she will join the many seagulls down on the dock that should be nicknamed Stumpy. Since the inner harbor of Gloucester is the home of the laziest most well fed gulls in the world she won’t have much of a problem getting some fish racks even with the gimpy foot. A herring gull can live to be 50 years old. They don’t do that by getting too bummed out by losing a foot or two.

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